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  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
    http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8
    October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
    http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
    http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • Defense Secretary Charles Wilson
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8
    October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
    http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
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    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • ., all integrated through the design process. The key to success in mechatronics is: modeling, analysis, experimentation & hardware-implementation skills.
  • Vitruvian Man
  • Need source
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance
  • Vitruvian Man
  • http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/hearing/coch.htm
    What is a cochlear implant?
    Credit: NIH Medical ArtsEar with Cochlear implant. View larger image.A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. The implant consists of an external portion that sits behind the ear and a second portion that is surgically placed under the skin (see figure). An implant has the following parts:
    A microphone, which picks up sound from the environment.
    A speech processor, which selects and arranges sounds picked up by the microphone.
    A transmitter and receiver/stimulator, which receive signals from the speech processor and convert them into electric impulses.
    An electrode array, which is a group of electrodes that collects the impulses from the stimulator and sends them to different regions of the auditory nerve.
    An implant does not restore normal hearing. Instead, it can give a deaf person a useful representation of sounds in the environment and help him or her to understand speech.
    Top
    How does a cochlear implant work?
    A cochlear implant is very different from a hearing aid. Hearing aids amplify sounds so they may be detected by damaged ears. Cochlear implants bypass damaged portions of the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. Signals generated by the implant are sent by way of the auditory nerve to the brain, which recognizes the signals as sound. Hearing through a cochlear implant is different from normal hearing and takes time to learn or relearn. However, it allows many people to recognize warning signals, understand other sounds in the environment, and enjoy a conversation in person or by telephone.
    Top
    Who gets cochlear implants?
    Credit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Children and adults who are deaf or severely hard-of-hearing can be fitted for cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) 2005 data, nearly 100,000 people worldwide have received implants. In the United States, roughly 22,000 adults and nearly 15,000 children have received them.
    Adults who have lost all or most of their hearing later in life often can benefit from cochlear implants. They often can associate the sounds made through an implant with sounds they remember. This may help them to understand speech without visual cues or systems such as lipreading or sign language.
    Cochlear implants, coupled with intensive postimplantation therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, developmental, and social skills. Most children who receive implants are between two and six years old. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the FDA lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of cochlear implant.
    Top
    How does someone receive a cochlear implant?
    Use of a cochlear implant requires both a surgical procedure and significant therapy to learn or relearn the sense of hearing. Not everyone performs at the same level with this device. The decision to receive an implant should involve discussions with medical specialists, including an experienced cochlear-implant surgeon. The process can be expensive. For example, a person’s health insurance may cover the expense, but not always. Some individuals may choose not to have a cochlear implant for a variety of personal reasons. Surgical implantations are almost always safe, although complications are a risk factor, just as with any kind of surgery. An additional consideration is learning to interpret the sounds created by an implant. This process takes time and practice. Speech-language pathologists and audiologists are frequently involved in this learning process. Prior to implantation, all of these factors need to be considered.
    Top
    What does the future hold for cochlear implants?
    With advancements in technology and continued follow-up studies with people who already have received implants, researchers are evaluating how cochlear implants might be used for other types of hearing loss.
    NIDCD is supporting research to improve upon the benefits provided by cochlear implants. It may be possible to use a shortened electrode array, inserted into a portion of the cochlea, for individuals whose hearing loss is limited to the higher frequencies. Other studies are exploring ways to make a cochlear implant convey the sounds of speech more clearly. Researchers also are looking at the potential benefits of pairing a cochlear implant in one ear with either another cochlear implant or a hearing aid in the other ear.
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • While there are different ways of defining telematics, market research firm VDC estimates that consumption of automotive navigation and driver information systems was approximately $655 million in 2002 and forecasts this market to grow to $1.7 billion in 2006.” (VDC, n.d., p. 1).
    Parks Associates estimates that the automobile telematics market will grow from $2.7 billion in 2001 to $10.7 billion in 2005, while Allied Business Intelligence estimates that the US telematics market for personal vehicles will grow to $13 billion in 2006” (GartnerG2, 2002, p. 1).
  • More than 25 million AMR units installed on gas (21 percent), water (11 percent), and electric utility (16 percent) meters. 9 million units shipped in 2002 with a total meter market of 200 million units yet to be changed out to AMR (Jackson, 2004, p. 1).
    A California study indicates that peak-rate usage can be shaved by 20 percent if utilities used Automated Meter Reading (ARM) for accurate pricing information--each megawatt of reduction can equate to $400,000 in savings per year (Jackson, 2004, p. 1) saving California utilities and consumers at least $5 billion a year.
  • The current deployment of wireless instruments for SHM is very limited; however, the market potential is very large. The civil infrastructure of the US includes nearly 80 billion square feet of commercial and government facilities and buildings, and more than 100 billion square feet of dams and bridges. Most of these assets are exposed and sparsely monitored for rapid and reliable assessment of vulnerabilities and detection of damage (Sensametrics, 2003, p. 1).
    Rehabilitation, renewal, replacement and maintenance of this infrastructure is estimated to require expenditures of at least one trillion dollars nationwide (Elgamal, et al, n.d., p. 1). Sensametrics has calculated the aggregate market potential to be $50 billion” (Technology Ventures Corporation, n.d., p. 1).
  • Wireless M2M sensor networks and process control systems are expected to be areas of significant growth. Demand for Radio Frequency (RF) Modules used for industrial monitoring and control was approximately 1.9 million units in 2004 and is expected to climb to 165 million units in 2010 (Legg, 2004, p.1).
