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  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • http://www.robotdirectory.org/pics/cakemonster/Nano-Scoop3.jpg
  • Workforce Knowledge and Skill Mergers
    1. Skilled (Blue)-Professional (White)
    2. Mecha-Computers-Electronics
    3. Engineering-Technical-Scientific
    K-12 Mergers
    1. CTE-Gen acad-Arts
    2. Applied, theoretical, contextual
    3. K-12-CTC-University-Industry
    4. Technical-Engineering-Scientific
    TSTC Strategic Mergers
    IT-Mecha-Graphics and all programsa almost
  • Workforce Knowledge and Skill Mergers
    1. Skilled (Blue)-Professional (White)
    2. Mecha-Computers-Electronics
    3. Engineering-Technical-Scientific
    K-12 Mergers
    1. CTE-Gen acad-Arts
    2. Applied, theoretical, contextual
    3. K-12-CTC-University-Industry
    4. Technical-Engineering-Scientific
    TSTC Strategic Mergers
    IT-Mecha-Graphics and all programsa almost
  • Workforce Knowledge and Skill Mergers
    1. Skilled (Blue)-Professional (White)
    2. Mecha-Computers-Electronics
    3. Engineering-Technical-Scientific
    K-12 Mergers
    1. CTE-Gen acad-Arts
    2. Applied, theoretical, contextual
    3. K-12-CTC-University-Industry
    4. Technical-Engineering-Scientific
    TSTC Strategic Mergers
    IT-Mecha-Graphics and all programsa almost
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8
    October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
    http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
    http://todayinspacehistory.wordpress.com/2007/10/04/october-4-1957-the-russians-launch-sputnik/
    LG SPUT IMAGE
    « October 3, 1962 - Sigma 7 launches into orbit, Mercury-Atlas 8October 5, 1929 - Astronaut Richard Gordon, Jr., is born »October 4, 1957 - the Russian’s launch Sputnik
    Ads by GoogleSputnik
    Huge selection, great deals on
    Sputnik items.
    Yahoo.com3D Earth Screensaver
    Watch Realistic Animated 3D Earth
    On Your Desktop. Free Download!
    www.CrawlerTools.com/3DEarth
    The modern space age was birthed on October 4, 1957 when the Soviet’s launched the first man-made object to orbit the Earth, Sputnik.
    Wikipedia says:
    “Sputnik 1 was launched on October 4, 1957. The satellite was 58 cm (about 23 in) in diameter and weighed approximately 83.6 kg (about 183 lb). Each of its elliptical orbits around the Earth took about 96 minutes. Monitoring of the satellite was done by Amateur radio operators. The first long-range flight of the R-7 booster used to launch it had occurred on August 21 and was described in Aviation Week. Sputnik 1 was not visible from Earth but the casing of the R-7 booster, traveling behind it, was.”
    Quotes:
    “Both countries [Russia and the United States] knew that preeminence in space was a condition of their national security. That conviction gave both countries a powerful incentive to strive and compete. The Soviets accomplished many important firsts, and this gave us a great incentive to try harder.
    The space program also accomplished another vital function in that it kept us out of a hot war. It gave us a way to compete technologically, compete as a matter of national will. It may have even prevented World War III, with all the conflict and fighting focused on getting to the moon first, instead of annihilating each other. There’s no evidence of that, but as eyewitness to those events, I think that’s what happened.”
    - American astronaut Scott Carpenter quoted in Into that Silent Sea (p. 138).
    ___________________
    www.globalsecurity.org/.../imint/u-2_tt.htm
    U-2 Product
    SS-6 / Sputnik Launch Pad, Baikonur
    TOP of LAUNCH
    IMAGE
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    However, another event that occurred in the Soviet Union in 1960 is generally recognized as the single greatest disaster in the history of rocketry. The event was not directly related to manned space flight, but to the development of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). In the early days of space flight, both the US and Soviet space programs were very much intertwined with the development of ICBMs. These vehicles were designed to launch nuclear warheads over great distances, leaving no part of the world safe from the threat of nuclear destruction. However, the technologies pioneered for these weapons of war served a secondary purpose of providing the first generation of rockets for space exploration.
    Sputnik on the launch pad being prepared for liftoff
    In fact, the early flights of Sputnik and Yuri Gagarin in the USSR as well as those of Explorer I and John Glenn in the US were all conducted using modified ballistic missiles. The primary Soviet launch vehicle of the period was the R-7 rocket, modified versions of which are still used even today for most Russian space flights. The R-7 was originally developed as an ICBM under the direction of Sergei Korolev, the Soviet Union's pre-eminent rocket designer of the day. The R-7 successfully completed a number of test flights between 1957 and 1959, including launching the first two artificial satellites. While only four examples of the R-7 were ever deployed as ballistic missiles from 1960 to 1968, the same basic design has remained in use throughout the Russian space program. Modern variants of the R-7 continue to launch satellites as well as manned Soyuz flights, and the type had achieved a success rate of nearly 98% in over 1,600 launches by the year 2000.
    _____________
    Apollo 17
    http://www.phys.ncku.edu.tw/~astrolab/mirrors/apod/ap031109.html
    Apollo 17 _ 1
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/GPN-2000-001876.jpg
    Apollo 17 _ 2
    Apollo 17 launch, December 17, 1972:
    http://xpda.com/junkmail/junk162/junk162.htm
    Mars
    http://whyfiles.org/194spa_travel/images/mars.gif
    Moon
    http://www.rc-astro.com/php/phpthumb/cache/phpThumb_cache_rc-astro.com_srcfadbb9057f0dac8e921d1bffc3590ce0_par0ddf367c5f01d9ba090bf356b6761f52_dat1168633826.jpeg
    Kennedy
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.gif
    November 21, 1963
    Dedication Ceremony of the New Facilities of the School of
    Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas
    http://www.historicaldocuments.com/JohnFKennedysLastSpeech.htm
    SPACE TEAMS
    MCD
    KANE
    Toursit
    Russian
    http://science.qj.net/Microsoft-billionaire-joins-ISS-bound-Russian-space-flight/pg/49/aid/88814
    U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi became the world's fifth space tourist - "space flight participant," as officials call them - to go into orbit. Simonyi, who helped developed Microsoft Word, paid US$ 25M for the opportunity to join the crew of the Russian spacecraft Soyuz TMA-10.
