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Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
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Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
Brazell 5th world_may6_aetc
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  • Every 10 years?
  • LATIN RENISSANCE – George Cisneros
  • LATIN RENISSANCE – George Cisneros
  • America No. 1? America by the numbers by Michael Ventura 02/03/05 "ICH"  - - No concept lies more firmly embedded in our national character than the notion that the USA is "No. 1," "the greatest." Our broadcast media are, in essence, continuous advertisements for the brand name "America Is No. 1." Any office seeker saying otherwise would be committing political suicide. In fact, anyone saying otherwise will be labeled "un-American." We're an "empire," ain't we? Sure we are. An empire without a manufacturing base. An empire that must borrow $2 billion a day from its competitors in order to function. Yet the delusion is ineradicable. We're No. 1. Well...this is the country you really live in: * The United States is 49th in the world in literacy (the New York Times, Dec. 12, 2004). * The United States ranked 28th out of 40 countries in mathematical literacy (NYT, Dec. 12, 2004). * Twenty percent of Americans think the sun orbits the earth. Seventeen percent believe the earth revolves around the sun once a day (The Week, Jan. 7, 2005). * "The International Adult Literacy Survey...found that Americans with less than nine years of education 'score worse than virtually all of the other countries'" (Jeremy Rifkin's superbly documented book The European Dream: How Europe's Vision of the Future Is Quietly Eclipsing the American Dream, p.78). * Our workers are so ignorant and lack so many basic skills that American businesses spend $30 billion a year on remedial training (NYT, Dec. 12, 2004). No wonder they relocate elsewhere! * "The European Union leads the U.S. in...the number of science and engineering graduates; public research and development (R&D) expenditures; and new capital raised" (The European Dream, p.70). * "Europe surpassed the United States in the mid-1990s as the largest producer of scientific literature" (The European Dream, p.70). * Nevertheless, Congress cut funds to the National Science Foundation. The agency will issue 1,000 fewer research grants this year (NYT, Dec. 21, 2004). * Foreign applications to U.S. grad schools declined 28 percent last year. Foreign student enrollment on all levels fell for the first time in three decades, but increased greatly in Europe and China. Last year Chinese grad-school graduates in the U.S. dropped 56 percent, Indians 51 percent, South Koreans 28 percent (NYT, Dec. 21, 2004). We're not the place to be anymore. * The World Health Organization "ranked the countries of the world in terms of overall health performance, and the U.S. [was]...37th." In the fairness of health care, we're 54th. "The irony is that the United States spends more per capita for health care than any other nation in the world" (The European Dream, pp.79-80). Pay more, get lots, lots less. * "The U.S. and South Africa are the only two developed countries in the world that do not provide health care for all their citizens" (The European Dream, p.80). Excuse me, but since when is South Africa a "developed" country? Anyway, that's the company we're keeping. * Lack of health insurance coverage causes 18,000 unnecessary American deaths a year. (That's six times the number of people killed on 9/11.) (NYT, Jan. 12, 2005.) * "U.S. childhood poverty now ranks 22nd, or second to last, among the developed nations. Only Mexico scores lower" (The European Dream, p.81). Been to Mexico lately? Does it look "developed" to you? Yet it's the only "developed" country to score lower in childhood poverty. * Twelve million American families--more than 10 percent of all U.S. households--"continue to struggle, and not always successfully, to feed themselves." Families that "had members who actually went hungry at some point last year" numbered 3.9 million (NYT, Nov. 22, 2004). * The United States is 41st in the world in infant mortality. Cuba scores higher (NYT, Jan. 12, 2005). * Women are 70 percent more likely to die in childbirth in America than in Europe (NYT, Jan. 12, 2005). * The leading cause of death of pregnant women in this country is murder (CNN, Dec. 14, 2004). * "Of the 20 most developed countries in the world, the U.S. was dead last in the growth rate of total compensation to its workforce in the 1980s.... In the 1990s, the U.S. average compensation growth rate grew only slightly, at an annual rate of about 0.1 percent" (The European Dream, p.39). Yet Americans work longer hours per year than any other industrialized country, and get less vacation time. * "Sixty-one of the 140 biggest companies on the Global Fortune 500 rankings are European, while only 50 are U.S. companies" (The European Dream, p.66). "In a recent survey of the world's 50 best companies, conducted by Global Finance, all but one were European" (The European Dream, p.69). * "Fourteen of the 20 largest commercial banks in the world today are European.... In the chemical industry, the European company BASF is the world's leader, and three of the top six players are European. In engineering and construction, three of the top five companies are European.... The two others are Japanese. Not a single American engineering and construction company is included among the world's top nine competitors. In food and consumer products, Nestlé and Unilever, two European giants, rank first and second, respectively, in the world. In the food and drugstore retail trade, two European companies...are first and second, and European companies make up five of the top ten. Only four U.S. companies are on the list" (The European Dream, p.68). * The United States has lost 1.3 million jobs to China in the last decade (CNN, Jan. 12, 2005). * U.S. employers