    Market research firm Frost & Sullivan has projected the industrial wireless sensors market to move from $24 million in 2001 to over $100 million in annual sales in 2008 (Donoho, 2002, p. 1). Further, “the market for Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are projected to grow from $3.1 billion in 2004 to over $4 billion by 2007. As most M2M networks lack adequate security, the SCADA security software market is expected to grow by 50% annually through 2007” (Kuykendall, 2004, p. 1).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
    Taylorism
    F. W. Taylor & Scientific Management
    Mr. Bill's Preface: In October 1995, there was an extended and at times intense discussion in the Quality E-Mail forum on "Scientific Management" and Frederick W. Taylor. At one point Vincenzo Sandrone submitted a post on the subject that the forum moderator deemed appropriate to the discussion, but to long to be posted to the list. What he did was post a notice to the list that the paper was available from Mr. Sandrone via private E-Mail. What follows is that paper posted on this site with permission of the author. The paper will form part of an undergraduate thesis entitled "Total Quality Engineering - A Holistic Approach to Engineering Management" to be submitted in 1996 in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a BE in Manufacturing Engineering at the University of Technology, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Mr. Sandrone's source for quotes is:
    Taylor Frederick W., 1964, Scientific Management - Comprising Shop Management, The principles of Scientific Management and Testimony before the Special House Committee, Harper and Row All the quotes are from 'Scientific Management' this needs to be highlighted as the edition restarted page numbers for each separate section. That is, page numbers are not unique. Please address any comments or critique to Mr. Sandrone.
    Regards, Mr. Bill
    ================================================================== With all the discussion of Taylorism on the list and arguments that both sides did not have the facts, I have decided I may be able to provide some information. I have included a copy of the section on Taylorism from my in process Undergraduate Thesis. I hope that it may help put some facts into the discussion. Looking over the section I have realized that it contained the highest density of direct quotes in my thesis. I feel this was my subconscious way of fighting the, what I considered, misinformation that I had received about Taylorism. Unfortunately I could not find a "definition" of science as applied in Scientific method. However, I would like to make two points: 1) Taylor did not call his original paper "Scientific management" and by the time he published it the name had stuck and his publisher changed the name. (I cannot recall the name of his original paper.) 2) He sort of defines "Scientific Management" by saying what it is not - It is not "Rule of Thumb" when you consider that piece work based on arbitrary quotas ( and heavily biased to the employer) was normal practice. The use of work study/measurement to determine a fair quota was a step forward for both management and the workers. Vincenzo Sandrone QA Engineer GEC Marconi Systems Meadowbank (Sydney), Australia vxsand@gecms.com.au ============================================================== Taylorism Under Taylor's management system, factories are managed through scientific methods rather than by use of the empirical "rule of thumb" so widely prevalent in the days of the late nineteenth century when F. W. Taylor devised his system and published "Scientific Management" in 1911. The main elements of the Scientific Management are [1] : "Time studies Functional or specialized supervision Standardization of tools and implements Standardization of work methods Separate Planning function Management by exception principle The use of "slide-rules and similar time-saving devices" Instruction cards for workmen Task allocation and large bonus for successful performance The use of the 'differential rate' Mnemonic systems for classifying products and implements A routing system A modern costing system etc. etc. " Taylor called these elements "merely the elements or details of the mechanisms of management" He saw them as extensions of the four principles of management.[2] 1. The development of a true science 2. The scientific selection of the workman 3. The scientific education and development of the workman 4. Intimate and friendly cooperation between the management and the men. Taylor warned [3] of the risks managers make in attempting to make change in what would presently be called, the culture, of the organization. He stated the importance of management commitment and the need for gradual implementation and education. He described "the really great problem" involved in the change "consists of the complete revolution in the mental attitude and the habits of all those engaged in the management, as well of the workmen." [4] Taylor taught that there was one and only one method of work that maximized efficiency. "And this one best method and best implementation can only be discovered or developed through scientific study and analysis... This involves the gradual substitution of science for 'rule of thumb' throughout the mechanical arts." [5] "Scientific management requires first, a careful investigation of each of the many modifications of the same implement, developed under rule of thumb; and second, after time and motion study has been made of the speed attainable with each of these implements, that the good points of several of them shall be unified in a single standard implementation, which will enable the workman to work faster and with greater easy than he could before. This one implement, then is the adopted as standard in place of the many different kinds before in use and it remains standard for all workmen to use until superseded by an implement which has been shown, through motion and time study, to be still better." [6] An important barrier to use of scientific management was the limited education of the lower level of supervision and of the work force. A large part of the factory population was composed of recent immigrants who lacked literacy in English. In Taylor's view, supervisors and workers with such low levels of education were not qualified to plan how work should be done. Taylor's solution was to separate planning from execution. "In almost all the mechanic arts the science which underlies each act of each workman is so great and amounts to so much that the workman who is best suited to actually doing the work is incapable of fully understanding this science.." [7] To apply his solution, Taylor created planning departments, staffed them with engineers, and gave them the responsibility to: Develop scientific methods for doing work. Establish goals for productivity. Establish systems of rewards for meeting the goals. Train the personnel in how to use the methods and thereby meet the goals. Perhaps the key idea of Scientific management and the one which has drawn the most criticism was the concept of task allocation. Task allocation [8] is the concept that breaking task into smaller and smaller tasks allows the determination of the optimum solution to the task. "The man in the planning room, whose specialty is planning ahead, invariably finds that the work can be done more economically by subdivision of the labour; each act of each mechanic, for example, should be preceded by