    The 58-year-old Hungary-born billionaire is making a 12-day round trip to the International Space Station (ISS). Joining him on the trip were Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Oleg Kotov of the 15th ISS crew. The spacecraft Simonyi and the Russian cosmonauts lifted off from the Bainokur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 11:31 P.M. local time (1:31 P.M. EDT). They are due to dock with the ISS on Monday.
    Simonyi will be treating the current occupants of the ISS to a gourmet meal three days after arriving at the space station. The meal will be held in honor of Cosmonauts' Day, the Russian holiday commemorating Yuri Gagarin's historic 1961 space flight. Everybody else mentioned who prepared the meal so we won't. Suffice to say, she's famous, knows her way around a house, and looked good in orange.
    In this Associated Press photo: In this image made from NASA-TV, U.S. billionaire Charles Simonyi, front row right, flips upside down during a news conference after he, Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, front center, docked at the international space station Monday, April 9, 2007. A Russian-built Soyuz capsule carrying the American billionaire who helped develop Microsoft Word docked at the international space station late Monday, to the earthbound applause of Martha Stewart and others at Mission Control. In the back row, Commander Michael Lopez-Alegria can be seen. (AP Photo/NASA TV)
    ___________
    Tito
    http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1310822.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1939057D9939C83F106174681002B4CEC415A5397277B4DC33E
    MIR
    http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/people/images/inset-LucidS-5-large.jpg
    http://csatweb.csatolna.hu/tagok/csa/mars/rover.jpg
    RICHS TECHNOLOGY CAMERA - BODY
    HAWKING
    http://gozerog.com/images/Hawking_001.jpg
    Public Domain. Suggested credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration via pingnews.
    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Noted physicist Stephen Hawking (center) enjoys zero gravity during a flight aboard a modified Boeing 727 aircraft owned by Zero Gravity Corp. (Zero G). Hawking, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is being rotated in air by (right) Peter Diamandis, founder of the Zero G Corp., and (left) Byron Lichtenberg, former shuttle payload specialist and now president of Zero G. Kneeling below Hawking is Nicola O'Brien, a nurse practitioner who is Hawking's aide. At the celebration of his 65th birthday on January 8 this year, Hawking announced his plans for a zero-gravity flight to prepare for a sub-orbital space flight in 2009 on Virgin Galactic's space service. Additional information from source:
    No copyright protection is asserted for this photograph. If a recognizable person appears in this photograph, use for commercial purposes may infringe a right of privacy or publicity. It may not be used to state or imply the endorsement by NASA employees of a commercial product, process or service, or used in any other manner that might mislead. Accordingly, it is requested that if this photograph is used in advertising and other commercial promotion, layout and copy be submitted to NASA prior to release.
    Source Physicist Stephen Hawking in Zero Gravity (NASA)
    Date April 27, 2007 at 22:11
    Zero Gravity's price tag for the daylong tour is $2,950, which includes preflight training and a postflight party.
    From the Go Zero G Website:
    The once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to fly like Superman can now be yours. Train with an expert coach, board our specially modified aircraft, G-FORCE ONE, and experience the unforgettable.
    Experience zero gravity the only way possible without going to space. Parabolic flight is the same method NASA has used to train its astronauts for the last 45 years and the same way Tom Hanks floated in Apollo 13.
    Book a seat on one of our regular flights conveniently based in Las Vegas, Nevada and at the Kennedy Space Center, near Orlando, Florida. The aircraft is also available for charter flights anywhere in the United States for groups, incentive trips, parties or team building.
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Need source
  • Need source
  • Need source
  • The Invisible Train
    The Invisible Train is the first real multi-user Augmented Reality application for handheld devices (PDAs). Unlike other projects, in which wearable devices were merely used as thin-clients, while powerful (PC-based) servers performed a majority of the computations (such as graphics rendering), our software runs independently on off-the-shelf PDAs - eliminating the need for an expensive infractructure.
     
    The Invisible Train is a mobile, collaborative multi-user Augmented Reality (AR) game, in which players control virtual trains on a real wooden miniature railroad track. These virtual trains are only visible to players through their PDA's video see-through display as they don't exist in the physical world. This type of user interface is commonly called the "magic lens metaphor".
    Players can interact with the game environment by operating track switches and adjusting the speed of their virtual trains. The current state of the game is synchronized between all participants via wireless networking. The common goal of the game is to prevent the virtual trains from colliding.
    The success of the Invisible Train installation illustrates the advantages of our Studierstube software framework, a component-based system architecture that has been designed to accelerate the task of developing and deploying collaborative Augmented Reality applications on handheld devices.
    Why Handheld Augmented Reality?
    Augmented Reality (AR) can naturally complement mobile computing on wearable devices by providing an intuitive interface to a three-dimensional information space embedded within physical reality. However, prior work on mobile Augmented Reality has almost exclusively been undertaken with traditional "backpack"-systems that consist of a notebook computer, an HMD, cameras and additional supporting hardware. Although these systems work well within a constrained laboratory environment, they fail to fulfill several usability criteria to be rapidly deployed to inexperienced users, as they are expensive, cumbersome and require high level of expertise.
    Since the early experiments in Mobile Augmented Reality, a variety of highly portable consumer devices with versatile computing capabilities has emerged. We believe that handheld computers, mobile phones and personal digital assistants have the potential to introduce Augmented Reality to large audiences outside of a constrained laboratory environment. The relative affordability of devices that are capable of running our software framework opens up new possibilities for experimenting with massively multi-user application scenarios - thereby bringing us closer to the goal of "AR anytime, anywhere".
