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  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Need source <br />
  • Need source <br />
  • The most important thing to understand about Whyville really, is that it’s a place full of kids. It’s a virtual city that belongs to the kids who come from all over the world to have fun. The kids consider this their own town, and they call themselves Whyvillians. <br /> To become a Whyvillian, you create a Whyville persona. In this screen, and every other screen you’ve already seen, for example, each face is a Whyville citizen. To become a Whyville citizen, you create a persona, the most important aspect of which is your face. <br /> You can see here that the faces are varied and very creative. Here’s an amoeba. Here’s someone driving a car. Here is someone wearing a style known as ‘Goth’. The ungliest citizens you see around are in fact us, the city workers. <br />
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • The goal of the Smart Dust project is to build a self-contained, millimeter-scale sensing and communication platform for a massively distributed sensor network.  This device will be around the size of a grain of sand and will contain sensors, computational ability, bi-directional wireless communications, and a power supply, while being inexpensive enough to deploy by the hundreds.  The science and engineering goal of the project is to build a complete, complex system in a tiny volume using state-of-the art technologies (as opposed to futuristic technologies), which will require evolutionary and revolutionary advances in integration, miniaturization, and energy management.  We forsee many applications for this technology: <br /> Weather/seismological monitoring on Mars <br /> Internal spacecraft monitoring <br /> Land/space comm. networks <br /> Chemical/biological sensors <br /> Weapons stockpile monitoring <br /> Defense-related sensor networks <br /> Inventory Control <br /> Product quality monitoring <br /> Smart office spaces <br /> Sports - sailing, balls <br /> For more information, see the main Smart Dust page at http://robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu/~pister/SmartDust and read our publications (see navigation button above). <br /> Brief description of the operation of the mote: <br /> The Smart Dust mote is run by a microcontroller that not only determines the tasks performed by the mote, but controls power to the various components of the system to conserve energy. Periodically the microcontroller gets a reading from one of the sensors, which measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure, processes the data, and stores it in memory. It also occasionally turns on the optical receiver to see if anyone is trying to communicate with it. This communication may include new programs or messages from other motes. In response to a message or upon its own initiative the microcontroller will use the corner cube retroreflector or laser to transmit sensor data or a message to a base station or another mote. <br /> Longer description of the operation of the mote: <br /> The primary constraint in the design of the Smart Dust motes is volume, which in turn puts a severe constraint on energy since we do not have much room for batteries or large solar cells. Thus, the motes must operate efficiently and conserve energy whenever possible. Most of the time, the majority of the mote is powered off with only a clock and a few timers running. When a timer expires, it powers up a part of the mote to carry out a job, then powers off. A few of the timers control the sensors that measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure. When one of these timers expires, it powers up the corresponding sensor, takes a sample, and converts it to a digital word. If the data is interesting, it may either be stored directly in the SRAM or the microcontroller is powered up to perform more complex operations with it. When this task is complete, everything is again powered down and the timer begins counting again. <br /> Another timer controls the receiver. When that timer expires, the receiver powers up and looks for an incoming packet. If it doesn&apos;t see one after a certain length of time, it is powered down again. The mote can receive several types of packets, including ones that are new program code that is stored in the program memory. This allows the user to change the behavior of the mote remotely. Packets may also include messages from the base station or other motes. When one of these is received, the microcontroller is powered up and used to interpret the contents of the message. The message may tell the mote to do something in particular, or it may be a message that is just being passed from one mote to another on its way to a particular destination. In response to a message or to another timer expiring, the microcontroller will assemble a packet containing sensor data or a message and transmit it using either the corner cube retroreflector or the laser diode, depending on which it has. The corner cube retroreflector transmits information just by moving a mirror and thus changing the reflection of a laser beam from the base station. This technique is substantially more energy efficient than actually generating some radiation. With the laser diode and a set of beam scanning mirrors, we can transmit data in any direction desired, allowing the mote to communicate with other Smart Dust motes. <br />