various preparatory acts done by other men." [9] The main argument against Taylor is this reductionist approach to work dehumanizes the worker. The allocation of work "specifying not only what is to be done but how it is to done and the exact time allowed for doing it" [10] is seen as leaving no scope for the individual worker to excel or think. This argument is mainly due to later writing rather than Taylor's work as Taylor stated "The task is always so regulated that the man who is well suited to his job will thrive while working at this rate during a long term of years and grow happier and more prosperous, instead of being overworked." [11] Taylor's concept of motivation left something to be desired when compared to later ideas. He methods of motivation started and finished at monetary incentives. While critical of the then prevailing distinction of "us "and "them" between the workforce and employers he tried to find a common ground between the working and managing classes. "Scientific Management has for its foundation the firm conviction that the true interests of the two are one and the same; that prosperity for the employer cannot exist a long term of years unless it is accompanied by prosperity for the employee [sic], and vice versa .." [12] However, this emphasis on monetary rewards was only part of the story. Rivalry between the Bethlehem and Pittsburgh Steel plants led to the offer from Pittsburgh of 4.9 cents per ton against Bethlehem's rate of 3.2 cents per day to the ore loaders. The ore loaders were spoken to individually and their value to the company reinforced and offers to re-hire them at any time were made. The majority of the ore loaders took up the Pittsburgh offers. Most had returned after less than six weeks. [13] The rates at Pittsburgh were determined by gang rates. Peer pressure from the Pittsburgh employees to not work hard meant that the Bethlehem workers actually received less pay than at Bethlehem. Two of the Bethlehem workers requested to be placed in a separate gang, this was rejected by management for the extra work required by management to keep separate record for each worker. Taylor places the blame squarely on management and their inability "to do their share of the work in cooperating with the workmen." [14] Taylor's attitudes towards workers were laden with negative bias "in the majority of cases this man deliberately plans to do as little as he safely can." [15] The methods that Taylor adopted were directed solely towards the uneducated. "When he tells you to pick up a pig and walk, you pick it up and walk, and when he tells you to sit down and rest, you sit down. You do that right through the day. And what's more, no back talk". This type of behaviour towards workers appears barbaric in the extreme to the modern reader, however, Taylor used the example of Schmidt at the Bethlehem Steel Company to test his theories. Taylor admits "This seems rather rough talk. And indeed it would be if applied to an educated mechanic, or even an intelligent labourer." [17] The fact that Taylor took the effort to firstly know the workers name and to cite it is some indication that he empathized with the workforce. This study improved the workrate of Schmidt from 12.5 tons to 47.5 tons per day showing the worth of Scientific Management. The greatest abuse of Scientific Management has come from applying the techniques without the philosophy behind them. It is obvious from Taylor's own observations that the above discussion would be misplaced in other workers. Taylor acknowledged the potential for abuse in his methods. "The knowledge obtained from accurate time study, for example, is a powerful implement, and can be used, in one case to promote harmony between workmen and the management, by gradually educating, training, and leading the workmen into new and better methods of doing the work, or in the other case, it may be used more or less as a club to drive the workmen into doing a larger day's work for approximately the same pay that they received in the past." [17] Scientific Study and standardization were important parts of the Scientific Management. One example, was the study undertaken to determine the optimum shovel load for workers. The figure of 21 pounds [18] was arrived at by the study. To ensure that this shovel load was adhered to, a series of different shovels were purchased for different types of material. Each shovel was designed to ensure that only 21 pounds could be lifted. This stopped the situation where "each shoveller owned his own shovel, that he would frequently go from shoveling ore, with a load of about 30 pounds per shovel, to handling rice coal, with a load on the same shovel of less than 4 pounds. In the one case, he was so overloaded that it was impossible for him to do a full day's work, and in the other case he was so ridiculously under-loaded that it was manifestly impossible to even approximate a day's work." [19] Taylor spent a considerable amount of his books in describing "soldiering" the act of 'loafing' both at an individual level and "systematic soldiering". He described the main reasons that workers were not performing their work at the optimum. Though worded in a patronizing way the essence of the descriptions are still valid. [20] The belief that increased output would lead to less workers. Inefficiencies within the management control system such as poorly designed incentive schemes and hourly pay rates not linked to productivity Poor design of the performance of the work by rule-of-thumb The fear of redundancies within the workforce was a valid argument during the previous style of management. Taylor not only countered this argument by using economic arguments of increased demand due to decreased pricing but put forward the idea of sharing the gains with the workforce. Taylor saw the weaknesses of piece work in the workers reactions to gradual decreases in the piece rate as the worker produced more pieces by working harder and/or smarter. The worker then is determined to have no more reduction in rate by "soldiering". This deception leads to an antagonistic view of management and a general deterioration of the worker/management relationship. Taylor also was a strong advocate of worker development. It follows that the most important object of both the workman and the establishment should be the training and development of each individual in the establishment, so that he can do ( at his fastest pace and with the maximum of efficiency) the highest class of work for which his natural abilities for him." [21] Taylor's ideas on management and workers speaks of justice for both parties. "It (the public) will no longer tolerate the type of employer who has his eyes only on dividends alone, who refuses to do his share of the work and who merely cracks the whip over the heads of his workmen and attempts to drive them harder work for low pay. No more will it tolerate tyranny on the part of labour which demands one increase after another in pay and shorter hours while at the same time it becomes less instead of more efficient."