eliminated 1 million jobs in 2004 (The Week, Jan. 14, 2005). * Three million six hundred thousand Americans ran out of unemployment insurance last year; 1.8 million--one in five--unemployed workers are jobless for more than six months (NYT, Jan. 9, 2005). * Japan, China, Taiwan, and South Korea hold 40 percent of our government debt. (That's why we talk nice to them.) "By helping keep mortgage rates from rising, China has come to play an enormous and little-noticed role in sustaining the American housing boom" (NYT, Dec. 4, 2004). Read that twice. We owe our housing boom to China, because they want us to keep buying all that stuff they manufacture. * Sometime in the next 10 years Brazil will probably pass the U.S. as the world's largest agricultural producer. Brazil is now the world's largest exporter of chickens, orange juice, sugar, coffee, and tobacco. Last year, Brazil passed the U.S. as the world's largest beef producer. (Hear that, you poor deluded cowboys?) As a result, while we bear record trade deficits, Brazil boasts a $30 billion trade surplus (NYT, Dec. 12, 2004). * As of last June, the U.S. imported more food than it exported (NYT, Dec. 12, 2004). * Bush: 62,027,582 votes. Kerry: 59,026,003 votes. Number of eligible voters who didn't show up: 79,279,000 (NYT, Dec. 26, 2004). That's more than a third. Way more. If more than a third of Iraqis don't show for their election, no country in the world will think that election legitimate. * One-third of all U.S. children are born out of wedlock. One-half of all U.S. children will live in a one-parent house (CNN, Dec. 10, 2004). * "Americans are now spending more money on gambling than on movies, videos, DVDs, music, and books combined" (The European Dream, p.28). * "Nearly one out of four Americans [believe] that using violence to get what they want is acceptable" (The European Dream, p.32). * Forty-three percent of Americans think torture is sometimes justified, according to a PEW Poll (Associated Press, Aug. 19, 2004). * "Nearly 900,000 children were abused or neglected in 2002, the last year for which such data are available" (USA Today, Dec. 21, 2004). * "The International Association of Chiefs of Police said that cuts by the [Bush] administration in federal aid to local police agencies have left the nation more vulnerable than ever" (USA Today, Nov. 17, 2004). No. 1? In most important categories we're not even in the Top 10 anymore. Not even close. The USA is "No. 1" in nothing but weaponry, consumer spending, debt, and delusion. Reprinted from the Austin Chronicle. www.citypages.com/databank/26/1264/article12985.asp
  • America No. 1? America by the numbers by Michael Ventura 02/03/05 "ICH"  - - No concept lies more firmly embedded in our national character than the notion that the USA is "No. 1," "the greatest." Our broadcast media are, in essence, continuous advertisements for the brand name "America Is No. 1." Any office seeker saying otherwise would be committing political suicide. In fact, anyone saying otherwise will be labeled "un-American." We're an "empire," ain't we? Sure we are. An empire without a manufacturing base. An empire that must borrow $2 billion a day from its competitors in order to function. Yet the delusion is ineradicable. We're No. 1. Well...this is the country you really live in: * The United States is 49th in the world in literacy (the New York Times, Dec. 12, 2004). * The United States ranked 28th out of 40 countries in mathematical literacy (NYT, Dec. 12, 2004). * Twenty percent of Americans think the sun orbits the earth. Seventeen percent believe the earth revolves around the sun once a day (The Week, Jan. 7, 2005). * "The International Adult Literacy Survey...found that Americans with less than nine years of education 'score worse than virtually all of the other countries'" (Jeremy Rifkin's superbly documented book The European Dream: How Europe's Vision of the Future Is Quietly Eclipsing the American Dream, p.78). * Our workers are so ignorant and lack so many basic skills that American businesses spend $30 billion a year on remedial training (NYT, Dec. 12, 2004). No wonder they relocate elsewhere! * "The European Union leads the U.S. in...the number of science and engineering graduates; public research and development (R&D) expenditures; and new capital raised" (The European Dream, p.70). * "Europe surpassed the United States in the mid-1990s as the largest producer of scientific literature" (The European Dream, p.70). * Nevertheless, Congress cut funds to the National Science Foundation. The agency will issue 1,000 fewer research grants this year (NYT, Dec. 21, 2004). * Foreign applications to U.S. grad schools declined 28 percent last year. Foreign student enrollment on all levels fell for the first time in three decades, but increased greatly in Europe and China. Last year Chinese grad-school graduates in the U.S. dropped 56 percent, Indians 51 percent, South Koreans 28 percent (NYT, Dec. 21, 2004). We're not the place to be anymore. * The World Health Organization "ranked the countries of the world in terms of overall health performance, and the U.S. [was]...37th." In the fairness of health care, we're 54th. "The irony is that the United States spends more per capita for health care than any other nation in the world" (The European Dream, pp.79-80). Pay more, get lots, lots less. * "The U.S. and South Africa are the only two developed countries in the world that do not provide health care for all their citizens" (The European Dream, p.80). Excuse me, but since when is South Africa a "developed" country? Anyway, that's the company we're keeping. * Lack of health insurance coverage causes 18,000 unnecessary American deaths a year. (That's six times the number of people killed on 9/11.) (NYT, Jan. 12, 2005.) * "U.S. childhood poverty now ranks 22nd, or second to last, among the developed nations. Only Mexico scores lower" (The European Dream, p.81). Been to Mexico lately? Does it look "developed" to