  • M2M is a category of Information and Computing Technology (ICT) that combines network, computer, software, sensor and power technologies to enable remote human and machine interaction with physical, chemical and biological systems and processes. M2M has many synonyms including “pervasive computing”, “hidden computing”, “invisible computing” and “ubiquitous computing.” <br /> Reach out and touch someone or squeeze someone or…An accelerometer on the wrist-worn device allows rough detection of hand orientation, gesture measurement, and tapping. In the near future researchers will examine simple activity detection as well, such as sitting, walking, and standing. <br /> As in the bus stop example, a person wearing the device can sense simple touching. This sensation is enabled through force-sensing resistors that provide pressure detection over a high-resolution surface array on the top of the device. <br /> A person can also detect rich signals sent from a partner whirling a finger along the surface of his or her device. Researchers provided this effect by time stamping the sensed data. <br /> Motes, such as the one amongst the candy corn above, are at the heart of several Intel research projects.  <br /> Not only might a wearer experience the simulated touch of a friend, she might also feel the device grow warm to her skin. Using a Peltier Junction, the device can create a subtle heating or cooling on the wearer’s skin. <br /> “The mapping between the inputs and outputs of paired devices is not literal,” says Paulos. “This is an important part of the design. In the same way people developed a language of numbers around early pagers when they sent messages we believe a similar vocabulary will emerge around physical cues.” <br /> For example, to some wearers a gentle warming on the skin might convey a message of friendship. Others might choose to send good vibes by…well by sending good vibes, literally. Intel researchers used simple flat pancake vibration motors to cause wearers to easily and privately feel vibrations though skin contact. Various vibration patterns and duty cycles provide a number of output possibilities for the device. <br /> And for those times when good vibes just aren’t enough, a wearer of the device can send the equivalent of a wireless handhold, an electronic squeeze. <br /> Through the use of Flexinol, a user can feel a little squeeze that mimics the grasp of a hand as the filament in the wrist-worn device contracts when electrically powered. Flexinol is a simple variant of Nitinol, which is often used in robotic applications and commonly referred to as “muscle wire” for its ability to exert force and return to its original shape. <br /> For all the pleasant thoughts and human analogies there may be a dark side to this device. “Imagine someone incessantly tapping, tapping, tapping. You’d probably feel really annoyed,” says Paulos. “It could be your friend trying to get in touch with you. Or perhaps you’re on the receiving end of a lovers’ quarrel.” <br /> “Yea,” says Paulos, “there is an eerie side to this device. I don’t think anyone want to know what spam feels like.” <br />
  • M2M is a category of Information and Computing Technology (ICT) that combines network, computer, software, sensor and power technologies to enable remote human and machine interaction with physical, chemical and biological systems and processes. M2M has many synonyms including “pervasive computing”, “hidden computing”, “invisible computing” and “ubiquitous computing.” <br /> Reach out and touch someone or squeeze someone or…An accelerometer on the wrist-worn device allows rough detection of hand orientation, gesture measurement, and tapping. In the near future researchers will examine simple activity detection as well, such as sitting, walking, and standing. <br /> As in the bus stop example, a person wearing the device can sense simple touching. This sensation is enabled through force-sensing resistors that provide pressure detection over a high-resolution surface array on the top of the device. <br /> A person can also detect rich signals sent from a partner whirling a finger along the surface of his or her device. Researchers provided this effect by time stamping the sensed data. <br /> Motes, such as the one amongst the candy corn above, are at the heart of several Intel research projects.  <br /> Not only might a wearer experience the simulated touch of a friend, she might also feel the device grow warm to her skin. Using a Peltier Junction, the device can create a subtle heating or cooling on the wearer’s skin. <br /> “The mapping between the inputs and outputs of paired devices is not literal,” says Paulos. “This is an important part of the design. In the same way people developed a language of numbers around early pagers when they sent messages we believe a similar vocabulary will emerge around physical cues.” <br /> For example, to some wearers a gentle warming on the skin might convey a message of friendship. Others might choose to send good vibes by…well by sending good vibes, literally. Intel researchers used simple flat pancake vibration motors to cause wearers to easily and privately feel vibrations though skin contact. Various vibration patterns and duty cycles provide a number of output possibilities for the device. <br /> And for those times when good vibes just aren’t enough, a wearer of the device can send the equivalent of a wireless handhold, an electronic squeeze. <br /> Through the use of Flexinol, a user can feel a little squeeze that mimics the grasp of a hand as the filament in the wrist-worn device contracts when electrically powered. Flexinol is a simple variant of Nitinol, which is often used in robotic applications and commonly referred to as “muscle wire” for its ability to exert force and return to its original shape. <br /> For all the pleasant thoughts and human analogies there may be a dark side to this device. “Imagine someone incessantly tapping, tapping, tapping. You’d probably feel really annoyed,” says Paulos. “It could be your friend trying to get in touch with you. Or perhaps you’re on the receiving end of a lovers’ quarrel.” <br /> “Yea,” says Paulos, “there is an eerie side to this device. I don’t think anyone want to know what spam feels like.” <br />
  • Anti depressant, AIDS and Parkinsons dry mouth effects speech and sleepDentist and engineer <br />
  • http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/hearing/coch.htm <br /> What is a cochlear implant? <br /> Credit: NIH Medical ArtsEar with Cochlear implant. View larger image.A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. The implant consists of an external portion that sits behind the ear and a second portion that is surgically placed under the skin (see figure). An implant has the following parts: <br /> A microphone, which picks up sound from the environment. <br /> A speech processor, which selects and arranges sounds picked up by the microphone. <br /> A transmitter and receiver/stimulator, which receive signals from the speech processor and convert them into electric impulses. <br /> An electrode array, which is a group of electrodes that collects the impulses from the stimulator and sends them to different regions of the auditory nerve. <br /> An implant does not restore normal hearing. Instead, it can give a deaf person a useful representation of sounds in the environment and help him or her to understand speech. <br /> Top <br /> How does a cochlear implant work? <br /> A cochlear implant is very different from a hearing aid. Hearing aids amplify sounds so they may be detected by damaged ears. Cochlear implants bypass damaged portions of the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. Signals generated by the implant are sent by way of the auditory nerve to the brain, which recognizes the signals as sound. Hearing through a cochlear implant is different from normal hearing and takes time to learn or relearn. However, it allows many people to recognize warning signals, understand other sounds in the environment, and enjoy a conversation in person or by telephone. <br /> Top <br /> Who gets cochlear implants? <br /> Credit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) <br /> Children and adults who are deaf or severely hard-of-hearing can be fitted for cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) 2005 data, nearly 100,000 people worldwide have received implants. In the United States, roughly 22,000 adults and nearly 15,000 children have received them. <br /> Adults who have lost all or most of their hearing later in life often can benefit from cochlear implants. They often can associate the sounds made through an implant with sounds they remember. This may help them to understand speech without visual cues or systems such as lipreading or sign language. <br /> Cochlear implants, coupled with intensive postimplantation therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, developmental, and social skills. Most children who receive implants are between two and six years old. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the FDA lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of cochlear implant. <br /> Top <br /> How does someone receive a cochlear implant? <br /> Use of a cochlear implant requires both a surgical procedure and significant therapy to learn or relearn the sense of hearing. Not everyone performs at the same level with this device. The decision to receive an implant should involve discussions with medical specialists, including an experienced cochlear-implant surgeon. The process can be expensive. For example, a person’s health insurance may cover the expense, but not always. Some individuals may choose not to have a cochlear implant for a variety of personal reasons. Surgical implantations are almost always safe, although complications are a risk factor, just as with any kind of surgery. An additional consideration is learning to interpret the sounds created by an implant. This process takes time and practice. Speech-language pathologists and audiologists are frequently