[22] Taylor's system was widely adopted in the United States and the world. Although the Taylor system originated in the factory production departments, the concept of separating planning from execution was universal in nature and, hence, had potential application to other areas: production support services offices operations service industries. Management's new responsibilities were extended to include: [23] Replacing the old rule-of-thumb with scientific management Scientifically select and train, teach and develop the workman "Heartily cooperate with the men so as to insure[sic] all the work being done in accordance with the principles of the science which has been developed" Take over the work for which they are "better fitted" than the workmen. Relationship between Taylorism and TQM Taylor's more general summary of the principles of Scientific Management are better suited for inclusion into the TQM methodology, than the narrow definitions. "It is no single element , but rather the this whole combination, that constitutes Scientific Management, which may be summarized as: Science, not rule of thumb Harmony, not discord Cooperation, not individualism Maximum output in place of restricted output The development of each man to his greatest efficiency and prosperity" [24] Much has happened, since Taylor developed his method of Scientific Management, to make obsolete the premises on which he based his concepts: Lack of education is no longer reason enough to separate the planning function The balance of power between managers and the work force has changed. Where in Taylor's time it was heavily weighted against the workers. Unionism (or the threat of it) has profoundly changed that balance. Changes in the climate of social thinking. Revolts against the "dehumanizing" of work. A basic tenet of Scientific management was that employees were not highly educated and thus were unable to perform any but the simplest tasks. Modern thought is that all employees have intimate knowledge of job conditions and are therefore able to make useful contributions. Rather than dehumanizing the work and breaking the work down into smaller and smaller units to maximize efficiency without giving thought to the job satisfaction of the working. Encouragement of work based teams in which all workers may contribute. Such contributions increase worker morale, provide a sense of ownership, and improve management-worker relations generally. References 1. Scientific Management, pg 129-130 2. Scientific Management, pg 130 3. Scientific Management, pg 131 4. Scientific Management, pg 131 5. Scientific Management, pg 25 6. Scientific Management, pg 119 7. Scientific Management, pp 25-25 8. Scientific Management, pg 39 9. Scientific Management, pg 38 10. Scientific Management, pg 39 11. Scientific Management, pg 39 12. Scientific Management, pg 10 13. Scientific Management, pg 75 14. Scientific Management, pg 77 15. Scientific Management, pg 13 16. Scientific Management, pg 46 17. Scientific Management, pp 133-134 18. Scientific Management, pg 66 19. Scientific Management, pg 67 20. Scientific Management, pg 23 21. Scientific Management, pg 12 22. Scientific Management, pg 139 23. Scientific Management, pg 36 24. Scientific Management, pg 140 Vincenzo Sandrone QA Engineer GEC Marconi Systems Meadowbank (Sydney), Australia vxsand@gecms.com.au An [email_address] Internet publication. December 10, 1995
  • Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition
    College level cyber competition
    Sponsored by industry and academic partners
    2010 participation: 86 schools, over 600 students
    Multi-stage competition with finals in San Antonio
    Defensive in nature
    for more info
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Vitruvian Man
  • We have a lot of competition
    DCI is not unique in this mission. There are many strong competitors out there. Descriptions of some of the strengths of these regions available in DCI report available on line.
  • Korean “Information Society” development date back to the 1980’s, however, Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) use and production in the past has been associated with equipment, rather than knowledge-intensive production and services such as software, biotechnology, new media and information services (Hwang, Hur and Choi, 2004, p.11) (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (Wong, 2004, p.1). A new phase of public-private partnership including programs such as “Cyber Korea 21”, “e-Korea Vision 2006”, and “Broadband IT KOREA VISION 2007” aims to make Korea the leading exporter of knowledge-intensive production in the world (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (The Korea Times in Swiss Talents, 2004, p.1). This new phase is marked by a transition to integrating convergent information services into the fabric of society, industry, government and education; pioneering the development of technologies, products, services and knowledge-based exports; and supporting the formation and development of new convergence companies.
  • Defense, Aerospace, Homeland Security, Information Technology, Microelectronics, Modeling, Simulation and Training, Video Games, Optics/Photonics, New Media/Film and Medical Technologies5
  • LATIN RENISSANCE – George Cisneros
  • Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition
    College level cyber competition
    Sponsored by industry and academic partners
    2010 participation: 86 schools, over 600 students
    Multi-stage competition with finals in San Antonio
    Defensive in nature
    for more info
  • Defense Secretary Charles Wilson
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8
    October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
    http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • Ncpn oct20 2010

    1. 1. STEM:MainstreamingCTE October20,2010–NationalCareerPathwayNetwork,TX
    2. 2. STEM Knowledge Mergers Skill Mergers ?
    3. 3. May 25, 2008 Phoenix Mars Probe
    4. 4. ROBOTS
    5. 5. General Bernard Schriever Space Speech February 1957
    6. 6. Globalization STEM Demography
    7. 7. SURVIVAL QUALITY LIFE WEALTHJOBS INNOVATION The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    8. 8. STEMacademic and CTE
    9. 9. Dr. David Thornburg Thornburg Center for Space Exploration and Thornburg Center for Professional Development Inquiry STEM as a System PBL Simulation Creativity Play Praxis Mission to Mars Thornburg Center for Space Exploration Organizing Metaphor Platypus – The Ultimate Multi-Skill Mammal
    10. 10. Dr. David Thornburg, Center for Professional Development. Adapted by Jim Brazell, VentureRAMP, Inc.
    11. 11. Mars Ready
    12. 12. STEM is horizontal across all 15 of the 16 DOL clusters in terms of jobs.
    13. 13. STEM is fundamental to jobs, the economy, democracy, and civil society… Not to mention the “American way of life.”
    14. 14. SURVIVAL QUALITY LIFE WEALTHJOBS INNOVATION The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    15. 15. Applied Problem Solving Real World Knowledge The key missing literacy of the 21st century is transdisciplinarity.
    16. 16. Character Leadership Health Physical ED AcademicsCTE ARTS Design The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    17. 17. • 21ST Century Literacy • Strategy of Technology • Implications for Work • Emerging Cyber Regions
    18. 18. Twitter RadicalPlatypus Web Radicalplatypus.com Jimbrazell.com
    19. 19. “There are kids on Maui who have never been to the top of the mountain or to Hana much less have they traveled off of the island.” http://www.flickr.com/photos/fotographis/528878003/sizes/o/ When I say Maui, do you think science and technology or innovation?
    20. 20. http://www.flickr.com/photos/fotographis/528878003/sizes/o/
    21. 21. “I do not think Maui is any different than the mainland…post industrialization has placed greater demands on math and education.” –Rose Yamada, elder
    22. 22. rigor = old knowledge--the fundamentals.