  • The Invisible Train
    The Invisible Train is the first real multi-user Augmented Reality application for handheld devices (PDAs). Unlike other projects, in which wearable devices were merely used as thin-clients, while powerful (PC-based) servers performed a majority of the computations (such as graphics rendering), our software runs independently on off-the-shelf PDAs - eliminating the need for an expensive infractructure.
     
    The Invisible Train is a mobile, collaborative multi-user Augmented Reality (AR) game, in which players control virtual trains on a real wooden miniature railroad track. These virtual trains are only visible to players through their PDA's video see-through display as they don't exist in the physical world. This type of user interface is commonly called the "magic lens metaphor".
    Players can interact with the game environment by operating track switches and adjusting the speed of their virtual trains. The current state of the game is synchronized between all participants via wireless networking. The common goal of the game is to prevent the virtual trains from colliding.
    The success of the Invisible Train installation illustrates the advantages of our Studierstube software framework, a component-based system architecture that has been designed to accelerate the task of developing and deploying collaborative Augmented Reality applications on handheld devices.
    Why Handheld Augmented Reality?
    Augmented Reality (AR) can naturally complement mobile computing on wearable devices by providing an intuitive interface to a three-dimensional information space embedded within physical reality. However, prior work on mobile Augmented Reality has almost exclusively been undertaken with traditional "backpack"-systems that consist of a notebook computer, an HMD, cameras and additional supporting hardware. Although these systems work well within a constrained laboratory environment, they fail to fulfill several usability criteria to be rapidly deployed to inexperienced users, as they are expensive, cumbersome and require high level of expertise.
    Since the early experiments in Mobile Augmented Reality, a variety of highly portable consumer devices with versatile computing capabilities has emerged. We believe that handheld computers, mobile phones and personal digital assistants have the potential to introduce Augmented Reality to large audiences outside of a constrained laboratory environment. The relative affordability of devices that are capable of running our software framework opens up new possibilities for experimenting with massively multi-user application scenarios - thereby bringing us closer to the goal of "AR anytime, anywhere".
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • The goal of the Smart Dust project is to build a self-contained, millimeter-scale sensing and communication platform for a massively distributed sensor network.  This device will be around the size of a grain of sand and will contain sensors, computational ability, bi-directional wireless communications, and a power supply, while being inexpensive enough to deploy by the hundreds.  The science and engineering goal of the project is to build a complete, complex system in a tiny volume using state-of-the art technologies (as opposed to futuristic technologies), which will require evolutionary and revolutionary advances in integration, miniaturization, and energy management.  We forsee many applications for this technology:
    Weather/seismological monitoring on Mars
    Internal spacecraft monitoring
    Land/space comm. networks
    Chemical/biological sensors
    Weapons stockpile monitoring
    Defense-related sensor networks
    Inventory Control
    Product quality monitoring
    Smart office spaces
    Sports - sailing, balls
    For more information, see the main Smart Dust page at http://robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu/~pister/SmartDust and read our publications (see navigation button above).
    Brief description of the operation of the mote:
    The Smart Dust mote is run by a microcontroller that not only determines the tasks performed by the mote, but controls power to the various components of the system to conserve energy. Periodically the microcontroller gets a reading from one of the sensors, which measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure, processes the data, and stores it in memory. It also occasionally turns on the optical receiver to see if anyone is trying to communicate with it. This communication may include new programs or messages from other motes. In response to a message or upon its own initiative the microcontroller will use the corner cube retroreflector or laser to transmit sensor data or a message to a base station or another mote.
    Longer description of the operation of the mote:
    The primary constraint in the design of the Smart Dust motes is volume, which in turn puts a severe constraint on energy since we do not have much room for batteries or large solar cells. Thus, the motes must operate efficiently and conserve energy whenever possible. Most of the time, the majority of the mote is powered off with only a clock and a few timers running. When a timer expires, it powers up a part of the mote to carry out a job, then powers off. A few of the timers control the sensors that measure one of a number of physical or chemical stimuli such as temperature, ambient light, vibration, acceleration, or air pressure. When one of these timers expires, it powers up the corresponding sensor, takes a sample, and converts it to a digital word. If the data is interesting, it may either be stored directly in the SRAM or the microcontroller is powered up to perform more complex operations with it. When this task is complete, everything is again powered down and the timer begins counting again.
    Another timer controls the receiver. When that timer expires, the receiver powers up and looks for an incoming packet. If it doesn't see one after a certain length of time, it is powered down again. The mote can receive several types of packets, including ones that are new program code that is stored in the program memory. This allows the user to change the behavior of the mote remotely. Packets may also include messages from the base station or other motes. When one of these is received, the microcontroller is powered up and used to interpret the contents of the message. The message may tell the mote to do something in particular, or it may be a message that is just being passed from one mote to another on its way to a particular destination. In response to a message or to another timer expiring, the microcontroller will assemble a packet containing sensor data or a message and transmit it using either the corner cube retroreflector or the laser diode, depending on which it has. The corner cube retroreflector transmits information just by moving a mirror and thus changing the reflection of a laser beam from the base station. This technique is substantially more energy efficient than actually generating some radiation. With the laser diode and a set of beam scanning mirrors, we can transmit data in any direction desired, allowing the mote to communicate with other Smart Dust motes.
  • Lab-in-a-Pill – Revolutionising Bowel Cancer Screening
    Sector: Medical Devices
    Technology
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In the western world, colorectal cancer is now the third most frequent cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths. In the US nearly 150,000 new cases are being diagnosed each year and more than 56,000 people died from the disease in 2002. In the UK, where a national screening campaign will be implemented across the 20m population over 50, around 15,000 people die from the disease each year.