you? Yet it's the only "developed" country to score lower in childhood poverty. * Twelve million American families--more than 10 percent of all U.S. households--"continue to struggle, and not always successfully, to feed themselves." Families that "had members who actually went hungry at some point last year" numbered 3.9 million (NYT, Nov. 22, 2004). * The United States is 41st in the world in infant mortality. Cuba scores higher (NYT, Jan. 12, 2005). * Women are 70 percent more likely to die in childbirth in America than in Europe (NYT, Jan. 12, 2005). * The leading cause of death of pregnant women in this country is murder (CNN, Dec. 14, 2004). * "Of the 20 most developed countries in the world, the U.S. was dead last in the growth rate of total compensation to its workforce in the 1980s.... In the 1990s, the U.S. average compensation growth rate grew only slightly, at an annual rate of about 0.1 percent" (The European Dream, p.39). Yet Americans work longer hours per year than any other industrialized country, and get less vacation time. * "Sixty-one of the 140 biggest companies on the Global Fortune 500 rankings are European, while only 50 are U.S. companies" (The European Dream, p.66). "In a recent survey of the world's 50 best companies, conducted by Global Finance, all but one were European" (The European Dream, p.69). * "Fourteen of the 20 largest commercial banks in the world today are European.... In the chemical industry, the European company BASF is the world's leader, and three of the top six players are European. In engineering and construction, three of the top five companies are European.... The two others are Japanese. Not a single American engineering and construction company is included among the world's top nine competitors. In food and consumer products, Nestlé and Unilever, two European giants, rank first and second, respectively, in the world. In the food and drugstore retail trade, two European companies...are first and second, and European companies make up five of the top ten. Only four U.S. companies are on the list" (The European Dream, p.68). * The United States has lost 1.3 million jobs to China in the last decade (CNN, Jan. 12, 2005). * U.S. employers eliminated 1 million jobs in 2004 (The Week, Jan. 14, 2005). * Three million six hundred thousand Americans ran out of unemployment insurance last year; 1.8 million--one in five--unemployed workers are jobless for more than six months (NYT, Jan. 9, 2005). * Japan, China, Taiwan, and South Korea hold 40 percent of our government debt. (That's why we talk nice to them.) "By helping keep mortgage rates from rising, China has come to play an enormous and little-noticed role in sustaining the American housing boom" (NYT, Dec. 4, 2004). Read that twice. We owe our housing boom to China, because they want us to keep buying all that stuff they manufacture. * Sometime in the next 10 years Brazil will probably pass the U.S. as the world's largest agricultural producer. Brazil is now the world's largest exporter of chickens, orange juice, sugar, coffee, and tobacco. Last year, Brazil passed the U.S. as the world's largest beef producer. (Hear that, you poor deluded cowboys?) As a result, while we bear record trade deficits, Brazil boasts a $30 billion trade surplus (NYT, Dec. 12, 2004). * As of last June, the U.S. imported more food than it exported (NYT, Dec. 12, 2004). * Bush: 62,027,582 votes. Kerry: 59,026,003 votes. Number of eligible voters who didn't show up: 79,279,000 (NYT, Dec. 26, 2004). That's more than a third. Way more. If more than a third of Iraqis don't show for their election, no country in the world will think that election legitimate. * One-third of all U.S. children are born out of wedlock. One-half of all U.S. children will live in a one-parent house (CNN, Dec. 10, 2004). * "Americans are now spending more money on gambling than on movies, videos, DVDs, music, and books combined" (The European Dream, p.28). * "Nearly one out of four Americans [believe] that using violence to get what they want is acceptable" (The European Dream, p.32). * Forty-three percent of Americans think torture is sometimes justified, according to a PEW Poll (Associated Press, Aug. 19, 2004). * "Nearly 900,000 children were abused or neglected in 2002, the last year for which such data are available" (USA Today, Dec. 21, 2004). * "The International Association of Chiefs of Police said that cuts by the [Bush] administration in federal aid to local police agencies have left the nation more vulnerable than ever" (USA Today, Nov. 17, 2004). No. 1? In most important categories we're not even in the Top 10 anymore. Not even close. The USA is "No. 1" in nothing but weaponry, consumer spending, debt, and delusion. Reprinted from the Austin Chronicle. www.citypages.com/databank/26/1264/article12985.asp
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Computer Forensics
    Salaries $45,000 - $65,000
    MEMS
    Salaries $35,000 - $45,000
    Hybrd $25,000
    ADM
    $40,000 - $50,000
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Council on Competitiveness, National Innovation Initiative Samuel Palmisano (CEO, IBM): So we're trying to get younger people earlier on in their lives excited about technology. There are multiple forms of engineering disciplines, so we're not trying to steer them into computer science or a program that they might find uninteresting. After school, weekend and summer game builder programs. Wayne Clough (President, Georgia Institute of Technology): We created a major called human/computer interaction. And what does that do? It draws in a lot of women and minorities -- which computer science doesn't. (Business Week: 10.11.2004)
  • EMBARGOED UNTIL: 12:01 A.M., EST, MARCH 18, 2004 (THURSDAY)  Mike BergmanCB04-44Public Information Office (301) 763-3030/457-3670 (fax)Summary tables(301) 457-1037 (TDD) e-mail: [email_address]   More Diversity, Slower Growth