    23. 23. “I am looking at the intersection of these technologies—where they overlap.” --Mark Hoffman, ECET Program Coordinator, MCC
    24. 24. Mechatronics The synergistic combination of mechanical engineering, electronics, control systems and computers. Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Departments at RPI All Contents Copyright(C) 2001 Mechatronics Lab at RPI Optics
    25. 25. relationships = systems.
    26. 26. Hawiian Translation
    27. 27. “Ahupua’a”
    28. 28. http://www.3dnworld.com/users/1/images/UltimateEarth.jpg
    29. 29. “Ahupua’a” Holistic system of systems
    30. 30. Our product line is inventions.” –Dan O’Connel, CEO
    31. 31. relevance = currency to the world—past, present and/or future.
    32. 32. “Ho’ohanalima”
    33. 33. “Ho’ohanalima” Learning by doing
    34. 34. . Environmental impact study during the reconstruction of Koie’ie Fishpond located in north Kihei– Kihei Charter School
    35. 35. Opihi Population Health Assessment Research Study– Kihei Charter School
    36. 36. Waipulani Longitudinal Algae Research Project – Kihei Charter School
    37. 37. SURVIVAL QUALITY LIFE WEALTHJOBS INNOVATION The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    38. 38. Applied Problem Solving Real World Knowledge The key missing literacy of the 21st century is transdisciplinarity.
    39. 39. During 1995 Dr. George Kozmetsky in collaboration with Dr. Murat M. Tanik (was at UT at the time), Dr. David Gibson, Dr. Raymond T. Yeh, Dr. C. V. Ramamoorty, and Dr. Herbert Simon, spearheaded the establishment of the Society for Design and Process Science (www.sdpsnet.org) and the Transactions for the society, as an archival journal, covering issues “transcending disciplinary boundaries.”
    40. 40. Design Scale Systems Thinking The Key Missing Literacy of the 21st Century is Transdisciplinarity. Security Competitiveness Innovation Cooperation TEAMS Processes Systems
    41. 41. SYSTEMS (Systems in Project 2061), DESIGN (Models in Project 2061), PROCESS (Constancy and Change in Project 2061), and METRICS/MEASUREMENTS (Scale in Project 2061). Dr. Murat Tanik, University of Alabama Birmingham
    42. 42. Texas Engineering Mathematics Target Texas 4x4 – 4th Year of Math Unify General Academics and CTE Connect rigor and relevance High motivation-TEAMS-Competition Base for industry support in schools Moving robotics from 10% penetration to 80% in 5 years
    43. 43. Character Leadership Health Physical ED AcademicsCTE ARTS Design The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    44. 44. • 21ST Century Literacy • Strategy of Technology • Implications for Work • Emerging Cyber Regions
    45. 45. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html Nokia Research Center, Helsinki Finland in MIT Technology Review How many of you have a cell phone in your pocket?
    46. 46. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html Nokia Research Center, Helsinki Finland in MIT Technology Review The future just caught you….
    47. 47. http://thewere42.wordpress.com/2009/07/15/augmented-reality-ar-will-it-change-your-life-tech-world-says-yes/
    48. 48. The World 3.0
    49. 49. In 1994 a single super computer with the power of an X-box did not exist. ~$100MM
    50. 50. $7.5 million project that immerses students in the hectic environment of a hospital's intensive care unit and places them in a first-person role as a health-care professional. Funded by the U.S. Office of Naval Research, Pulse!! is being developed by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, which in turn hired Hunt Valley (Md.)-based BreakAway to produce and design the platform. –Business Week http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/apr2006/id20060410_051875.htm Pulse!!
    51. 51. Case study: Emergency Response Training, Pjotr van Schothorst VSTEP BV, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    52. 52. Whyville City Hall ©numedeon,inc.2004 Whyville Senators OrEoBaBy Sooner
    53. 53. Whyville.net
    54. 54. Air-Land-Sea- Space
    55. 55. AIR
    56. 56. SEA – OCEAN IT
    57. 57. Skill Mergers ? Space
    58. 58. Sea Land SpaceAir Cyberspace The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    59. 59. 5th World
    60. 60. Structure of Technology (C-STEM) Michael Sekora, Ph.D., Eliza Evans, Ph.D., Jim Brazell, et al., 2005, Digital Convergence Initiative
    61. 61. Structure of Technology (C-STEM)
    62. 62. MIT Tech Review, 2005 Sensors Physical Chemical Biological http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16 Actuators Physical Chemical Biological PhiloMetron™
    63. 63. FIRST LEGO® LEAGUE Over 80,000 middle- school students in 34 countries participate in the Nano Quest Challenge. 2006 NANO QUEST CHALLENGE Elementary
    64. 64. Electronics Machines SoftwareComputer 4th Generation Computing The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    65. 65. The appropriate mathematics to analyze computing seems to be systems approach with information theory, which will provide a unifying principle for physics, chemistry, biology, and neuro science. Brazell and Tanik, October 17, 2010
    66. 66. Dr. Jim Bower UTHSC, UTSA, Bower Labs “…in neuroscience the necessary mathematics for the base of the computational effort involves large scale simulations.” –James Bower, Ph.D., Computational Neuro Biologist, University of Texas San Antonio
    67. 67. http://www.startrekdesktopwallpaper.com/new_wallpaper/Star_Trek_Voyager_SevenOfNine_JerryRyan_desktopwallpaper_800.jpg
    68. 68. https://www.carle.com/Hospital/about/images/Ear%20Diagram3.jpg Cochlear Ear Implant
    69. 69. Integrated systems – physical, chemical, biological & neurological Solid boundaries between humans & machines Integration of Humans, Machines and Computers
    70. 70. Electronics Machines SoftwareComputer 4th Generation Computing The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    71. 71. ROBOTS http://www.camarasaur.us/alloria/gallery/view_image.one?photo_id=13532351 PLEO
    72. 72. ROBOTS http://www.camarasaur.us/alloria/gallery/view_image.one?photo_id=13532351 “A robotic life form with an evolving Personality.” --Ugobe PLEO by Tom Atwood, ROBOT Spring 2008
    73. 73. Home Technology
    74. 74. Telematics http://www.teradyne-ds.com/telematics/telematics01a.htm SwRI Transguide Automotive navigation & driver info $655 MM (2002) $1.7 B (2006) (VDC). Auto telematics $2.7 B (2001) to $10.7 B (2005) (Allied Business Intell.) TELEMATICS
    75. 75. Utilities A California study indicates that peak-rate usage can be shaved by 20 percent if utilities used Automated Meter Reading (ARM) for accurate pricing information--each megawatt of reduction can equate to $400,000 in savings per year (Jackson, 2004, p. 1) saving California utilities and consumers at least $5 billion a year. http://www.utilitiesproject.com/documents.asp?grID=85&d_ID=2402 More than 25 million AMR units installed on gas (21 percent), water (11 percent), and electric utility (16 percent) meters. 200 million units yet to be changed out to AMR (Jackson, 2004).
