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  • Cooper first cellular mobile phone in 1973
    In simple terms, Moore’s Law states that the number of transistors that can be packed on an integrated electronic circuit doubles approximately every 2 years
    (ftp://download.intel.com/research/silicon/moorespaper.pdf
    ) enabling a size: price: performance ratio of smaller, cheaper and more powerful micro electronics. Law of Disruption states that “social, political, and economic systems change incrementally, but technology changes exponentially
    Metcalfe’s Law Value of a network increases proportionally with the square of the number of connections
    BY RAO R. TUMMALA // JUNE 2006
    Remember when combining a camera with a cellphone seemed daring? Or adding a cellphone to a PDA? Such technical tricks relied on Moore's Law, which holds that the number of transistors on an IC doubles every 18 months. In the computing world, having more transistors on a chip means more speed and possibly more functions.But in many cases, those Moore's Law ICs deal with only 10 percent of the system. The other 90 percent is still there, showing up as an array of bulky discrete passive components--such as resistors, capacitors, inductors, antennas, filters, and switches--interconnected over a printed-circuit board or two. Real miniaturization requires something more, and we have it in the system-on-package (SOP) approach we're pursuing at the Microsystems Packaging Research Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology, in Atlanta. SOP leapfrogs well beyond Moore's Law. It combines ICs with micrometer-scale thin-film versions of discrete components, and it embeds everything in a new type of package so small that eventually handhelds will become anythingfrom multi- to megafunction devices [see illustration, preceding page]. SOP products will be developed not just for wireless communications, computing, and entertainment. Outfitted with sensors, SOPs could be used to detect all manner of substances, toxic and benign, including chemicals in the environment, in food, and in the human body.
    This last application will see the convergence of biology, chemistry, and digital technology to produce capsules small enough to be introduced into the human body to monitor personal health daily. A capsule could be used, for example, to check vital signs and monitor parameters such as glucose levels, blood pressure, and even signs of cancer. The capsule would then wirelessly communicate the person's health status to a Web terminal outside the body or, via the Internet, to a physician (or to anyone, anywhere). Fitted with a reservoir, the capsule could also deliver drugs at programmed intervals to selected places within the body.
    That tiny body capsule is certainly a compelling product, and we can expect many others. Imagine, for example, a home entertainment and control hub--a device that combines voice, video, data, sensing, and control functions. It could include a home computer, a cellphone, environmental and other sensors, a health monitoring device, and a satellite TV receiver, to name just some possibilities. A wireless broadband connection would link the system to the Internet, and the hub would serve as the remote control for all the home's appliances.
    Yet the hub would be as small as a credit card.
    We envision a megafunction SOP unit built with microscale components that would be the size of an Intel Pentium processor, which comes in a flat pack 35 centimeters on a side. Or, built with nanoscale technologies, an SOP could be as small as a millimeter on a side. SOP products will attain such small sizes because the technology attacks the 90 percent of the system--the so-called 90 percent problem--that is not integrated [see diagram, " Many in One"].
    In a cellphone, for example, that 90 percent typically adds up to some 400 discrete passive components and their metal interconnections, all fastened to a relatively large printed-circuit board. And, of course, some systems will have thousands of discrete components sitting on circuit boards.
    SOP technology represents a radically different approach to systems. It shrinks bulky circuit boards with their many components and makes them nearly disappear. In effect, SOP sets up a new law for system integration. It holds that as the components shrink and the boards all but disappear, the component density will double every year or so, and the number of system functions in an SOP package will increase in the same proportion. Thus, SOP technology yields far more in system miniaturization than can be expected from Moore's Law, which deals only with transistors in ICs [see graph below, "Growing Faster"].
    GROWING FASTER
    System integration using system-on-package (SOP) technology from Georgia Tech's Microsystems Packaging Research Center will see "More Than Moore's Law" take hold, as measured by component density. From about 50 components per square centimeter in 2004, component density will climb to about a million per square centimeter by 2020. Functional system density will escalate similarly.