involved in this learning process. Prior to implantation, all of these factors need to be considered. <br /> Top <br /> What does the future hold for cochlear implants? <br /> With advancements in technology and continued follow-up studies with people who already have received implants, researchers are evaluating how cochlear implants might be used for other types of hearing loss. <br /> NIDCD is supporting research to improve upon the benefits provided by cochlear implants. It may be possible to use a shortened electrode array, inserted into a portion of the cochlea, for individuals whose hearing loss is limited to the higher frequencies. Other studies are exploring ways to make a cochlear implant convey the sounds of speech more clearly. Researchers also are looking at the potential benefits of pairing a cochlear implant in one ear with either another cochlear implant or a hearing aid in the other ear. <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • We are designing and fabricating an electromechanical device for manipulation and electrical probing of nano-scale objects (Figures 1 and 2). The device consists of micro-scale flexures and actuators that generate nano-scale motion; and nano-scale structure that interact with the nano world. Our device is designed to work in conjunction with the AFM and will be used to image the sample as well. <br /> Currently there is no versatile, practical experimental tool for use at this scale. Our goal is to have a cheap and consistently reproducible experimental device. Hence, we are designing this device to be completely batch fabricated start to finish. Despite the lack of batch lithography at this scale, we have developed unique processes that allow for nano-scale feature size and single nano-scale pitch using standard microfabrication. <br /> To ensure consistency between our nano-tweezers, we have developed self compensating devices that can withstand a range of process and subsequent structure variations and still provide the same performance characteristics. This robust design method also has extensive utility in other commercial MEMs applications where repeatability of performance and reliability are essential. <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • http://www.robotdirectory.org/pics/cakemonster/Nano-Scoop3.jpg <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • The most important thing to understand about Whyville really, is that it’s a place full of kids. It’s a virtual city that belongs to the kids who come from all over the world to have fun. The kids consider this their own town, and they call themselves Whyvillians. <br /> To become a Whyvillian, you create a Whyville persona. In this screen, and every other screen you’ve already seen, for example, each face is a Whyville citizen. To become a Whyville citizen, you create a persona, the most important aspect of which is your face. <br /> You can see here that the faces are varied and very creative. Here’s an amoeba. Here’s someone driving a car. Here is someone wearing a style known as ‘Goth’. The ungliest citizens you see around are in fact us, the city workers. <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans. <br /> A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as &quot;the art of assuring efficiency of action&quot; (see external links for reference). <br />

B ncwe v1.0_2007 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Future is Here! Jim Brazell ACCD, UTA and TSTC
  • 2. FROM TO What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 3. “In West Texas, McDonalds gets 40 applicants for every job and I get one applicant for every 40 jobs. Aviation technicians start at $30,000 per year at American Eagle.” –Harley Hall, American Eagle, Abilene
  • 4. 5 Where Are The Jobs? Source: Career Pathways: Education with a Purpose, p. 35 Source: Achieve Texas: Lifelong Success for All Students, p. 3 1950 2004
  • 5. 6 Where Are The Jobs? Source: Career Pathways: Education with a Purpose, p. 35 Source: Achieve Texas: Lifelong Success for All Students, p. 3 1950 2004
  • 6. Crisis in SE Texas, Workforce Alliance Melinda Barnett – Region 5 ESC Leader-Education Committee, Workforce Alliance Task Force 2007
  • 7. Highest Paying Majors 1 Year Post-Graduation: Bachelors & Associates Degrees Only College Major Exit Level Annual Pay 1. Health Professions/Clinical Sciences BA $47,306 2. Engineering BA $45,278 3. Health Professions/Clinical Sciences AAS $44,230 4. Construction Trades AAS $40,120 5. Engineering Technologies/Technicians BA $39,677 6. Science Technologies/ Technicians AAS $37,968 7. Architectural & Related Services AAS $36,737 8. Precision Production AAS $34,167 9. Computer & Information Sciences BA $33,276 10. Business, Mgmt. & Marketing BA $30,851 **Avg. earnings for entire graduating cohort, not for individual graduates
  • 8. Blue Collar Gold Collar What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 9. Why How What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 10. The Future is Here! Science and Technology Jobs and Workforce Making the shift to how
  • 11. “…transfer of the art and technologies of video games to education and learning systems.”