    Current screening techniques are notoriously inaccurate, leading to many false positives which saturate resources available for follow-up diagnosis. But scientists at Glasgow University have pioneered a new sensor technology, Lab-in-a-Pill, that could have major impact on the cost and effectiveness of bowel cancer treatment.
    At the core of Lab-in-a-Pill is a miniaturised sensor, processing and communications module all enclosed in a chemical-resistant capsule which currently measures around 3cm x 1cm in prototype form.
    The Lab-in-a-Pill module, which would be sent to all individuals being screened, incorporates a multi-sensor array which includes a blood test. The pill is able to detect blood as it travels through the bowel, transmitting the real time measurements to a small external module worn under a patch attached to the body.
    After one, or more pills have been swallowed over the required screening period, the patch is returned for the measured data to be assessed at the screening centre. So the pills themselves do not have to be recovered making the screening process much more acceptable. And because it measures the location of bleeding Lab-in-a-Pill can identify, more effectively, those individuals who are most at risk.
    The Lab-in-a-Pill concept, currently undergoing in-vitro trials, overcomes the critical difficulties with the current screening scheme which is based on individuals collecting stool samples. Major benefits include:
    • improved compliance and screening response rate with elimination of sample collection
    • reduced false positives and improved sensitivity through measurement at the source of bleeding
    So Lab-in-a-Pill reduces the pressure on valuable national resources by eliminating the need for central screening laboratories and ensuring only at-risk patients are referred for colonoscopy.
    IP Status
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The intellectual property associated with this technology belongs to the University of Glasgow.
    The University of Glasgow is always keen to hear from potential collaborative partners and welcomes interest from genuine parties. If you would like further information about this technology or this area of research please complete the following form and we will get back to you via telephone or email within two working days.
    Enquiry Form
    http://www.innovativelicences.com/index.cfm/page/licensesandtechnologies/technologyid/48
  • Lab-in-a-Pill – Revolutionising Bowel Cancer Screening
    Sector: Medical Devices
    Technology
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In the western world, colorectal cancer is now the third most frequent cancer and the second most common cause of cancer deaths. In the US nearly 150,000 new cases are being diagnosed each year and more than 56,000 people died from the disease in 2002. In the UK, where a national screening campaign will be implemented across the 20m population over 50, around 15,000 people die from the disease each year.
    Current screening techniques are notoriously inaccurate, leading to many false positives which saturate resources available for follow-up diagnosis. But scientists at Glasgow University have pioneered a new sensor technology, Lab-in-a-Pill, that could have major impact on the cost and effectiveness of bowel cancer treatment.
    At the core of Lab-in-a-Pill is a miniaturised sensor, processing and communications module all enclosed in a chemical-resistant capsule which currently measures around 3cm x 1cm in prototype form.
    The Lab-in-a-Pill module, which would be sent to all individuals being screened, incorporates a multi-sensor array which includes a blood test. The pill is able to detect blood as it travels through the bowel, transmitting the real time measurements to a small external module worn under a patch attached to the body.
    After one, or more pills have been swallowed over the required screening period, the patch is returned for the measured data to be assessed at the screening centre. So the pills themselves do not have to be recovered making the screening process much more acceptable. And because it measures the location of bleeding Lab-in-a-Pill can identify, more effectively, those individuals who are most at risk.
    The Lab-in-a-Pill concept, currently undergoing in-vitro trials, overcomes the critical difficulties with the current screening scheme which is based on individuals collecting stool samples. Major benefits include:
    • improved compliance and screening response rate with elimination of sample collection
    • reduced false positives and improved sensitivity through measurement at the source of bleeding
    So Lab-in-a-Pill reduces the pressure on valuable national resources by eliminating the need for central screening laboratories and ensuring only at-risk patients are referred for colonoscopy.
    IP Status
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The intellectual property associated with this technology belongs to the University of Glasgow.
    The University of Glasgow is always keen to hear from potential collaborative partners and welcomes interest from genuine parties. If you would like further information about this technology or this area of research please complete the following form and we will get back to you via telephone or email within two working days.
    Enquiry Form
    http://www.innovativelicences.com/index.cfm/page/licensesandtechnologies/technologyid/48
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/hearing/coch.htm
    What is a cochlear implant?
    Credit: NIH Medical ArtsEar with Cochlear implant. View larger image.A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. The implant consists of an external portion that sits behind the ear and a second portion that is surgically placed under the skin (see figure). An implant has the following parts:
    A microphone, which picks up sound from the environment.
    A speech processor, which selects and arranges sounds picked up by the microphone.
    A transmitter and receiver/stimulator, which receive signals from the speech processor and convert them into electric impulses.
    An electrode array, which is a group of electrodes that collects the impulses from the stimulator and sends them to different regions of the auditory nerve.
    An implant does not restore normal hearing. Instead, it can give a deaf person a useful representation of sounds in the environment and help him or her to understand speech.
    Top
    How does a cochlear implant work?
    A cochlear implant is very different from a hearing aid. Hearing aids amplify sounds so they may be detected by damaged ears. Cochlear implants bypass damaged portions of the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. Signals generated by the implant are sent by way of the auditory nerve to the brain, which recognizes the signals as sound. Hearing through a cochlear implant is different from normal hearing and takes time to learn or relearn. However, it allows many people to recognize warning signals, understand other sounds in the environment, and enjoy a conversation in person or by telephone.
    Top
    Who gets cochlear implants?
    Credit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
    Children and adults who are deaf or severely hard-of-hearing can be fitted for cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) 2005 data, nearly 100,000 people worldwide have received implants. In the United States, roughly 22,000 adults and nearly 15,000 children have received them.
    Adults who have lost all or most of their hearing later in life often can benefit from cochlear implants. They often can associate the sounds made through an implant with sounds they remember. This may help them to understand speech without visual cues or systems such as lipreading or sign language.
    Cochlear implants, coupled with intensive postimplantation therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, developmental, and social skills. Most children who receive implants are between two and six years old. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the FDA lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of cochlear implant.