    Squeezing so much into tiny spaces is our mission at Georgia Tech. If we have our way, products will shrink by much more than the factor of 10 typically expected every few years now. Instead, they will shrink by factors of many hundreds and even thousands in the same time frame.
    We began this research in 1993 with a proposal to the U.S. National Science Foundation for an Engineering Research Center, which the NSF then funded. Today we are not alone in this endeavor: researchers around the world are using SOP to combine diverse technologies in new, unusual, and cost-effective ways. Everyone is after ultracompact products built with any combination of digital, analog, radio-frequency, and even optical circuitry, as well as a variety of sensors.
  • The goal of the Smart Dust project is to build a self-contained, millimeter-scale sensing and communication platform for a massively distributed sensor network.  This device will be around the size of a grain of sand and will contain sensors, computational ability, bi-directional wireless communications, and a power supply, while being inexpensive enough to deploy by the hundreds.  The science and engineering goal of the project is to build a complete, complex system in a tiny volume using state-of-the art technologies (as opposed to futuristic technologies), which will require evolutionary and revolutionary advances in integration, miniaturization, and energy management.  We forsee many applications for this technology:
    Weather/seismological monitoring on Mars
    Internal spacecraft monitoring
    Land/space comm. networks
    Chemical/biological sensors
    Weapons stockpile monitoring
    Defense-related sensor networks
    Inventory Control
    Product quality monitoring
    Smart office spaces
    Sports - sailing, balls
    For more information, see the main Smart Dust page at http://robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu/~pister/SmartDust and read our publications (see navigation button above).
    Brief description of the operation of the mote:
    The Smart Dust mote is run by a microcontroller that not only determines the tasks performed by the mote, but controls power to the various components of the system to conserve energy. Periodically the microcontroller gets a reading from one of the sensors, which measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure, processes the data, and stores it in memory. It also occasionally turns on the optical receiver to see if anyone is trying to communicate with it. This communication may include new programs or messages from other motes. In response to a message or upon its own initiative the microcontroller will use the corner cube retroreflector or laser to transmit sensor data or a message to a base station or another mote.
    Longer description of the operation of the mote:
    The primary constraint in the design of the Smart Dust motes is volume, which in turn puts a severe constraint on energy since we do not have much room for batteries or large solar cells. Thus, the motes must operate efficiently and conserve energy whenever possible. Most of the time, the majority of the mote is powered off with only a clock and a few timers running. When a timer expires, it powers up a part of the mote to carry out a job, then powers off. A few of the timers control the sensors that measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure. When one of these timers expires, it powers up the corresponding sensor, takes a sample, and converts it to a digital word. If the data is interesting, it may either be stored directly in the SRAM or the microcontroller is powered up to perform more complex operations with it. When this task is complete, everything is again powered down and the timer begins counting again.
    Another timer controls the receiver. When that timer expires, the receiver powers up and looks for an incoming packet. If it doesn't see one after a certain length of time, it is powered down again. The mote can receive several types of packets, including ones that are new program code that is stored in the program memory. This allows the user to change the behavior of the mote remotely. Packets may also include messages from the base station or other motes. When one of these is received, the microcontroller is powered up and used to interpret the contents of the message. The message may tell the mote to do something in particular, or it may be a message that is just being passed from one mote to another on its way to a particular destination. In response to a message or to another timer expiring, the microcontroller will assemble a packet containing sensor data or a message and transmit it using either the corner cube retroreflector or the laser diode, depending on which it has. The corner cube retroreflector transmits information just by moving a mirror and thus changing the reflection of a laser beam from the base station. This technique is substantially more energy efficient than actually generating some radiation. With the laser diode and a set of beam scanning mirrors, we can transmit data in any direction desired, allowing the mote to communicate with other Smart Dust motes.