    Census Bureau Projects Tripling of Hispanic andAsian Populations in 50 Years; Non-Hispanic WhitesMay Drop To Half of Total Population        The nation’s Hispanic and Asian populations would triple over the next half century and non-Hispanic whites would represent about one-half of the total population by 2050, according to interim population projections released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.     Overall, the country’s population would continue to grow, increasing from 282.1 million in 2000 to 419.9 million in 2050. However, after 2030 the rate of increase might be the slowest since the Great Depression of the 1930s as the size of the “baby boom” population continues to decline.     Still, the nation’s projected 49 percent population increase during the next 50 years would be in sharp contrast to most European countries, whose populations are expected to decline by mid-century.     (Statements on race groups in this news release are limited to the single-race white, black, and Asian populations and do not cover other single-race groups or the population of two or more races.) The federal government treats Hispanic origin and race as distinct concepts. (See U.S. Census Bureau Guidance on the Presentation and Comparison of Race and Hispanic Origin Data.)     From 2000 to 2050, the non-Hispanic, white population would increase from 195.7 million to 210.3 million, an increase of 14.6 million or 7 percent. This group is projected to actually lose population in the 2040s and would comprise just 50.1 percent of the total population in 2050, compared with 69.4 percent in 2000. (See Table 1 [Excel].)     Nearly 67 million people of Hispanic origin (who may be of any race) would be added to the nation’s population between 2000 and 2050. Their numbers are projected to grow from 35.6 million to 102.6 million, an increase of 188 percent. Their share of the nation’s population would nearly double, from 12.6 percent to 24.4 percent.     The Asian population is projected to grow 213 percent, from 10.7 million to 33.4 million. Their share of the nation’s population would double, from 3.8 percent to 8 percent.     The black population is projected to rise from 35.8 million to 61.4 million in 2050, an increase of about 26 million or 71 percent. That would raise their share of the country’s population from 12.7 percent to 14.6 percent.     The country’s population also is expected to become older. Childbearing rates are expected to remain low while baby-boomers — people born between 1946 and 1964 — begin to turn 65 in 2011. By 2030, about 1-in-5 people would be 65 or over.     The female population is projected to continue to outnumber the male population, going from a numerical difference of 5.3 million in 2000 (143.7 million females and 138.4 million males) to 6.9 million (213.4 million females and 206.5 million males) by mid-century. (See Table 2 [Excel].)     The projections for the resident population of the United States are by age, sex, race (including the categories white, black, Asian and “all other races”) and Hispanic origin. They are based on Census 2000 results and assumptions about future childbearing, mortality and international migration.
  • These are mostly for your information, to know the demographic breakdown of the student sample.
    “Other” in our study is a combined group with Asian students and biracial students. We combined them in order to have a statistically valid group size.
  • The careers are ordered by priority.
    Design-related fields are at the top fo the chart for both females and males.
    Males in middle school are described in the literature as being more likely to have interests that could be labeled “fantasy careers’ or “glamour careers.”
  • Chart 2 –
  • LATIN RENISSANCE – George Cisneros
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Need source
  • Provide small communities
    Novel way to use learning games
    Special – business relationship between Breakaway and DOJ
    Distribute to 30,000 agencies in Feb
    National Incident Command Sys
    NICS Training
  • Provide small communities
    Novel way to use learning games
    Special – business relationship between Breakaway and DOJ
    Distribute to 30,000 agencies in Feb
    National Incident Command Sys
    NICS Training
  • The most important thing to understand about Whyville really, is that it’s a place full of kids. It’s a virtual city that belongs to the kids who come from all over the world to have fun. The kids consider this their own town, and they call themselves Whyvillians.
    To become a Whyvillian, you create a Whyville persona. In this screen, and every other screen you’ve already seen, for example, each face is a Whyville citizen. To become a Whyville citizen, you create a persona, the most important aspect of which is your face.
    You can see here that the faces are varied and very creative. Here’s an amoeba. Here’s someone driving a car. Here is someone wearing a style known as ‘Goth’. The ungliest citizens you see around are in fact us, the city workers.
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • “Although we often hear about the reasons kids should not play video games, there is, indeed, a positive correlation between video gaming and increased hand-eye coordination, reaction time, spatial visualization, neuro-psychological tests, visual attentiveness and mental rotation,” says Dr. Rosser. “Those are all skills that are required to be a successful surgeon.”A study conducted at Beth Israel Medical Center by Dr. Rosser, found a significant correlation between video game experience and proficiency at laparoscopic surgery. According to the study, surgeons who currently play or previously played video games had a 37 percent reduction in errors and accomplish laparoscopic surgical tasks 27 percent quicker. “The studies confirm what some physicians have long suspected – video games can be natural teachers,” says Dr. Mogel. “However, this probably has been unintended by the game designers.”