    Top
    How does someone receive a cochlear implant?
    Use of a cochlear implant requires both a surgical procedure and significant therapy to learn or relearn the sense of hearing. Not everyone performs at the same level with this device. The decision to receive an implant should involve discussions with medical specialists, including an experienced cochlear-implant surgeon. The process can be expensive. For example, a person’s health insurance may cover the expense, but not always. Some individuals may choose not to have a cochlear implant for a variety of personal reasons. Surgical implantations are almost always safe, although complications are a risk factor, just as with any kind of surgery. An additional consideration is learning to interpret the sounds created by an implant. This process takes time and practice. Speech-language pathologists and audiologists are frequently involved in this learning process. Prior to implantation, all of these factors need to be considered.
    Top
    What does the future hold for cochlear implants?
    With advancements in technology and continued follow-up studies with people who already have received implants, researchers are evaluating how cochlear implants might be used for other types of hearing loss.
    NIDCD is supporting research to improve upon the benefits provided by cochlear implants. It may be possible to use a shortened electrode array, inserted into a portion of the cochlea, for individuals whose hearing loss is limited to the higher frequencies. Other studies are exploring ways to make a cochlear implant convey the sounds of speech more clearly. Researchers also are looking at the potential benefits of pairing a cochlear implant in one ear with either another cochlear implant or a hearing aid in the other ear.
  • ITS ROCK-HARD surface can take a full- on assault from a baseball bat, yet remains flexible enough to allow you to kick, leap and roll with perfect ease. Crafted from cutting-edge science, its unique molecular structure means that while providing armoured protection against crude concrete and even barbed wire, it remains light enough to allow you to run at high speed.
    It sounds like the stuff of Batman comics - but the superhero suit is here.
    http://www.sundayherald.com/news/heraldnews/display.var.1528394.0.holy_batcapes_the_age_of_the_superhero_suit_is_upon_us.php
     
     
     
    D30
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • Cybernetics is a theory of the communication and control of regulatory feedback. The term cybernetics stems from the Greek kybernetes (meaning steersman, governor, pilot, or rudder). Cybernetics is the discipline that studies communication and control in living beings and in the machines built by humans.
    A more philosophical definition, suggested in 1958 by Louis Couffignal, one of the pioneers of cybernetics in the 1930s, considers cybernetics as "the art of assuring efficiency of action" (see external links for reference).
  • http://www.robotdirectory.org/pics/cakemonster/Nano-Scoop3.jpg
  • 1 futureis here_governor

    1. 1. The Future is Here: Emerging Technology, Jobs, Curricula, Students and Partnerships
    2. 2. “In West Texas, McDonalds gets 40 applicants for every job and I get one applicant for every 40 jobs. Aviation technicians start at $30,000 per year at American Eagle.” –Harley Hall, American Eagle, Abilene
    3. 3. “The IT computer phenomena of the late 1990’s is prevalent today with technology fields in general. We are seeing high school technical programs go out the window. We are concerned. We are worried.” –Bruce Mabrito,
    4. 4. “Over the next ten years, 26 of the top 30 fastest growing jobs will require some post- secondary education or training...The demand for skilled workers is outpacing supply, resulting in attractive, high-paying jobs going unfilled.” Emily Stover De Rocco Assistant Secretary of Labor for Education and Training
    5. 5. “Over the next ten years, 26 of the top 30 fastest growing jobs will require some post- secondary education or training...The demand for skilled workers is outpacing supply, resulting in attractive, high-paying jobs going unfilled.” Emily Stover De Rocco Assistant Secretary of Labor for Education and Training
    6. 6. “We need to prepare a high tech workforce or we will have to import workers from the outside.” --Mayor Charmain Tavares, Maui
    7. 7. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce What is your biggest challenge? “Workforce… We keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.” –Bryan “We are losing institutional knowledge and skill.” --Jim --Bryan Derreberry, President & CEO & Jim Schwarzenberger, VP
    8. 8. “Workforce development and economic development are the same thing…” --Linda Sorrell, Workforce Center, Wichita
    9. 9. National Institute for Aviation Research “If we don’t have a trained workforce, we’ll create technology and export jobs.” -- John Tomblin, Executive Director Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    10. 10. Butler County Economic Development “In the world of economic development, people talk about the importance of location, location, location… but without the labor force location means nothing.” --David Alfaro, Director Butler County Economic Develoipment Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    11. 11. Regional, State and National Innovation Networks
    12. 12. Co-opetition
    13. 13. “We can’t be in our silos like we have been in the past.” --D Smith, Visioneering Wichita
    14. 14. K-12 Informal Feeders
    15. 15. Technology Jobs E3
    16. 16. 16 Where Are The Jobs? Source: Achieve Texas: Lifelong Success for All Students, p. 3
    17. 17. 17 Where Are The Jobs? Source: Career Pathways: Education with a Purpose, p. 35 Source: Achieve Texas: Lifelong Success for All Students, p. 3 1950 2004
    18. 18. The number of jobs requiring technical training is growing at five times the rate of other occupations. Innovate America, U.S. Council on Competitiveness