  • Vitruvian Man
  • The most important thing to understand about Whyville really, is that it’s a place full of kids. It’s a virtual city that belongs to the kids who come from all over the world to have fun. The kids consider this their own town, and they call themselves Whyvillians.
    To become a Whyvillian, you create a Whyville persona. In this screen, and every other screen you’ve already seen, for example, each face is a Whyville citizen. To become a Whyville citizen, you create a persona, the most important aspect of which is your face.
    You can see here that the faces are varied and very creative. Here’s an amoeba. Here’s someone driving a car. Here is someone wearing a style known as ‘Goth’. The ungliest citizens you see around are in fact us, the city workers.
  • Whyville has its own system of self governance
  • Vitruvian Man
  • We have a lot of competition
    DCI is not unique in this mission. There are many strong competitors out there. Descriptions of some of the strengths of these regions available in DCI report available on line.
  • Defense, Aerospace, Homeland Security, Information Technology, Microelectronics, Modeling, Simulation and Training, Video Games, Optics/Photonics, New Media/Film and Medical Technologies5
  • Vitruvian Man
  • Vitruvian Man
  • Defense, Aerospace, Homeland Security, Information Technology, Microelectronics, Modeling, Simulation and Training, Video Games, Optics/Photonics, New Media/Film and Medical Technologies5
  • Defense, Aerospace, Homeland Security, Information Technology, Microelectronics, Modeling, Simulation and Training, Video Games, Optics/Photonics, New Media/Film and Medical Technologies5
  • Defense, Aerospace, Homeland Security, Information Technology, Microelectronics, Modeling, Simulation and Training, Video Games, Optics/Photonics, New Media/Film and Medical Technologies5
  • Defense, Aerospace, Homeland Security, Information Technology, Microelectronics, Modeling, Simulation and Training, Video Games, Optics/Photonics, New Media/Film and Medical Technologies5
  • Korean “Information Society” development date back to the 1980’s, however, Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) use and production in the past has been associated with equipment, rather than knowledge-intensive production and services such as software, biotechnology, new media and information services (Hwang, Hur and Choi, 2004, p.11) (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (Wong, 2004, p.1). A new phase of public-private partnership including programs such as “Cyber Korea 21”, “e-Korea Vision 2006”, and “Broadband IT KOREA VISION 2007” aims to make Korea the leading exporter of knowledge-intensive production in the world (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (The Korea Times in Swiss Talents, 2004, p.1). This new phase is marked by a transition to integrating convergent information services into the fabric of society, industry, government and education; pioneering the development of technologies, products, services and knowledge-based exports; and supporting the formation and development of new convergence companies.
  • Korean “Information Society” development date back to the 1980’s, however, Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) use and production in the past has been associated with equipment, rather than knowledge-intensive production and services such as software, biotechnology, new media and information services (Hwang, Hur and Choi, 2004, p.11) (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (Wong, 2004, p.1). A new phase of public-private partnership including programs such as “Cyber Korea 21”, “e-Korea Vision 2006”, and “Broadband IT KOREA VISION 2007” aims to make Korea the leading exporter of knowledge-intensive production in the world (Korea National Computerization Agency, 2004, p.7) (The Korea Times in Swiss Talents, 2004, p.1). This new phase is marked by a transition to integrating convergent information services into the fabric of society, industry, government and education; pioneering the development of technologies, products, services and knowledge-based exports; and supporting the formation and development of new convergence companies.