  • 12. Game Quiz
  • 13. What is the average age of all video gamers in US?
  • 14. Entertainment Software Association (ESA), 2005 Essential Facts About the Computer and Video Game Industry, May 18, 2005.
  • 15. What percent female and male?
  • 16. 55% and 43% of all games Entertainment Software Association (ESA), 2005 Essential Facts About the Computer and Video Game Industry, May 18, 2005.
  • 17. “It’s not true that women do not like to hunt. They like to hunt in packs and with a reason to kill.” --My Mom
  • 18. NOSE
  • 19. From Science Fiction to Reality
  • 20. $299
  • 21. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html Nokia Research Center, Helsinki Finland in MIT Technology Review
  • 22. Improved Target Acquisition System Trainer
  • 23. ©numedeon,inc.2004 20,000 Interaction 1,000 Referral
  • 24. Population: 1.4MM Growth: 1200/day Educational Sites 3 - 5 minutes EA online games 9 minutes AOL Entertainment 10 minutes Whyville.net 59 minutes Yahoo! Games 78 minutes MEAN TIME PER USER LOGIN Discovery.com: 96 million Whyville.net: 58.4 million BigChalk: 11 million Time for Kids: 8 million New York Times Learning Net: 1.2 million Cosmogirl: 425,000 PAGE VIEWS ©numedeon,inc.2003 The average time per log in July was 3.8 hours making it second to Neopets.
  • 25. Whyville City Hall ©numedeon,inc.2004 Whyville Senators OrEoBaBy Sooner
  • 26. Games = Toys Games = Next Generation Ed Tech What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 27. forecasting.tstc.edu
  • 28. http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ Berkeley’s Golem Dust 11.7 mm3 total circumscribed volume ~4.8 mm3 total displaced volume Berkeley’s Deputy Dust 6.6 mm3 total circumscribed volume 4th Gen 11.7 mm3 6.6 mm3
  • 29. http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdfintel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp Berkeley Motes/berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/ www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ 6 Pack for $120 on the web from xbow.com
  • 30. http://shino8.eng.uci.edu/Pdf/Tomo_MIT_Mems.pdf intel-research.net/ berkeley/features/tiny_db.asp /berkeley.intel-research.net/paulos/research/connexus/ Intel/Berkeley Connexus www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ Berkeley Motes New H2H Relations
  • 31. MIT Tech Review, 2005 Sensors Physical Chemical Biological http://www.rieti.go.jp/en/events/bbl/03102801.pdf , page 16 Actuators Physical Chemical Biological PhiloMetron™
  • 32. MIT Technology Review, January, 2005
  • 33. Implantable robots.
  • 34. https://www.carle.com/Hospital/about/images/Ear%20Diagram3.jpg Cochlear Ear Implant
  • 35. 3rd Generation Computers 4th Generation Computers What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 36. forecasting.tstc.edu
  • 37. http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_598.html
  • 38. If you have an automobile made in the past 10 years, your car has more computing power than rockets used to put man on the moon. TSTC West TX, Sweetwater, 10.31.2006
  • 39. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7643818/ Running Shoe?