    19. 19. Highest Paying Majors 1 Year Post-Graduation: Bachelors & Associates Degrees Only College Major Exit Level Annual Pay 1. Health Professions/Clinical Sciences BA $47,306 2. Engineering BA $45,278 3. Health Professions/Clinical Sciences AAS $44,230 4. Construction Trades AAS $40,120 5. Engineering Technologies/Technicians BA $39,677 6. Science Technologies/ Technicians AAS $37,968 7. Architectural & Related Services AAS $36,737 8. Precision Production AAS $34,167 9. Computer & Information Sciences BA $33,276 10. Business, Mgmt. & Marketing BA $30,851 **Avg. earnings for entire graduating cohort, not for individual graduates
    20. 20. “TSTC grads’ entry- level pay is $32K-to- $44K per year. They make a lot more because they get double-time after 9 hours of OT. My lowest paid tech made ~$69K, the average was ~$85K and the highest paid was ~$120K.” –Nat Lopez, AT&T Network Services
    21. 21. “In 2006, demand was off the charts. Every graduate had a job 6 months before graduation. Chemical Technology Graduates typically start at $35K and it is not uncommon for them to make $60K-to-$70K per year.” –Robert Hernandez, TSTC
    22. 22. Auto Collision $30K - $40K in the Valley $42K plus home, auto, health and life insurance plus a car
    23. 23. www.af.mil/news/airman/0104/launch1b.html “Production Engineers [from TSTC] start at $43K- $57K per year at United Launch Alliance.” – Edward Rodriguez, Sr. Manufacturing Engineering Manager, ULA
    24. 24. Technical Jobs White Collar Blue Collar Gold Collar
    25. 25. Med-to-High Skill and Professional Jobs General Academics Technical – Workforce Ed Next Gen
    26. 26. Nurses use to be able to depend on their ability to care for patients… now they have to be more technical and work computers, equipment, understanding best practices and managing inventory.” –Pam Craig, Chief Nursing Officer, Brownwood Regional Medical Center
    27. 27. Brownwood Regional Medical Center Workforce Projections Allied Health Occupation Salary* Currently Employed Openings Today New Jobs do to Attrition in 3 Years New Jobs due to Growth in 3 Years Registered Nurse $37,440 to $56,160 100 15 30 80* Occupational Therapist $62,400 to $78,000 2 2 0 2 Physical Therapist $62,400 to $78,000 6 to 8 2 2 0 Medical Lab Techs $29,120 to $45,760 ~12 ~3 ~3 0 Respiratory Therapists $31,200 to $52,000 10 1 1 0 LVN $22,880 to $37,440 100 ~3 - - *Salaries are normally much higher in reality given shift differentials, weekend differentials, over time, charge differentials, and clinical latters Example: An enrty RN making $37,440 will likely make closer to $45,760 given differentials and other factors. **Given adequate supply Source: Interview with John Sharp, CFO, Brownwood Regional Medical Center, Conducted on 3/22/2007
    28. 28. “US DOL states that health careers will grow faster than any other sector of the labor market at about 30%. Three out of every 10 new jobs in the next 20 years will be in health-related fields. In Texas, according to state labor projections, employment in health care facilities will increase 44-46% in Willacy, Hildago and Starr counties.” --Barbara Bennett, CDA, RDH, MS, TSTC Dental and Health Programs
    29. 29. “Turbine Techs earn $28-$40K a year… Many techs earning $40K - $80K a year with OT.” – Bryan Gregory, Jr. 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    30. 30. “In most industries you have electricians, mechanics and IT, in wind, you are expected to do everything.” -- Bryan Gregory, Jr. 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    31. 31. Lineman Oil Field Farm Mechanic Wind Turbine Tech Job Mergers – Wind Turbine 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    32. 32. Information Technology Mechatronics & IT Work Environment, Tools & Products
    33. 33. “Every system on a car is monitored or controlled by a computer. Technicians have to be more analytical and process oriented.” --Russell Carrigan, TSTC West, TX, Sweetwater,
    34. 34. “It used to be the sledgehammer mechanic. These days, the technology has advanced so much that our most important tool is our brain. It is more of a thinking man’s game now.” Jeff Nelson Service Manager CAT Skill Mergers
    35. 35. “Aviation Technicians qualify for two pay raises per year of $1.00 per hour topping out at $54K per year.” –Harvey Hall, American Eagle, Abilene
    36. 36. “We are looking for someone who can look at the mechanical, the electrical and the control and understand these systems. We need people who are capable of crossing over between these various areas.” --Don Sheffield Senior Recruiter GlobalSantaFe TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    37. 37. “We need people who have integrated skills related to mechanical, electronic, hydraulics and pneumatics.” Bill Biffinger, HR, Superior Essex TSTC West TX
    38. 38. “….we had to upgrade our basic mechanic skills to include programmable logic controllers and electrical systems.” --Dr. Ron Lentsch, Allergan 4/2007, TSTC Waco
    39. 39. Entry-Level R&D Tech $40,000-to-$50,000 4.16.2007, TSTC Waco
    40. 40. “Entry-level machinists make $36K-$37K. They top out at $60K but they can earn overtime and up to $7,500 per year for college reimbursement too.” –Chuck Marbut, Bell Helicopter
    41. 41. Specialized Knowledge & Skills Systems Knowledge & Skills Employment & ED Environment
    42. 42. GM Train
    43. 43. Unskilled Operators Highly Skilled Operators Employment Environment
    44. 44. Tolerances are getting tighter and tighter, we need people who can work with their heads and their hands.
    45. 45. “In this plant, in the next three years we will need nine Instrumentation and Numerical Control (INC) technicians.” Edward C. Trump Plant Manager Entergy 4/2007, TSTC Marshall
    46. 46. http://www.itsdocs.fhwa.dot.gov/JPODOCS/REPTS_TE/13599.htmltp://www.roadtraffic-technology.com/contractors/traffic_man/electrosonic/electrosonic1.html C4 Operations Centers Air Land Sea Space Cyber
    47. 47. Skill Mergers ?
    48. 48. Jobs Analysis • 1950’s Jobs vs Millennium Jobs • KSA Mergers (Ph.D. to Operator) • Job Mergers = Academic Mergers (K&S) • Systems Thinkers and Do’ers (multi-skill)
    49. 49. www.tstc.edu Forecast Emerging Technologies … of offering critical and emerging technologies, TSTC is leading a consortium of college and industry partners developing a statewide curriculum in fuel cell technology.