  • LATIN RENISSANCE – George Cisneros
  • Transcript

    • 1. TEAMS Part 1 – Pandora’s X-Box: Video Games Virtual Worlds and Mixed Reality, 11:30-12:30 FRI TEAMS Part 2 – TEAMS: Connecting the Dots Across CTE, STEM and the ARTS, 2:30-3:30 FRI TEAMS Part 3 – The Future is Now! Preparing Students for Today’s 3.0 World, 8:00-9:00 SAT
    • 2. Skill Mergers ? Mars Opportunity Rover
    • 3. Burns Cliff Image NASA/JPL
    • 4. March 25, 2014 Courtesy of Charmed Labs
    • 5. March 25, 2014 Courtesy of Charmed Labs Gigapan viewer demonstration
    • 6. gigapan.org
    • 7. Zoomgigapan.org
    • 8. http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=7572 “Communications thinker Marshall McLuhan gave us the phrases the ‘medium is the message’ and ‘global village’. Today, with the explosion of electronic technologies and on-line communication, his ideas are more relevant than ever.” --Forward Through the Rearview Mirror Reflections on and by Marshall McLuhan Edited by Paul Benedetti and Nancy DeHart
    • 9. What is the message?
    • 10. The future is here. Technology is moving so fast, you can watch the science fiction imagination manifest in the rearview mirror….
    • 11. http://www.arraycomm.com/pcct/coopers_law.htm Moore’s Law - Shrink volume by 109 increase transistor density by 109 Martin Cooper’s Law - the no. of conversations (voice and data) conducted over a given area, in all of the useful radio spectrum has doubled every 21/2 years for the last 105 years since Marconi, 1895. Cooper’s Law 1st Gen  Mainframe 2nd Gen Mini 3rd Gen PC 4th Gen Sys on Chip
    • 12. In 1994 a single super computer with the power of an X-box did not exist.
    • 13. http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ Berkeley’s Golem Dust 11.7 mm3 total circumscribed volume ~4.8 mm3 total displaced volume Berkeley’s Deputy Dust 6.6 mm3 total circumscribed volume 4th Gen 11.7 mm3 6.6 mm3
    • 14. Integrates sensors, batteries, a control chip, and an RF transmitter in a 35mm-long housing. Lab-in-a-Pill http://www.olympus.co.jp/en/news/2004b/nr041130capsle.cfm University of Glasgow Capsule Endoscope Examine the lining of the middle part of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes the three portions of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum). 4th GEN
    • 15. Math Engineering TechScience STEM Key Driving Force
    • 16. Government Economy EducationBusiness STEM Impacts Everything Civil Society
    • 17. At the current pace of science and technology, we need to shift to organizing for innovation, adaptation and survival.
    • 18. Innovation is a function of moving within, among and beyond the disciplines, solving real world problems and integrating theory and applied techniques to create new knowledge, tools, processes, systems, environments, etc. In a word transdisciplinarity.
    • 19. Applied Problem Solving Real World Knowledge Transdisciplinarity Moving within, among and beyond the disciplines to solve real world problems and opportunities.
    • 20. http://www.philisoft.com/personal/misc/davinci/davinci-1600x1200.jpg Da Vinci Minds Bob Allen, ideas, “polymaths” John Sealey Brown, PARC, “Bricolage Reasoning”
    • 21. TEAMS Part 1 – Pandora’s X-Box: Video Games Virtual Worlds and Mixed Reality, 11:30-12:30 FRI TEAMS Part 2 – TEAMS: Connecting the Dots Across CTE, STEM and the ARTS, 2:30-3:30 FRI TEAMS Part 3 – The Future is Now! Preparing Students for Today’s 3.0 World, 8:00-9:00 SAT
    • 22. Why games for educational innovation? Who are the model game- innovation communities organizing TEAMS? Jim Brazell, Jim.brazell@ventureramp.com
    • 23. Math Engineering TechScience Why GAMES? The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    • 24. Through mixing realities, research is expanding the potential of embedded training in the field and in battle labs to provide integrated training anytime, anywhere. Advancements are being transferred across industries from business prototypes to hospitality training. Integrated research in tracking, registration, rendering, display, and scenario delivery are expanding the possibilities of CONSTRUCTIVE simulation as well as after action review, and command and control visualizations.