  • LATIN RENISSANCE – George Cisneros
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • EMBARGOED UNTIL: 12:01 A.M., EST, MARCH 18, 2004 (THURSDAY)  Mike BergmanCB04-44Public Information Office (301) 763-3030/457-3670 (fax)Summary tables(301) 457-1037 (TDD) e-mail: pio@census.gov   More Diversity, Slower Growth
    Census Bureau Projects Tripling of Hispanic andAsian Populations in 50 Years; Non-Hispanic WhitesMay Drop To Half of Total Population        The nation’s Hispanic and Asian populations would triple over the next half century and non-Hispanic whites would represent about one-half of the total population by 2050, according to interim population projections released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.     Overall, the country’s population would continue to grow, increasing from 282.1 million in 2000 to 419.9 million in 2050. However, after 2030 the rate of increase might be the slowest since the Great Depression of the 1930s as the size of the “baby boom” population continues to decline.     Still, the nation’s projected 49 percent population increase during the next 50 years would be in sharp contrast to most European countries, whose populations are expected to decline by mid-century.     (Statements on race groups in this news release are limited to the single-race white, black, and Asian populations and do not cover other single-race groups or the population of two or more races.) The federal government treats Hispanic origin and race as distinct concepts. (See U.S. Census Bureau Guidance on the Presentation and Comparison of Race and Hispanic Origin Data.)     From 2000 to 2050, the non-Hispanic, white population would increase from 195.7 million to 210.3 million, an increase of 14.6 million or 7 percent. This group is projected to actually lose population in the 2040s and would comprise just 50.1 percent of the total population in 2050, compared with 69.4 percent in 2000. (See Table 1 [Excel].)     Nearly 67 million people of Hispanic origin (who may be of any race) would be added to the nation’s population between 2000 and 2050. Their numbers are projected to grow from 35.6 million to 102.6 million, an increase of 188 percent. Their share of the nation’s population would nearly double, from 12.6 percent to 24.4 percent.     The Asian population is projected to grow 213 percent, from 10.7 million to 33.4 million. Their share of the nation’s population would double, from 3.8 percent to 8 percent.     The black population is projected to rise from 35.8 million to 61.4 million in 2050, an increase of about 26 million or 71 percent. That would raise their share of the country’s population from 12.7 percent to 14.6 percent.     The country’s population also is expected to become older. Childbearing rates are expected to remain low while baby-boomers — people born between 1946 and 1964 — begin to turn 65 in 2011. By 2030, about 1-in-5 people would be 65 or over.     The female population is projected to continue to outnumber the male population, going from a numerical difference of 5.3 million in 2000 (143.7 million females and 138.4 million males) to 6.9 million (213.4 million females and 206.5 million males) by mid-century. (See Table 2 [Excel].)     The projections for the resident population of the United States are by age, sex, race (including the categories white, black, Asian and “all other races”) and Hispanic origin. They are based on Census 2000 results and assumptions about future childbearing, mortality and international migration.
  • Vitality and Maverick Spirit. Can do as ….
  • Vitality and Maverick Spirit. Can do as ….
  • Transcript

    • 1. 5th World: 21st Century Science, Education, Workforce, Demography and Innovation
    • 2. Kurzweil’s Exponential Pace of Innovation Keystone Events In the past 20 years we have experienced 100 years of S&T innovation. In the next 100, we will see as much S&T innovation as in all of human history. Zero Time
    • 3. NANO DESIGN INFO BIO COGNO S&T DIGITAL Globalization Seoul, S. Korea Helsinki, Finland Shift in US Centers of Tech Innovation DC MSA Central Florida San Diego County Tucson-Phoenix DCI, Forthcoming Convergence Technopoleis
    • 4. INFO DCI BIO NANO COGNO S&T DIGITAL Globalization Seoul, S. Korea Helsinki, Finland Shift in US Centers of Tech Innovation DC MSA Central Florida San Diego County Tucson-Phoenix DCI, Forthcoming “Digital Convergence Initiative” Danny Sharon today at 1:30
    • 5. Source: America No. 1? , America by the numbers Michael Ventura, 02/03/05 "ICH" • The United States is 49th in the world in literacy (the New York Times, Dec. 12, 2004). * The United States ranked 28th out of 40 countries in mathematical literacy (NYT, Dec. 12, 2004). * "European Union leads the U.S. in...the number of science and engineering graduates; public research and development (R&D) expenditures; and new capital raised" (The European Dream, p.70). * "Europe surpassed the United States in the mid-1990s as the largest producer of scientific literature" (The European Dream, p.70). America No. 1?
    • 6. Source: America No. 1? , America by the numbers Michael Ventura, 02/03/05 "ICH" • The United States is 49th in the world in literacy (the New York Times, Dec. 12, 2004). * The United States ranked 28th out of 40 countries in mathematical literacy (NYT, Dec. 12, 2004). * "The European Union leads the U.S. in...the number of science and engineering graduates; public research and development (R&D) expenditures; and new capital raised" (The European Dream, p.70). * "Europe surpassed the United States in the mid-1990s as the largest producer of scientific literature" (The European Dream, p.70). • Twenty percent of Americans think the sun orbits the earth. • America No. 1?
    • 7. Sun Orbits Earth . Earth Orbits Sun Inversion Paradigm Shift
    • 8. FROM TO Paradigm Shift
    • 9. 1.Work Shift 2. Demographic Shift 3. Video Game Shift 4. Learning Shift 5. You Shift 5th World
    • 10. ? Work Shift Specialized Work Industrial & Informational
    • 11. “There is a quiet crisis building in the United States [that] stems from the gap between the nation’s growing need for scientists, engineers, and other technically skilled workers, and its production of them.” – The Quiet Crisis: Falling Short in Producing American Scientific and Technical Talent, Building Engineering and Science Talent (BEST) “… the nation may likely face severe shortages in SET workers…” – Land of Plenty, Commission on the Advancement of Women and Minorities in Science, Engineering, and Technology Development (CAWMSET) “a serious deficit of scientists and engineers” resulting in “an evaporating dominance.” – Dan Goldin, former NASA administrator, 2001 “… U.S. need forhuman capital in science, mathematics and engineering is not being met.” – Hart-Rudman Commission "Our 1998 study found a shortage of 346,000 programmers, systems analysts and computer scientists." – ITAA president Harris Miller "We are not training enough American scientists and engineers to retain our prosperity ...." – American Scientist magazine, 2001 (In Sargent, 2004) STEM Alarm Bells
    • 12. STEM Workforce Shortages Today Aviators Submarine Pilots Nurses Scientists Teachers R&D Technicians and Technologists
    • 13. Charles Ostman Senior Fellow Institute for Global Futures 21st Century Architecture
    • 14. Charles Ostman Senior Fellow Institute for Global Futures Council on Competitiveness, National Innovation Initiative Roughly 100 million jobs (Business Week: 10.11.2004) TSTC TSTC TSTC TSTC
    • 15. $35K - $45K $25K$40K - $50K $45K - $65K
    • 16. Specialized Work Industrial & Informational Work Shift Converged Work Non-Industrial & Systemic Knowledge
    • 17. 1. Work Shift 2. Demographic Shift 3. Video Game Shift 4. Learning Shift 5. You Shift 5th World
    • 18. US Boomer Generation Demographic Work Shift ?