    50. 50. K-12 Informal Feeders
    51. 51. Technology Jobs E3
    52. 52. Wichita Metro Chamber of Commerce “Alignment is the issue… We need to start in 5th or 6th grade...” --Bryan “We need to build a [human capital] supply chain…” --Jim --Bryan Derreberry, President & CEO and Jim Schwarzenberger, VP Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    53. 53. “No one gets left behind but no one is going anywhere.” --Bruce Butler, STEM Chair, Maui Community College
    54. 54. “Not all kids learn the same way—we need to bridge the gaps.” –Rose Yamada, Elder
    55. 55. “If the end goal is innovation, creativity, problem solving, critical thinking… We can not continue to look at the world through a pin hole.” --Dr. Warren Hitz, Kamehameha Schools
    56. 56. How do we align K-12, CTC and employers?
    57. 57. K-12 CTC – Workforce & Technical Programs University Employers Industry, Government, Military and Civil Society Environmental System of Forces Globalization, Demography, Science & Technology
    58. 58. K-12 CTC – Workforce & Technical Programs University Employers Industry, Government, Military and Civil Society Environmental System of Forces Globalization, Demography, Science & Technology
    59. 59. Flip Side “Like many school systems, Maryland's Charles County Public Schools had different tracks for high school students who were going on to college and those pursuing vocational training. This outdated model ultimately reduced the status of voc ed to a lower level than academic programs. James Richmond, our district superintendent, championed the idea of a 21st- century school that would bring vocational and academic students together in one facility.”
    60. 60. What does it look like?
    61. 61. Contextual Theoretical Applied TEAMS
    62. 62. Waco Aerospace Industry K-12 Formal Feeders
    63. 63. High School
    64. 64. TSTC
    65. 65. Free Flight
    66. 66. High School
    67. 67. TSTC
    68. 68. Free Flight
    69. 69. L3 Scholarship Model Semester 1, 2, 3 Eligibility for part-time employment at L3 Semester 4, 5 Tuition paid for first three semesters Part-time employment at L3 Tuition paid directly by L3 Upon Graduation Two-year employment contract with L3
    70. 70. Students Education Industry Clear path to career Reduced student debt Real work experience Purposeful investment HIGHER SUCCESS RATES Fulfilling the mission Aligned curriculum with industry needs Grow programs in demand Anticipate new program needs INCREASED ENROLLMENT Leveraged investment Positive ROI Not subject to supply Engaged in production QUALITY WORKFORCE
    71. 71. Willard R. Daggett, Ed.D., President of the International Center for Leadership in Education Academics ARTSCTE America’s Top Performing Schools
    72. 72. Delia Weaver, Principal Former Director of CATE San Benito CISD
    73. 73. Sarah “It’s a stepping stone.” Nash “We rotate through the ER, pediatrics, surgery, ICU, new born, labor and delivery and oncology.” Sarah “I am going to the University of MHB, then into nursing and hopefully to medical school.” Nash “I am going to become an emergency medical technician next year at TSTC through dual enrollment and I want to go onto specialize and work in the emergency room.” Cindy Bengston, RN, BSN “CNA’s in the dual enrollment program with TSTC have a 100% pass rate. Most classes are 40%- to50%. It’s unheard of…”
    74. 74. “Understanding systems is the core. Today’s technicians have to play different roles. They have to know electronics, com- puters and mechanical systems and how they interact.” --Diego Villarreal
    75. 75. Computer Aided Drafting & Design
    76. 76. Non-LinearVideoEditing
    77. 77. TV Studio Production
    78. 78. Legal
    79. 79. Flip Side
    80. 80. Marty Thompson, Career & Technical Director and Dean of Advanced Technology Complex; Denton ISD
    81. 81. What do these programs have in common?
    82. 82. Educational environment which facilitates student pursuit of : • Licensures/Certifications • College Credits through Dual Credit • Academic Excellence and CTE Relevance • Knowledge/skills that will increase earning potential and better prepare students for post-secondary college and career goals
    83. 83. “We need to integrate and expand CTE systematically.” --Bruce Henderson, Superintendant, CAS, Maui
    84. 84. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 Kansas Board of Regents, TEA “We need to be able to be able to move beyond pilots in order to scale to the entire state.“ –Blake Flanders, Kansas Board of Regents, Kansas Post Secondary Technical Ed Authority
    85. 85. Bryron Martin ATC
    86. 86. Bryron Martin ATC
    87. 87. Lower Rio Grande Valley o College transition rates, all students: 56.7% o College transition rates, Tech Prep (2005 cohort): 65.7% State of Texas o College transition rates, all students: 55.3% o College transition rates (2005 cohort): Tech Prep: 55.6% Source: High School College Linkages, THECB Fall 2006 Preliminary Enrollment, (2005-2006 Data), in Patricia G. (Pat) Bubb 18% Increase in College Attendance
    88. 88. Focus on CTE medium-high skill and professional vocations CTE perception low skill or no skill -- Blue Collar CTE Position & Perception Shifting
    89. 89. Technology Jobs E3
    90. 90. The Future is Here: Emerging Technology, Jobs, Curricula, Students and Partnerships
    91. 91. Talk Story
    92. 92. October 4, 1957
    93. 93. What trends are placing pressure on education and educators to change?
    94. 94. v GlobalS&T Demography
    95. 95. “We are seeing brain drain fluctuate between 21% and 44%.” --Jeanne Unemori Skog and Leslie Wilkins, medb
    96. 96. www.kurzweilai.net/.../ SIN_headshot_highres.html “We're doubling the rate of progress every decade, we'll see a century of progress--at today's rate--in only 25 calendar years.” Kurzweil, KurzweilAI.net, March 7, 2001
    97. 97. Is the issue STEM?
    98. 98. http://www.3dnworld.com/users/1/images/UltimateEarth.jpg
    99. 99. “There is hidden poverty in Maui…” “The Indian reservation on the mainland is like home—I see poverty, alcohol abuse, drug abuse… the same problems.” “There are more native Hawaiians in jail per capita than any other population in the US.”