  • 40. http://www.adidas.com/campaigns/adidas_1/content/downloads/adidas_1- wp_02_1280_1024.jpg http://www.adidasprlookbook.com/adidas1/index.asp • 1,000th of a second sensor measures gap between heel and a magnet • 20-MHz microcontroller measures changes in compression • Motor spins at 4000 rpm turns a screw loosens cable • Environmentally and operator adaptive shoe sole Wearable Robot
  • 41. http://web.mit.edu/nanoengineering/research/microfab.shtml Micro-Mechatronics
  • 42. forecasting.tstc.edu
  • 43. NanoBionic Actuators Tethered bacterium Swimming bacterium Swimming speed ~ 20-30 µm Protons flux/motor ~ 1200 proton/rev Tethered bacterium Motor efficiency ~ 90-100 % Output power ~ 2.9×10-4 pW Stall torque ~ 4600 pN-nm  Nano-motor (45 nm wide) Genetic Engineering Harmless E. coli Mohamed Al-Fandi, Ph.D. Research Assistant Professor of NEMS & MEMS Dept. of Mechanical Engineering & Biomechanics University of Texas
  • 44. forecasting.tstc.edu
  • 45. An artificial red cell – the respirocyte [41]. Designer Robert A. Freitas Jr. ©1999 Forrest Bishop. http://www.imminst.org/freitas.html Nano- Mechatronics
  • 46. forecasting.tstc.edu
  • 47. Adapted from NSFNEURO NANO BIOINFO
  • 48. NEURO NANO BIOINFO STEM Mergers Adapted from NSF
  • 49. STEM Mergers Knowledge Mergers Skill Merges Job Mergers ?
  • 50. Academic Silos Academic Mergers What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 51. STEM Mergers Knowledge Mergers Skill Merges Job Mergers Academic Mergers
  • 52. The Future is Here! Science and Technology Jobs and Workforce Making the shift to how
  • 53. “The majority of our workers are in their 40’s and 50’s. [We have a workforce problem today which we expect to get worse over time.]” –Don Ludlum, CEO, Ludlum Instruments
  • 54. Ludlum Instruments
  • 55. “90 percent of our expertise if 40 and above.” –Jimmy Dye, Pres., R.E. Dye,
  • 56. http://www.afmc.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/photos/060307-F-2383G-006.JPG “We’ve had a huge turn over. Most of the guys who hired into Bell as machinists came in the 1960’s.” The average age of machinists is 44. –Chuck Marbut, Bell Helicopter
  • 57. “The IT computer phenomena of the late 1990’s is prevalent today with technology fields in general. We are seeing high school technical programs go out the window. We are concerned. We are worried.” –Bruce Mabrito,
  • 58. http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_598.html Skill Mergers
  • 59. Computers Mechatronics What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 60. “….we had to upgrade our basic mechanic skills to include programmable logic controllers and electrical systems.” --Dr. Ron Lentsch, Allergan 4/2007, TSTC Waco
  • 61. “We need people who have integrated skills related to mechanical, electronic, hydraulics and pneumatics.” --Bill Biffinger, HR, Superior Essex TSTC West TX
  • 62. “We are looking for someone who can look at the mechanical, the electrical and the control and understand these systems. We need people who are capable of crossing over between these various areas.” Don Sheffield Senior Recruiter GlobalSantaFe TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
  • 63. “Automotive Technicians earn $30K-$36K per year.” “Every system on a car is monitored or controlled by a computer. Technicians have to be more analytical and process oriented.” --Russell Carrigan TSTC West TX, Sweetwater, 10.31.2006
  • 64. “It used to be the sledgehammer mechanic. These days, the technology has advanced so much that our most important tool is our brain. It is more of a thinking man’s game now.” Jeff Nelson Service Manager CAT Skill Mergers
  • 65. “Entry-level machinists make $36K-$37K. They top out at $60K but they overtime and up to $7,500 per year for college reimbursement too.” –Chuck Marbut, Bell Helicopter
  • 66. “Aviation Technicians earn $15.00 per hour to start.” –Harvey Hall, American Eagle, Abilene
  • 67. “Aviation Technicians qualify for two pay raises per year of $1.00 per hour topping out at $54K per year.” –Harvey Hall, American Eagle, Abilene
  • 68. www.af.mil/news/airman/0104/launch1b.html “Production Engineers [from TSTC] start at $43K- $57K per year at United Launch Alliance.” – Edward Rodriguez, Sr. Manufacturing Engineering Manager, ULA
  • 69. “Starting wages for Engineering Tech, IT Tech and Industrial Technology range from $28K to $32K.” -- Bill Biffinger, HR, Superior Essex TSTC West TX