    • 25. Marriage of Visual Fidelity, Procedural Fidelity & Mixed Reality
    • 26. MS Flight Simulator 10
    • 27. Procedural Fidelity
    • 28. Mixed Reality
    • 29. Fail-Safe
    • 30. Marriage of Real World Systems, Simulation, Ed Tech and Assessment
    • 31. Digital Warrior & Joe Medic 2004-2006
    • 32. DMC Lab Project: Medical Leadership Trainer - Scenario Authoring Engine “Joe Medic” UT Austin DMC and Fort Sam Houston AMED NCO Academy
    • 33. Recommendation #1: Increase emphasis on evaluating the effectiveness of new learning technologies and approaches to designing and implementing such systems. Use an adaptive learning approach that integrates real world problems, data, processes and systems; empirical research and human performance; and instructional design and delivery. The key is to integrate empirical research into the design and implementation of new modes of learning in order to inform future selection and variation of learning systems. This requirement is also shared by the US Department of Education (DOE) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) in its efforts toward educational reform especially in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).
    • 34. Improved Target Acquisition System Trainer
    • 35. Forward Observer
    • 36. Nuclear, Biological, Chemical Reconnaissance Vehicle
    • 37. Action-Reaction- Feedback-Adaptation
    • 38. Action-Reaction-Feedback
    • 39. Students will use the America's Army gaming technology to explore kinematics in a ballistics project. They will be able to test the accuracy of their calculations in the virtual environment to observe how different variables such as displacement, time, velocity and elevation angles affect the principles of engineering. Students will be able to visualize a parabola trajectory and calculate the varied velocities, ranges, and angles of their device within the game. Students will also be able to 'drive' a vehicle around a virtual obstacle course as well as perform a virtual helicopter drop and determine how various factors will affect the physics of the activity. "Emerging research indicates that rich virtual simulation does increase student mastery, especially in technical studies," said Richard Grimsley, PLTW Vice President for Programs. After an initial pilot in the state of Ohio, the modules will be incorporated into Project Lead the Way's teacher training system for deployment in all pre-engineering classes throughout the country in the 2009-2010 academic year.
    • 40. First Person Dynamic Stories
    • 41. Daily Unique Users: 300K Growth: 3,000/day Educational Sites 3 - 5 minutes EA online games 9 minutes AOL Entertainment 10 minutes Whyville.net 59 minutes Yahoo! Games 78 minutes MEAN TIME PER USER LOGIN Discovery.com: 96 million Whyville.net: 58.4 million BigChalk: 11 million Time for Kids: 8 million New York Times Learning Net: 1.2 million Cosmogirl: 425,000 PAGE VIEWS ©numedeon,inc.2003 The average time per log in July was 3.8 hours making it second to Neopets.
    • 42. More children vote in whyville elections per capita than US elections. ©numedeon,inc.2004 Whyville Senators OrEoBaBy Sooner
    • 43. Enables training for lessons that are too dangerous, costly or difficult to recreate in the real world.
    • 44. Mass Casualty Triage Rapid physical assessment of key physiologic conditions Provides objective & systematic method for determining patient acuity Simulation-Based Triage Training, Games for Health: Mass Casualty Care Panel , RTI International
    • 45. Simulation-Based Triage Training, Games for Health: Mass Casualty Care Panel , RTI International
    • 46. Simulation-Based Triage Training, Games for Health: Mass Casualty Care Panel , RTI International
    • 47. Simulation-Based Triage Training, Games for Health: Mass Casualty Care Panel , RTI International
    • 48. Mar 25, 2014
    • 49. Blended Learning
    • 50. http://thewe.cc/thewe_/images_5/-/child-labor/two-child-workers-eating-lunchi.jpe
    • 51. seriousgames.dk
    • 52. Layers and learning objectives Content (Central problems in around the world): Experience central problems in the region through real personal accounts. Themes (Human rights. corruption & new democracies): Learn about the role of human rights, corruption and new democracies in global conflicts. Methods (Source criticism & structuring arguments): Learn to be dig out relevant information, the agenda of sources, and article writing. Competences (Perspective-taking, critical thinking & bias awareness): Learn about the importance of digging deep while thinking critically of bias as you are presented with a variety of perspectives. Serious Games Interactive | www.seriousgames.dk | sales@seriousgames.dk Design principles
    • 53. Teaching form Teacher talks Play Game Plenum Group discussions  Read topic overview  Overview of theme  Explore perspectives  Experience issues  Discuss experiences  Write article  Debriefing  Evaluation How to use the series  Teacher manual  Topic overview  Other curriculum  Mission sheets  Work sheets  Online resources Serious Games Interactive | www.seriousgames.dk | info@seriousgames.dk
    • 54. Different rooms for learning styles Group work Reflective observation Active experimentation GC: Palestine Lecture Abstract concepts Concrete experiences •Kolb’s cycle covered with different teaching forms in the course. • The teacher is crucial to facilitate a full learning experience. Pedagogy
    • 55. Significant overlap in software of game design and engineering, architecture, film, print, etc.