    • 19. Boomers Generation X Generation Y 46-64 65-79 80-Present U.S. Census Bureau, Demographic Trends in the 20th Century , Census 2000 Special Reports, CENSR-4, Table 5, November 2002. U.S. Census Bureau, "U.S. Interim Projections by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin,“ released November 18, 2004. 1946 20501900 1964 1980 Rate of Growth
    • 20. Bachelor's Degrees in Various S&E Disciplines As a Percent of All Bachelor's Degrees Earned By That Gender By Gender 2000 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% Engineering Computer Sciences Earth, Atmos. & Ocean Sciences Physical Sciences Mathematics Social Sciences Biological Sciences Psychology Men Women 5.2:1 3.4:1 2.0:1 1.9:1 1.5:1 1.1:1 1.1:1 1:2.4 S&E Bachelor’s Degrees, by Gender John Sargent Senior Policy Analyst U.S. Department of Commerce
    • 21. Census Bureau Projections Thru 2100 U.S. Race/Ethnic Composition, numbers 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 2060 2070 2080 2090 2100 (inthousands) White Black American Indian Asian and Pacific Islander Hispanic SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Technology Policy analysis of U.S Census Bureau Data, Population Projections, http://WWW.CENSUS.gov/population/www/projections/natsum-T5.html John Sargent Senior Policy Analyst U.S. Department of Commerce Census Bureau Projects Tripling of Hispanic & Asian Populations by 2050. Non- Hispanic Whites may Drop To Half of Total Population (US Census, 2004). Where are we looking for STEM Workers: Boomers, Low SES, Minority & Women.
    • 22. Texas Projects 20% Population Growth (2000-2015) The White 15-34 age population is predicted to decrease 5 to 8 percent (increase by 2,822). The Black 15-to-34 age population is predicted to increase by 1 or 2 percent, or perhaps remain static throughout the state (increase by 143,404). The Hispanic age 15-to-34 age population is predicted to increase 5.8 percent (increase by 937,599). As of 2003 Whites No Longer The Majority In Texas (US Census Bureau, 2004) Texas has the largest echo boom. (Source: Regional Plan for Texas Higher Education, 2002)
    • 23. Of Every 100 Kindergartners:(24 Year-Olds) Source: US Bureau of Census, Current Population Reports, Educational Attainment in the United States; March 2000, Detailed Tables No. 2 62 Graduate High School 91 29 Complete at Least Some College 62 6 Obtain at least a Bachelors Degree 30 Latino White
    • 24. S&E Bachelor’s Degrees, by Race Bachelor's Degrees in Various S&E Disciplines As a Percent of All Bachelor's Degrees Earned By That Group By Race, 2000 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% Engineering Physical Science Mathematics Computer Science Biological Science White, non-Hispanics Asians/Pacific Islanders Black, non-Hispanics Hispanics American Indians or Alaskan Natives John Sargent Senior Policy Analyst U.S. Department of Commerce
    • 25. College Graduates by Age 24 Young People From High Income Families 48% Young People From Low Income Families 7% Source: Tom Mortenson, Research Seminar on Public Policy Analysis of Opportunity for Post Secondary, 1997 in From: Latino Health Care Project, Report at Casey Journalism School for Children and Families .
    • 26. College Graduates by Age 24 Young People From High Income Families 48% Young People From Low Income Families 7% Source: Tom Mortenson, Research Seminar on Public Policy Analysis of Opportunity for Post Secondary, 1997 in From: Latino Health Care Project, Report at Casey Journalism School for Children and Families . Poverty
    • 27. Gender SES Ethnicity Grade Level Schools distribution female 58.71 male 41.29 White 29.03 African American 25.16 Latino 33.87 Other 11.61 Low SES 55.52 Not Low SES 44.48 1 29.90 2 39.55 3 17.68 4 12.86 6th 16.50 7th 38.19 8th 45.31 • Investigate the variety of influences on vulnerable middle school students’ career aspirations • Surveyed 310 middle school students in four schools in three school districts (Central and Southeastern Texas area) • Low SES focus schools selected with more than 50% of the student body qualifying for free or reduced lunch. Texas Tweens Study Aliza Gold
    • 28. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 High school or less Community college/technical College degree or beyond How Much Education do You Want? White African American Latino Other How much education? A. Gold, IC2 Institute, UT Austin, Forthcoming Texas Tweens Study
    • 29. Females Males Designer/Decorator Professional athlete Doctor Video Game Designer Cosmetologist Business Owner Lawyer Engineer Teacher Lawyer Business Owner Military Service Musician/Singer Auto Mechanic Cook/Chef Computer Programmer A. Gold, IC2 Institute, UT Austin, Forthcoming Texas Tweens Study
    • 30. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Television Internet Books Counselor/Teacher Parents Other adults or friends Source Where would you look for information about careers that interest you? A. Gold, IC2 Institute, UT Austin, Forthcoming Texas Tweens Study
    • 31. NANO DESIGN INFO BIO COGNO S&T DIGITAL Convergence Technopoleis S. Korea Finland Japan
    • 32. US Boomer Generation Demographic Work Shift Global X & Y Generations
    • 33. 1. Work Shift 2. Demographic Shift 3. Video Game Shift 4. Learning Shift 5. You Shift 5th World
    • 34. Games for Play Video Game Shift ?