  • 70. Skill Mergers
  • 71. Skill Mergers Machinists - ~10-15 Mechanics - ~14-16 Industrial - ~15-25
  • 72. “In most industries you have electricians, mechanics and IT, in wind, you are expected to do everything.” -- Bryan Gregory, Jr. 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
  • 73. Entry-Level R&D Tech $40,000-to-$50,000 4.16.2007, TSTC Waco
  • 74. Specialized Knowledge and Skills Systems Knowledge and Skills What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 75. Nurses use to be able to depend on their ability to care for patients… now they have to be more technical and work with computers, equipment, understanding best practices and managing inventory.” –Pam Craig, Chief Nursing Officer, Brownwood Regional Medical Center Skill Mergers
  • 76. “Half of the dental technicians are over 55. Dental technicians start at $16K-to-$30K per year. Within 5 years thy are earning $45K and many open their own 4- 6 person company and make $100K. 82% of labs are small businesses with six or less people.” Stephanie Pagel, class of 2006, works at Phantastic Dental in Las Vegas. She works 4 days a week and makes $62,400. –Randy Bauer, C.D.T., TSTC Dental Laboratory
  • 77. “In 2006, demand was off the charts. Every graduate had a job 6 months before graduation. Chemical Technology Graduates typically start at $35K and it is not uncommon for them to make $60K-to-$70K per year.” –Robert Hernandez, TSTC Chemical Technology
  • 78. “TSTC grads’ entry- level pay is $32K-to- $44K per year. They make a lot more because they get double-time after 9 hours of OT. My lowest paid tech made ~$69K, the average was ~$85K and the highest paid was ~$120K.” –Nat Lopez, AT&T Network Services
  • 79. Specialized Jobs Multi-Skill Jobs What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 80. “In this plant, in the next three years we will need nine Instrumentation and Numerical Control (INC) technicians.” Edward C. Trump Plant Manager Entergy 4/2007, TSTC Marshall
  • 81. Unskilled Operators Highly Skilled Operators What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 82. Our Goal?
  • 83. www.tstc.edu Forecasting.tstc.edu … of offering critical and emerging technologies, TSTC is leading a consortium of college and industry partners developing a statewide curriculum in fuel cell technology.
  • 84. forecasting.tstc.edu
  • 85. The Future is Here! Science and Technology Jobs and Workforce Making the shift to how
  • 86. Education, Workforce, Economic Development and Industry Silos What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students? Innovation Systems
  • 87. Next Generation Technopolis • Merging workforce, education, economic development and industry systems to create innovation and innovators • Building networks to move innovation across clusters • Focused on STEM Convergence • Integrating STEM and the ARTS • Building talent pipelines across K-12, CTC, University and Industry Workforce • Working to move IP from lab to market
  • 88. IIMJDr. Michael Shonrock, VP Student Affairs, Texas Tech
  • 89. Bryron Martin ATC Skill Mergers
  • 90. Bryron Martin ATC
  • 91. Lubbock FUTURES Network • To systematically network industry, education, workforce and economic development. • To create an internationally recognized BRAND by achieving CIVIL INNOVATION through collaborative forecasting, research, planning and action. • To grow a world-class culture of innovation, creativity, human capital and leadership. • To link thinking and doing-- TRANSDISCIPLINARY ACTION.
  • 92. Future Farmers of America v2.0
  • 93. Future Farmers of America • Embrace history and culture of agriculture and project into the future BIO, ENGINEERING, LAW, ENTREPRENEURSHIP and FUTURE STUDIES. • Resource K-12 region wide (~80 counties) through curriculum development, evaluation, support, kits, online learning and DISTRIBUTED ATCs. • Move to transdisciplinary model Link theory, application and problems/opportunities from the region/world.
  • 94. “The high school students took over ½ the lab in 2 weeks and provided production tweaks for a birth assist device.” –Dr. Richard Gale, Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • 95. K-12 Collaborations
  • 96. Elementary spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Robot competition plus career and academic exploration and history of science and technology.