    76. 76. Critical Infrastructure Patent thin-nickel-strip magneto-strictive sensor (MsS™). Applicable to airplanes, ships, plants, pipelines and bridges. US 80 billion square feet of commercial and government facilities and buildings, and more than 100 billion square feet of dams and bridges (Sensametrics, 2003). One trillion dollar market (Elgamal). http://www.swri.org/3pubs/ttoday/fall03/Future.htm SwRI MsS™ http://www.swri.edu/3pubs/IRD2002/14-9285.htm
    77. 77. Security and Process Control SCADA $3.1 B (2004) to over $4 B (2007). SCADA security software to grow by 50% annually through 2007 (Kuykendall, 2004). RF Modules 1.9 MM units (2004) to climb to 165 MM units (2010) (Legg, 2004). Industrial wireless sensors $24 MM (2001) over $100 MM (2008) (Donoho, 2002). NovusEDGE Armida DevicePoint
    78. 78. STUXNET
    79. 79. Physics – CASPER Science and Technology R&D Technician 4.16.2007, Baylor Waco
    80. 80. http://www.heartonline.org/images/defibrillator1.jpg
    81. 81. http://www.scribd.com/doc/20950196/PaceMaker-HAcking#
    82. 82. The first time in history our toys are also our weapons.
    83. 83. ?
    84. 84. Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living organisms and in the machines built by humans. Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder).
    85. 85. Industrial Age Scientific Management, Training, Planning and Task Allocation F.W. Taylor, 1911, Principles of Scientific Management Cybernetic Age Cybernetics "the art of assuring efficiency of action" 1958 by Louis Couffignal. Communication and control of living organisms and machines through manipulation of physical, chemical, biological and neurological processes, systems and environments. Economic, Historic & Philosophical Shift Notion of Information Age
    86. 86. ITSA
    87. 87. How CyberPatriot works • Multi-round competition – Qualifying rounds are virtual and teams compete simultaneously – Teams download VMware images and attempt to secure them over a given period of time – Teams connected to centralized scoring platform – Teams graded against known solution sets • Finals held in Orlando and Washington DC Cyber Patriot highschoolcdc.com
    88. 88. nationalccdc.org
    89. 89. CyberPatriot III • Virtual competitions start Nov 2010 • Service Championship in Orlando Feb, 2011 • National Championship in DC April, 2011 • Competitors must be at least 13 years old and in grades 9- 12 (or equivalent if home schooled/in a school that does not make this distinction) as of September 2011 • Teams must have between 2 and 5 members • Only 1 team per school per division • Registration deadline Oct 8, 2010 (or 500 teams) • $350 team fee for Open division • 2009 participation: 170+ schools, over 1,000 www.highschoolcdc.com
    90. 90. • 21ST Century Literacy • Strategy of Technology • Implications for Work • Emerging Cyber Regions
    91. 91. Samuel Palmisano (CEO, IBM): Business Week: 10.11.2004 100 million jobs are going to be created in a lot of these cross-disciplinary fields Council on Competitiveness: National Innovation Initiative
    92. 92. Nanotechnology Fuel Cells Homeland Security ADM, Hybrid, MEMS, Computer Forensics Wireless: M2M Mechatronics Home Technology Integration Biotechnology Digital Games TSTC Emerging Technologies
    93. 93. Physics – CASPER Science and Technology R&D Technician 4.16.2007, Baylor Waco
    94. 94. Chemistry Science and Technology R&D Technician 2007, TSTC Harlingen
    95. 95. National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Peoria, IL Agricultural Genomics
    96. 96. Greener Pathways, White and Walsh, The Apollo Alliance, 2008
    97. 97. Samuel Palmisano (CEO, IBM): Business Week: 10.11.2004 100 million jobs are going to be created in a lot of these cross-disciplinary fields Council on Competitiveness: National Innovation Initiative This is today’s workforce.