    • 56. Game Builders
    • 57. Big Sesh Studios Austin, TX
    • 58. Matt Stubbingtion Game Artist Austin, TX
    • 59. BigSesh Studios Austin, TX
    • 60. $7.5 million project that immerses students in the hectic environment of a hospital's intensive care unit and places them in a first-person role as a health-care professional. Funded by the U.S. Office of Naval Research, Pulse!! is being developed by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, which in turn hired Hunt Valley (Md.)-based BreakAway to produce and design the platform. –Business Week http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/apr2006/id20060410_051875.htm MS&GModeling, Simulation & Gaming (MS&G)
    • 61. Big Sesh Studios Austin, TX defenselink.mil/news/Jul2004/n07272004_2004072705.html Engineering Design
    • 62. Engineering Design: Georgia-Michigan-Texas Dassault Systems
    • 63. Math Engineering TechScience ARTS Brazell, 2006 How are young game builders organizing?
    • 64. Math Engineering TechScience TEAMS What are they learning? Brazell, 2006
    • 65. Scientist Engineer Technologist Technician Artist Architect Industrial Designer Electronic Artist
    • 66. http://www.philisoft.com/personal/misc/davinci/davinci-1600x1200.jpg Da Vinci Minds Bob Allen, ideas, “polymaths” John Sealey Brown, PARC, “Bricolage Reasoning”
    • 67. Demand Pull
    • 68. GAME TEAMS Games have captured millennials imagination and time. Leverage the attention economy of games to develop next generation workforce. We need to pierce the veil of play and support game-based constructivist learning. Transdisciplinarity is the common denominator. Games NANO BIO INFO NEURO Game Builder = System Builder Educational Pull
    • 69. 3D Square and LITE, Arts, STEM & IT Digital Workforce Initiative, Lafayette, Louisiana
    • 70. 3D Square Arts, STEM & IT Digital Workforce Initiative, Lafayette, Louisiana
    • 71. 3D Square and LITE, Arts, STEM & IT Digital Workforce Initiative, Lafayette, Louisiana
    • 72. Game Building is a Mirror of Key 21st Century KSAO
    • 73. Forecasting.TSTC.edu
    • 74. Learning, problem solving and production in one act resulting in creation of new knowledge, processes, systems, and language. Source: Brazell, Jim, Nicholaus Kim, Honoria Starbuck, Eliza Evans, and Michael Bettersworth. Gaming: A Technology Forecast, Implications for Texas Community and Technical Colleges Austin, Texas: Texas State Technical College System and IC2 Institute, University of Texas Austin, 2004. ISBN 0978677358 Table of Contents: http://www.system.tstc.edu/forecasting/reports/dgames.asp
    • 75. Creation of new knowledge, processes & systems. Game Building is Transdisciplinary
    • 76. VIDEO GAME BUILDER KSAO • Integrate artistic design and problem solving with STEM disciplines • Design Object-Oriented systems, write computer code and use computer design tools • Use systems theory to design, learn and problem solve • Innovate using story, game theory and simulation • Integrate two or more academic disciplines within a field of practice • Work and learn in synchronous and asynchronous network environments • Create systems across physical, virtual and imaginary worlds • Communicate and collaborate in multidisciplinary teams
    • 77. STEM, IT & Arts Position Todd Burgassani National STEM GAMES Grand Challenge
    • 78. Source: Brazell, Jim, Nicholaus Kim, Honoria Starbuck, Eliza Evans, and Michael Bettersworth. Gaming: A Technology Forecast, Implications for Texas Community and Technical Colleges Austin, Texas: Texas State Technical College System and IC2 Institute, University of Texas Austin, 2004. ISBN 0978677358 Table of Contents: http://www.system.tstc.edu/forecasting/reports/dgames.asp
    • 79. Applied Problem Solving Real World Knowledge Transdisciplinarity Moving within, among and beyond the disciplines to solve real world problems and opportunities.