    • 35. Overlays Control http://www.pong-story.com/odyssey.htm#P1 1972 http://www.pong-story.com/odyssey.htm “Ready or not, computers are coming to the people.” --Stewart Brand, Rolling Stone December, 1972
    • 36. Projects you into cyberspace. Senses motion for game interaction. New HCI
    • 37. Eye Toy New HCI & HSI
    • 38. Senses geo location for game interaction. New HCI & HSI
    • 39. Transdisciplinarity
    • 40. Source: Brazell, IC2 Institute, 2004 Yang Cai, Ingo Snel, Betty Chenga, Suman Bharathi, Clementine Klein d, Judith Klein- Seetharaman; Carnegie Mellon University, University of Frankfurt, Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. www.andrew.cmu.edu/~ycai/biogame.pdf BIOSIM 1.0
    • 41. GlucoboyThe video game that runs on blood.
    • 42. Breakaway Games
    • 43. Player is Incident Commander or subordinate crisis responder. Responds to events with choices that should mirror Department of Justice NICS doctrine. • Tactical Map set in player’s home county • ICS “hints” throughout gameplay • Coordination and communication required for success • Full-scale training is unaffordable for small jurisdictions* • Permits widespread distribution to many users* *88% of all jurisdictions are considered to be small. Incident Commander
    • 44. Player is Incident Commander or subordinate crisis responder. Responds to events with choices that should mirror Department of Justice NICS doctrine. • Tactical Map set in player’s home county • ICS “hints” throughout gameplay • Coordination and communication required for success • Full-scale training is unaffordable for small jurisdictions* • Permits widespread distribution to many users* *88% of all jurisdictions are considered to be small. “Generation XBOX: Developing Effective Game Based Learning Tools” Chris Clark tomorrow 8:00am
    • 45. Enlight Software, the Jackson Hole Higher Education Group, and the Institute for Research on Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania (data), with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the Spencer Foundation. www.virtual-u.org Virtual U models the attitudes and behaviors of the academic community in five major areas of higher education management: • Spending and income decisions such as operating budget, new hires, incoming donations, and management of the endowment; • Faculty, course, and student scheduling issues; • Admissions standards, university prestige, and student enrollment; • Student housing, classrooms, and all other facilities; and • Performance indicators.
    • 46. Population: 900,000 Growth: 1200/day Educational Sites 3 - 5 minutes EA online games 9 minutes AOL Entertainment 10 minutes Whyville.net 59 minutes Yahoo! Games 78 minutes MEAN TIME PER USER LOGIN Discovery.com: 96 million Whyville.net: 58.4 million BigChalk: 11 million Time for Kids: 8 million New York Times Learning Net: 1.2 million Cosmogirl: 425,000 PAGE VIEWS ©numedeon,inc.2003 The average time per log in July was 3.8 hours making it second to Neopets. Dr. Jim Bower
    • 47. Games for play Video Game Shift Games for learning, communication, health & policy
    • 48. 1. Work Shift 2. Demographic Shift 3. Video Game Shift 4. Learning Shift 5. You Shift 5th World
    • 49. Learning Shift ? Discrete Disciplines “Biologist,” “Computer Scientist,” “Artist,” etc. Boomers Generation X Millennials 46-64 65-79 80-Present 198019641946
    • 50. What are they learning?
    • 51. Player, Builder, Sys Admin What are they learning?
    • 52. Player Incr. hand-eye coord reaction time spatial visualization neuro-psych. tests visual attentiveness and mental rotation http://www.wehealnewyork.org/BI%20Surgeon%20teams%20up%20with%20Hollywood.htm James “Butch” Rosser, M.D., Chief of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Director of the Advanced Medical Technology Institute (AMTI) Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan According to Rosser’s study, surgeons who currently play or previously played video games had a 37% reduction in errors and accomplish laparoscopic surgical tasks 27% quicker.
    • 53. Play - Hidden Learning. Twitch speed (Psycho/Motor) and higher order cognition.
    • 54. Game Builders
    • 55. TEAMS Game Builder Transdisciplinary Action Learning, problem solving & production.
    • 56. Creation of new knowledge, processes, systems, and languages. Game Building is Transdisciplinary
    • 57. Builder = Science + Art. Modern Renaissance. Transdisciplinary action.