  • 97. spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Middle School
  • 98. US First-EISD Andrew Schuetze San Antonio,TX High School
  • 99. How & What Why What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 100. http://images.autodesk.com/emea_design_center/images/4423712_FIRST-Team-342-image-1-gr.jpg 2004, US FIRST Robotics Design Winner Instructor, Kalameja, Trident Technical College, Charleston, SC, USA
  • 101. spaceTEAMS
  • 102. Space Teams, ACCD
  • 103. Space Teams, ACCD
  • 104. Space Teams, ACCD
  • 105. K-8
  • 106. High School
  • 107. CTC
  • 108. Work
  • 109. AIM
  • 110. TSTC K-12 Collaborations Billie Becker and Diana Gafford
  • 111. Doing what we have always done… Moving current learning science into the classroom What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 112. CTE is for a select group of students Integration of CTE , general academics and the arts is greater than the sum of its parts What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 113. Willard R. Daggett, Ed.D., President of the International Center for Leadership in Education Academics ARTSCTE America’s Top Performing Schools
  • 114. Lower Rio Grande Valley o College transition rates, all students: 56.7% o College transition rates, Tech Prep (2005 cohort): 65.7% State of Texas o College transition rates, all students: 55.3% o College transition rates (2005 cohort): Tech Prep: 55.6% Source: High School College Linkages, THECB Fall 2006 Preliminary Enrollment, (2005-2006 Data), in Patricia G. (Pat) Bubb 18% Increase in College Attendance
  • 115. Marty Thompson, Career & Technical Director and Dean of Advanced Technology Complex; Denton ISD
  • 116. To Provide an advanced educational environment which facilitates student pursuit of : • Licensures/Certifications • College Credits through Dual Credit • DAP (Distinguished Achievement Plan) • Knowledge/skills that will increase earning potential and better prepare students for post-secondary college and career goals
  • 117. 21st Century Teacher
  • 118. Can you make the shift?
  • 119. DMC Lab Project: Medical Leadership Trainer - Scenario Authoring Engine “Joe Medic” UT Austin DMC and Fort Sam Houston AMED NCO Academy
  • 120. NETC – 24 Blue (ITSEC 2005)
  • 121. USC ISI and Tactical Language Training (ITSEC 2005)
  • 122. Case study: Emergency Response Training, Pjotr van Schothorst VSTEP BV, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  • 123. $7.5 million project that immerses students in the hectic environment of a hospital's intensive care unit and places them in a first-person role as a health-care professional. Funded by the U.S. Office of Naval Research, Pulse!! is being developed by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, which in turn hired Hunt Valley (Md.)-based BreakAway to produce and design the platform. –Business Week http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/apr2006/id20060410_051875.htm Pulse!!
  • 124. Enlight Software, the Jackson Hole Higher Education Group, and the Institute for Research on Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania (data), with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the Spencer Foundation. www.virtual-u.org
  • 125. Virtual-u.org
  • 126. Population: 1.4MM Growth: 1200/day Educational Sites 3 - 5 minutes EA online games 9 minutes AOL Entertainment 10 minutes Whyville.net 59 minutes Yahoo! Games 78 minutes MEAN TIME PER USER LOGIN Discovery.com: 96 million Whyville.net: 58.4 million BigChalk: 11 million Time for Kids: 8 million New York Times Learning Net: 1.2 million Cosmogirl: 425,000 PAGE VIEWS ©numedeon,inc.2003 The average time per log in July was 3.8 hours making it second to Neopets.
  • 127. Playing Games Building Games What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 128. The Future is Here! Science and Technology Jobs and Workforce Making the shift to how
  • 129. Why How What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 130. The Future is Here! Jim Brazell jim@ventureramp.com 210-381-2835
  • 131. 3Ds, Lay-offs and Outsourcing Perception Shift What shifts will we have to make in order to increase options for students?
  • 132. A TEXAS WORKFORCE SOLUTIONA TEXAS WORKFORCE SOLUTION