    • 80. Why games for educational innovation? Who are the model game- innovation communities organizing TEAMS? Jim Brazell, Jim.brazell@ventureramp.com
    • 81. Math Engineering TechScience Who? The fundamental question of the 21st century is how do we organize and produce innovation?
    • 82. STEM, IT, Arts Integration Leaders US Digital Convergence Centers • New York City • Washington DC MSA • Central Florida • San Francisco/Silicon Valley • Los Angeles • San Diego MSA • Phoenix • Denver • Las Vegas • Austin-San Antonio- Waco Global Digital Convergence Centers • South Korea • Finland • China • Taiwan • Sweden • Denmark • Germany • UK • Israel • Malaysia • Japan Evans, Eliza, Michael Sekora, Alexander Cavalli, Kinman Chan, Jeeyoung Heo Kenneth Kan, Yue Kuang, Prakash Mohandas, Xiaoxiang Zhang, and Jim Brazell. Digital Convergence Initiative: Creating Sustainable Competitive Advantage in Texas. San Marcos, Texas: Greater Austin- San Antonio Corridor Council, 2005. Full Report: http://www.dcitexas.org/DCI_report.pdf
    • 83. NEURO CHEM BIOIT Convergence Technopoleis DESIGN
    • 84. Aerospace, Defense & Security Electronics & Telecom Medical Tech-Life Science Optics/ Photonics Edtech & MS&T Film/ New Media Central Florida DCI MST&G
    • 85. Math Engineering TechScience TEAMS TEAMS Pathway 8th – 20th Grade Brazell, 2006
    • 86. Ocoee Demonstration Middle School
    • 87. Orlando Tech – High School Program
    • 88. Orlando Tech – High School Program
    • 89. Orlando Tech – High School Program
    • 90. Orlando FIEA University Program
    • 91. “techCAMP” Introduces CFL Teachers to Simulation Industry Tuesday, 11 December 2007 Through presentations from academic, industrial and military simulation experts, 43 teachers were introduced to the world of simulation and its related technologies. As part of the program, the teachers visited the Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation & Education Conference at the Orange County Convention Center, were given physics simulation software to use in their classrooms, and had the opportunity to experience hands-on lessons about the Modeling, Simulation & Training (MS&T) industry. Program arms educators with tools to interest students in high tech careers http://www.simulationinformation.com/cms/index2.php?option=com_content&do_pdf=1&id=957
    • 92. Aerospace, Defense & Security Electronics & Telecom Medical Tech-Life Science Optics/ Photonics Edtech & MS&T Film/ New Media San Diego County DCI MST&G
    • 93. First Flight 3 of 6 Dave Kenny
    • 94. Aerospace, Defense & Security Electronics & Telecom Medical Tech-Life Science Optics/ Photonics Edtech & MS&T Instrumentation DC MSA GAMES military-industrial-academic-life science-entertainment spurred by
    • 95. http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/NR/rdonlyres/E4BE30EF-C723-4A04-9D6E-DFDBEF67DE7F/18555/CTEBook101509.pdf “In Simulation and Gaming students advance their understanding and skill level in computer game design and interactive programming.”