    98. 98. EpistemeTechne Art/Craft & Knowledge Mind Body Unification
    99. 99. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 D-J Engineering Engineering Design $50K - $180K Machinists & Sheet Metal $22K - $42K --Razaul A. Chowdhury, President
    100. 100. “It used to be the sledgehammer mechanic. These days, the technology has advanced so much that our most important tool is our brain. It is more of a thinking man’s game now.” Jeff Nelson Service Manager CAT Skill Mergers
    101. 101. Lineman Oil Field Farm Mechanic Wind Turbine Tech Job Mergers – Wind Turbine 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    102. 102. Knowledge Jobs Skill Jobs Jobs Today Post Industrial Workforce Transformation
    103. 103. Knowledge Jobs Skill Jobs Jobs Today Post Industrial Workforce Transformation
    104. 104. White Collar Blue Collar Jobs Today Post Industrial Workforce Transformation
    105. 105. www.af.mil/news/airman/0104/launch1b.html “Production Engineers [from TSTC] start at $43K- $57K per year at United Launch Alliance.” – Edward Rodriguez, Sr. Manufacturing Engineering Manager, ULA
    106. 106. “Aviation Technicians qualify for two pay raises per year of $1.00 per hour topping out at $54K per year.” –Harvey Hall, American Eagle, Abilene
    107. 107. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 Frontier El Dorado Refining Company Operator $40K - $60K Instrumentation $40K - $60K Machinist $40K - $60K --Bill Kloeblen, Manager Human Resources
    108. 108. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 Spirit AeroSystems “1,000 workers a year needed for the aerospace cluster… 2,000 plus when we are on the up side.” --Jeff Turner, CEO
    109. 109. Wesley Medical Center, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 “…critical decision making skills are what we are looking for… and every position in the hospital needs basic computer skills.” Krista Thacker, Manager Staffing Resources, Via Christi, Wichita Health Network
    110. 110. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    111. 111. Specialized Knowledge & Skills Systems Knowledge & Skills 21st Century Knowledge & Skills
    112. 112. Electronics Machines SoftwareComputer 4th Generation Computing The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    113. 113. Character Leadership Health Physical ED AcademicsCTE ARTS Design The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    114. 114. • 21ST Century Literacy • Strategy of Technology • Implications for Work • Emerging Cyber Regions
    115. 115. Economic Development Arts- Culture EducationWorkforce The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation? Security Competitiveness Innovation Coordination
    116. 116. STEM, IT, Arts Integration Leaders US Digital Convergence Centers • New York City • Washington DC MSA • Central Florida • San Francisco/Silicon Valley • Los Angeles • San Diego MSA • Phoenix • Denver • Las Vegas • Austin-San Antonio- Waco Global Digital Convergence Centers • South Korea • Finland • China • Taiwan • Sweden • Denmark • Germany • UK • Israel • Malaysia • Japan Evans, Eliza, Michael Sekora, Alexander Cavalli, Kinman Chan, Jeeyoung Heo Kenneth Kan, Yue Kuang, Prakash Mohandas, Xiaoxiang Zhang, and Jim Brazell. Digital Convergence Initiative: Creating Sustainable Competitive Advantage in Texas. San Marcos, Texas: Greater Austin- San Antonio Corridor Council, 2005. Full Report: http://www.dcitexas.org/DCI_report.pdf
    117. 117. Source: Brazell, Jim, Nicholaus Kim, Honoria Starbuck, Eliza Evans, and Michael Bettersworth. Gaming: A Technology Forecast, Implications for Texas Community and Technical Colleges Austin, Texas: Texas State Technical College System and IC2 Institute, University of Texas Austin, 2004. ISBN 0978677358 Table of Contents: http://www.system.tstc.edu/forecasting/reports/dgames.asp
    118. 118. Citizens’ initiative pavilion in Expo 2010
    119. 119. daVinci The West Imagination Creativity
    120. 120. transitioning from a manufacturing to an innovation economy http://mit.edu/cre/research/ncc/proceedings/ncc-casestudies.pdf
    121. 121. p://www.flickr.com/photos/rosrusspix/3537368960/sizes/o/in/photostream/
    122. 122. Today, Finland’s progressive strategy includes: multi- disciplinary and multi-industry collaboration to integrate nano science-, bio science-, information science- and cognitive science-based research and development (Tieke, 2005, p.9); converging design, art and science in the contexts of education and human development (Tahkokallio and Koivusilta, 2004, p.1); national R&D policy and urban-rural development establishing connected regional centers of innovation; partnering with global high tech markets and industries (Embassy of Switzerland, Beijing, 2005, p.12); and leading the world in “Public-Private Partnership” (with efforts dating back to the year of their independence, 1917) (Tieke, 2005, p.12- 15).
    123. 123. Aerospace, Defense & Security Electronics & Telecom Medical Tech-Life Science Optics/ Photonics Edtech & MS&T Film/ New Media San Diego County DCI MST&G
    124. 124. RD&C Art CHEM BIO INFO NEURO Calit2
    125. 125. First Flight 3 of 6 Dave Kenny
    126. 126. Orlando: Central Florida Tech Corridor
    127. 127. STEM plus Arts
    128. 128. Ocoee Demonstration Middle School
    129. 129. Orlando Tech – High School Program
    130. 130. Orlando FIEA University Program
    131. 131. 8th grade to Ph.D. Pathways for TEAMS
    132. 132. Character Leadership Health Physical ED AcademicsCTE ARTS Design The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    133. 133. INFO UP BIO NANO COGNO SCIENCE ARTS “Roughly 100 million jobs… cross-disciplinary fields.” NII, Business Week, 10.11.2004 UTSA & UTHSC “Latin Rennisance” George Cisneros “$83M Integrated Sciences and Engineering Facility”
    134. 134. 5th World
    135. 135. ITSA
    136. 136. Elementary spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Robot competition plus career and academic exploration and history of science and technology.