    • 58. FCS 2020 Big Sesh Studios Austin, TX defenselink.mil/news/Jul2004/n07272004_2004072705.html ART
    • 59. Neuro Evolved Robotic Operatives Agents cope with changing environments and situations, optimize resource management, and form adaptive tactical solutions in real time. Stanley, Bryant, Perry, Patterson, Gold, Thibault, Miikkulainen IC2 Institute: NERO SCIENCE
    • 60. COPYRIGHT 2003-2005 CRITICAL MASS INTERACTIVE, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. USAF: AIR DOMINANCE ACTION FLIGHT SIMULATOR ART SCIENCE
    • 61. Sys Admin
    • 62. http://www.itsdocs.fhwa.dot.gov/JPODOCS/REPTS_TE/13599.htmlhttp://www.roadtraffic-technology.com/contractors/traffic_man/electrosonic/electrosonic1.html  BACK FLIP C4 Operations Centers Air Land Sea Space Cyber
    • 63. Sys Op – (C4) Command, Control, Communications and Computing Distributed network-based operations, semi autonomous— swarm-like.
    • 64. Sys Op – (C4) Command, Control, Communications and Computing Distributed network-based operations, semi autonomous— swarm-like. “Training for Electronic Warfare and the Digitized Battlefield” Sheilagh O’Hare Tomorrow 9:30am
    • 65. NANO HCC INFO BIO PHARMA & Med Device NASA ENERGY Art and Science of Game and Simulation construction have similar KSA to 21st Century Science.
    • 66. Learning, problem solving and production in one act resulting in creation of new knowledge, processes, systems, and language.
    • 67. Discrete Disciplines “Biologist,” “Computer Scientist,” “Artist,” etc. Learning Shift Converged Disciplines “Transdisciplinary Action” Boomers Generation X Millennials 46-64 65-79 80-Present 198019641946
    • 68. 1. Video Game Shift 2. Learning Shift 3. Work Shift 4. Com. & Computing Shift 5. Demographic Shift 6. You Shift 5th World: Video Games, Millennials and 21st Century Science, Education and Workforce
    • 69. Census Bureau Projections Thru 2100 U.S. Race/Ethnic Composition, numbers 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 2060 2070 2080 2090 2100 (inthousands) White Black American Indian Asian and Pacific Islander Hispanic SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Technology Policy analysis of U.S Census Bureau Data, Population Projections, http://WWW.CENSUS.gov/population/www/projections/natsum-T5.html John Sargent Senior Policy Analyst U.S. Department of Commerce Census Bureau Projects Tripling of Hispanic & Asian Populations by 2050. Non- Hispanic Whites may Drop To Half of Total Population (US Census, 2004). Where are we looking for STEM Workers: Boomers, Low SES, Minority & Women.
    • 70. Texas Projects 20% Population Growth (2000-2015) The White 15-34 age population is predicted to decrease 5 to 8 percent (increase by 2,822). The Black 15-to-34 age population is predicted to increase by 1 or 2 percent, or perhaps remain static throughout the state (increase by 143,404). The Hispanic age 15-to-34 age population is predicted to increase 5.8 percent (increase by 937,599). Followed by UT, OK and OR. As of 2003 Whites No Longer The Majority In Texas (US Census Bureau, 2004) Texas has the largest echo boom. (Source: Regional Plan for Texas Higher Education, 2002)
    • 71. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 High school or less Community college/technical College degree or beyond How Much Education do You Want? White African American Latino Other How much education? A. Gold, IC2 Institute, UT Austin, Forthcoming Texas Tweens – 4 Schools, 310 Middle School Students, 50% Low SES, South Texas.
    • 72. College Graduates by Age 24 Young People From High Income Families 48% Young People From Low Income Families 7% Source: Tom Mortenson, Research Seminar on Public Policy Analysis of Opportunity for Post Secondary, 1997 in From: Latino Health Care Project, Report at Casey Journalism School for Children and Families . Workforce diversity is the solution but we must aim higher than low level employability. We must build a bridge to life long learning and advanced degrees, certificates and technical training.
    • 73. ITSA Roosevelt PREP ITSA Greg White, UTSA: ”K-PhD” PipelineStartyounger! SaySi!
    • 74. ITSA Roosevelt PREP ITSA Greg White, UTSA: ”K-PhD” PipelineStartyounger! SaySi!SIMLAB
    • 75. GAME TEAMS Games have captured millennials imagination and time. Leverage the attention economy of games to develop next generation workforce. We need to pierce the veil of play and support game-based constructivist learning. Transdisciplinarity is the common denominator. Games NANO BIO INFO COGNO Game Builder = System Builder Sand Box & Apprenticeship
    • 76. Charles Ostman Senior Fellow Institute for Global Futures Science Technology Engineering Math US Educational Push
    • 77. TSTC TSTC TSTC TSTC Transdisciplinarity TEAMS Hacking the physical, virtual & biological worlds Modeling & Simulation Inquiry & Real Time Learning DESIGN Artistic processes and imagination are fundamental. US Educational Pull
    • 78. “First person to walk on Mars will be from San Antonio.“ Dr. Francis Kane A founding father of GPS and creator of the GPS International Association, a group for GPS users.
    • 79. “First person to walk on Mars will be from San Antonio.“ Dr. Francis Kane A founding father of GPS and creator of the GPS International Association, a group for GPS users. “San Antonio: Mars Moon City” Dr. Kane & Dooley tomorrow 1:30
    • 80. Ava Marie Brazell
    • 81. The End Jim Brazell, Consulting Analyst, IC2 Institute jim@ventureramp.com Free Download: Forecasting.TSTC.EDU
    • 82. 5th World Global Generations Net Socialization Transdisciplinarity CMC Expression Swarm Organization Net Exchange Economies 3-D Space Global Time 1980 Emergence of the 5th World 198019641946 Boomers Generation X Millennials 46-64 65-79 80-Present Context, Scenario & Socially Driven

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