    • 96. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&ct=res&cd=4&ved=0CA4QFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fmarylandpublicschools.org%2FNR%2Frdonlyres%2FF8A34712-B21E- 4DC2-A186-9144565375F2%2F18653%2FInteractiveMediaProduction1.doc&ei=Un-JS-q-BM-UtgfE2q3qBA&usg=AFQjCNFQAC-ugwuadBCFC85DDoJsxmRIzA
    • 97. AI & Visualization Microelectronics & Instrumentation Biotech- Health- Medical Telecom- Optics- Photonics Art- New Media- Design Semiconductors Finland DCI MST&G
    • 98. Aerospace, Defense & Security Electronics & Telecom Broadcast Equipment Optics/ Photonics New Media/ Animation Semiconductors South Korea DCI MST&G
    • 99. transitioning from a manufacturing to an innovation economy http://mit.edu/cre/research/ncc/proceedings/ncc-casestudies.pdf
    • 100. e-Korea Vision 2006 also set the following basic directions: · From Quantitative Expansion to Qualitative Accomplishments such as the increase in productivity through legal and institutional reforms and innovations in business processes throughout society…Social transformation not just technical. · From Creation of new industries led by the government to Foundation for new industries. The government’s new role is to focus on the enabling environment and the private sector will be developing new independent and creative industries… Bottom up and top down organization for innovation. · From Catch-up Strategy to Leading Strategy - To strengthen competitiveness in IT, the government will increase leading investments in core technologies and strategic services which have the potential to produce significant added value in the future. Innovation leader…. http://www.apdip.net/projects/2003/asian-forum/docs/papers/comparative.pdf
    • 101. INFO UP BIO NANO COGNO SCIENCE ARTS “Roughly 100 million jobs… cross-disciplinary fields.” NII, Business Week, 10.11.2004 UTSA & UTHSC “Latin Rennisance” George Cisneros “$83M Integrated Sciences and Engineering Facility”
    • 102. SwRI, Training, Simulation and Performance Improvement AETC Holodeck Northrop Grumman 2005
    • 103. SpaceTEAMS
    • 104. Elementary spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Robot competition plus career and academic exploration and history of science and technology.
    • 105. spaceTEAMS San Antonio,TX Middle School
    • 106. Gameboy Video Game BRAIN Vision System Lego Actuators and Building Blocks
    • 107. US First-EISD Andrew Schuetze San Antonio,TX High School
    • 108. “spaceTEAMS can return San Antonio to the path of human development and space exploration making it in the realm of possibility that the first person to walk on Mars will be from San Antonio.” --General Robert F. McDermott and Dr. Francis “Duke” Kane
    • 109. Why games for educational innovation? Who are the model game- innovation communities organizing TEAMS? Jim Brazell, Jim.brazell@ventureramp.com
    • 110. http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=7572 “Communications thinker Marshall McLuhan gave us the phrases the ‘medium is the message’ and ‘global village’. Today, with the explosion of electronic technologies and on-line communication, his ideas are more relevant than ever.” --Forward Through the Rearview Mirror Reflections on and by Marshall McLuhan Edited by Paul Benedetti and Nancy DeHart
    • 111. What is the message?
    • 112. Learning Machine
    • 113. Digital Natives
    • 114. Digital Immigrants
    • 115. Millennial Classroom
    • 116. 21st Century Teacher
    • 117. Can you make the shift?
    • 118. TEAMS Part 1 – Pandora’s X-Box: Video Games Virtual Worlds and Mixed Reality, 11:30-12:30 FRI TEAMS Part 2 – TEAMS: Connecting the Dots Across CTE, STEM and the ARTS, 2:30-3:30 FRI TEAMS Part 3 – The Future is Now! Preparing Students for Today’s 3.0 World, 8:00-9:00 SAT

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