    137. 137. spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Middle School
    138. 138. US First-EISD Andrew Schuetze San Antonio,TX High School
    139. 139. “We are seeing high school technical programs go out the window. We are concerned. We are worried.” –Bruce Mabrito, SwRI
    140. 140. Texas Engineering Mathematics Target Texas 4x4 – 4th Year of Math Unify General Academics and CTE Connect rigor and relevance High motivation-TEAMS-Competition Base for industry support in schools Moving robotics from 10% penetration to 80% in 5 years
    141. 141. Source, DIAC, Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility (CPSR), Pattern Languages for the 21st Century, Brazell and Monroe, 2003
    142. 142. Holmes High School and San Antonio Cyber Initiative
    143. 143. How CyberPatriot works • Multi-round competition – Qualifying rounds are virtual and teams compete simultaneously – Teams download VMware images and attempt to secure them over a given period of time – Teams connected to centralized scoring platform – Teams graded against known solution sets • Finals held in Orlando and Washington DC Cyber Patriot highschoolcdc.com
    144. 144. nationalccdc.org
    145. 145. CyberPatriot III • Virtual competitions start Nov 2010 • Service Championship in Orlando Feb, 2011 • National Championship in DC April, 2011 • Competitors must be at least 13 years old and in grades 9- 12 (or equivalent if home schooled/in a school that does not make this distinction) as of September 2011 • Teams must have between 2 and 5 members • Only 1 team per school per division • Registration deadline Oct 8, 2010 (or 500 teams) • $350 team fee for Open division • 2009 participation: 170+ schools, over 1,000 www.highschoolcdc.com
    146. 146. “…newer programs like Pre- engineering, Biomedical Sciences, Manufacturing Engineering Technologies, and Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness are attracting more and more students.” Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    147. 147. Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    148. 148. http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/NR/rdonlyres/E4BE30EF-C723-4A04-9D6E-DFDBEF67DE7F/18555/CTEBook101509.pdf “In Simulation and Gaming students advance their understanding and skill level in computer game design and interactive programming.”
    149. 149. Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    150. 150. Maryland Classroom: CTE: Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Today, April 2008
    151. 151. Character Leadership Health Physical ED AcademicsCTE ARTS Design The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    152. 152. TEAMS CTE-ARTS-Academic Mergers
    153. 153. • 21ST Century Literacy • Strategy of Technology • Implications for Work • Emerging Cyber Regions
    154. 154. General Bernard Schriever Space Speech February 1957
    155. 155. Globalization STEM Demography
    156. 156. SURVIVAL QUALITY LIFE WEALTHJOBS INNOVATION The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    157. 157. 256 mpg
    158. 158. Character Leadership Health Physical ED AcademicsCTE ARTS Design The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    159. 159. 1,000 MPG eq. Fuel Cell Car
    160. 160. STEM:MainstreamingCTE October20,2010–NationalCareerPathwayNetwork,TX
    161. 161. Jim Brazell is a technology forecaster, public speaker and strategist focusing on innovation and transformative systems. He is a member of the Radical Platypus group and the Thornburg Center for Professional Development. Jim Brazell is a technology forecaster whose work on video games, wireless communications, instrumentation, mechatronics and robotics is being recognized recently for anticipating the future. Jim’s mentor is Dr. (Col., ret.) Francis X. Kane the military father of the GPS and project forecast—undertaken after the launch of Sputnik I. Since October 1 of 2010, Jim has delivered speeches to Reliance 21 to inform US STEM policy for the Department of Defense, the National Career Pathway Network, the National School Board Association, and the Florida Career Pathway Network. Jim is known as a boundary spanner and someone who crosses among economic development, arts and workforce associations as well as the worlds of educational technology, STEM academic communities of practice and career and technical education in P-20 systems. In October of 2009, Jim's comments related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) were heard by the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). Jim is a founding advisory board member of the Defense Learning Strategies Consortium and is currently working with the Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce Technology Committee Cyber Action Team focused on Computer-STEM human capital strategy. For the past decade, Jim has served the Austin-San Antonio Life Science Association, San Antonio-Austin-Waco Digital Convergence Initiative, the San Antonio Technology Accelerator Initiative, and the Nano-Bio-Tech Summit Jim’s 2003-2009 forecasting work performed at the Innovation Creativity and Capital Institute, University of Texas Austin, anticipates many current and emerging technologies and jobs relevant to national STEM strategy. Jim is a member of UT’s Digital Media Collaboratory creating simulations and video games for national priorities in education, workforce, economic development and defense since 2003. Between 2008 and 2010, Jim delivered over 150 speeches to audiences ranging from the 2009 inaugural NSF High Impact Technology Exchange Conference -- Educating America’s Technical Workforce and the International Conference on Technology Policy and Innovation on energy policy in Norway in 2008 and on solutions to the financial crisis in 2009 in Portugal. In 2010, Jim delivered workshops on transformative systems and what is next for the joint meeting of the Society for Design and Process Science and the Software Engineering Society as well as lecturing at the inaugural TRANSDISCIPLINARY- TRANSNATIONAL-TRANSCULTURAL conference. Jim’s mission is to catalyze national STEM strategies focused on innovation, creativity and the arts as a bridge to creating what is next in the human story. Jim Brazell is a 1995 graduate of Bradley University, Bachelors of Science in Sociology, Summa Cum Laude. He is a 1995 George Gilder Fellow in High Technology, Entrepreneurship and Public Policy. At Bradley, Jim was the co-principal investigator of Interlabs, the sociology of cyberspace course and the social informatics minor. Jim resides in San Antonio, Texas, with his wife, Lisa Cervantes and daughter Ava Brazell. www.jimbrazell.com
    162. 162. Transdisciplinary education is practiced in pockets throughout the United States and the world. These initiatives are guided by the following criteria: (1) STEM proficiency, and particularly technology proficiency, is now fundamental to every academic discipline, job, and aspect of civil life; (2) CTE is for every student and fundamental to student motivation and performance; (3) expanding educational equity and equality is a function of unifying hands-on learning, academic rigor, and creativity using real-world tools, roles, and contexts; and (4) the well-rounded student is ready for college, life, and career rather than a single track to work and community college or university.
    163. 163. TEAMS Model Schools Systems of Systems • High degree of faculty interaction across disciplines and grades (systems) • Integrating CTE, Arts and Academics (systems) • Learning laboratories and worldly experience with industry-standard tools, processes and problems (systems) • Emerging P-20 systems (P-20) -- Sequenced, integrated and transferable courses HS to CTC to University (systems) • Transdisciplinary culture (systems) Context and frame for learning is real world, purpose driven and action oriented.

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