    100. 100. “There are kids on Maui who have never been to the top of the mountain or to Hana much less have they traveled off of the island.” http://www.flickr.com/photos/fotographis/528878003/sizes/o/ “There are kids on Maui who have never been to the top of the Halealaka or to Hana much less have they traveled off of the island.”
    101. 101. The key 21st Century issues: war, environmental degradation, globalization, population explosion, hunger, poverty and the…
    102. 102. The key 21st Century issues: …competitiveness of the military, companies, students and workers.
    103. 103. “I do not think Maui is any different than the mainland…post industrialization has placed greater demands on math and education.” –Rose Yamada, elder
    104. 104. “We need to prepare a high tech workforce or we will have to import workers from the outside.” --Mayor Charmain Tavares, Maui
    105. 105. Technology STEM Mergers Jobs Job Mergers Strategies E3 Mergers
    106. 106. www.kurzweilai.net/.../ SIN_headshot_highres.html “We're doubling the rate of progress every decade, we'll see a century of progress--at today's rate--in only 25 calendar years.” Kurzweil, KurzweilAI.net, March 7, 2001
    107. 107. Orlando Media Industry – DMAF – J. French
    108. 108. ROBOTS
    109. 109. Serious Games Games for Entertainment Transformation of Ed Tech
    110. 110. $7.5 million project that immerses students in the hectic environment of a hospital's intensive care unit and places them in a first-person role as a health- care professional. Funded by the U.S. Office of Naval Research, Pulse!! is being developed by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, which in turn hired Hunt Valley (Md.)- based BreakAway to produce and design the platform. –Business Week http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/apr2006/id20060410_051875.htm Pulse!!
    111. 111. USC ISI and Tactical Language Training (ITSEC 2005)
    112. 112. Simulation-Based Triage Training, Games for Health: Mass Casualty Care Panel , RTI International
    113. 113. Yang Cai, Ingo Snel, Betty Chenga, Suman Bharathi, Clementine Klein d, Judith Klein- Seetharaman; Carnegie Mellon University, University of Frankfurt, Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. www.andrew.cmu.edu/~ycai/biogam
    114. 114. Yang Cai, Ingo Snel, Betty Chenga, Suman Bharathi, Clementine Klein d, Judith Klein- Seetharaman; Carnegie Mellon University, University of Frankfurt, Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. www.andrew.cmu.edu/~ycai/biogame.pdf
    115. 115. ©numedeon,inc.2004 20,000 Interaction 1,000 Referral
    116. 116. NOSE
    117. 117. Vienna University of Technology Players operate track switches and adjusting the speed of virtual trains to prevent virtual trains from colliding. Researchers Daniel Wagner, Thomas Pintaric and
    118. 118. http://geeklit.blogspot.com/2007_03_01_archive.html Nokia Research Center, Helsinki Finland in MIT Technology Review
    119. 119. My daughter’s first computer at age —10 minutes.
    120. 120. 4th Gen Computing 3rd Gen Computing Birth of a new class of computing
    121. 121. http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/archive/users/warneke-brett/SmartDust/ Berkeley’s Golem Dust 11.7 mm3 total circumscribed volume ~4.8 mm3 total displaced volume Berkeley’s Deputy Dust 6.6 mm3 total circumscribed volume 4th Gen 11.7 mm3 6.6 mm3
    122. 122. “This is a plasma deposition machine…. We are working to put solar cells on virtually any surface—roof, car, etc.” –Scott Weeker, Director of Business Development
    123. 123. http://www.rsc.org/ej/LC/2006/b507312j/b507312j-f2.gif http://www.rsc.org/ejga/LC/2006/b507312j-ga.gif Lab-in-a-Pill 4th GEN
    124. 124. Wesley Medical Center, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    125. 125. http://www.rsc.org/ej/LC/2006/b507312j/b507312j-f2.gif http://www.rsc.org/ejga/LC/2006/b507312j-ga.gif Lab-in-a-Pill 4th GEN
    126. 126. ROBOTS http://www.camarasaur.us/alloria/gallery/view_image.one?photo_id=13532351 PLEO
    127. 127. ROBOTS http://www.camarasaur.us/alloria/gallery/view_image.one?photo_id=13532351 “A robotic life form with an evolving Personality.” --Ugobe PLEO by Tom Atwood, ROBOT Spring 2008
    128. 128. http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_598.html
    129. 129. If you have an automobile made in the past 10 years, your car has more computing power than rockets used to put man on the moon. TSTC West TX, Sweetwater, 10.31.2006
    130. 130. http://www.xpcarteam.com/ XP Vehicle Systems Features: Over 2500 mile range using our patented XPack Multi-Core(TM) power plant, energy is delivered to you when you need it, inflatable frame technology, extensive ability to customize and mitigate obsolescence (EVERYTHING is upgradeable), you assemble or dealer assemble, direct ships to you, some models can change bodies, some models fold after assemble for storage or parking.
    131. 131. Information Technology Mechatronics & IT Work Environment, Tools & Products
    132. 132. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7643818/ Running Shoe?
    133. 133. http://www.adidas.com/campaigns/adidas_1/content/downloads/adidas_ 1-wp_02_1280_1024.jpg http://www.adidasprlookbook.com/adidas1/index.asp • 1,000th of a second sensor measures gap between heel and a magnet • 20-MHz microcontroller measures changes in compression • Motor spins at 4000 rpm turns a screw loosens cable • Environmentally and operator adaptive shoe sole Wearable Robot
    134. 134. Computing Machines
    135. 135. ROBOTS
    136. 136. https://www.carle.com/Hospital/about/images/Ear%20Diagram3.jpg Cochlear Ear Implant
    137. 137. Robots Humans
    138. 138. CYBORGS
    139. 139. ROBOTS http://wiredvision.jp/news/images/slideshow/2007/09/gallery_nextfest2/d30.jpg Holy batcapes! The age of the superhero suit is upon us --Iain S Bruce, Technology Editor D30 Polymer Armor
    140. 140. Inflatable exoskeleton This prototype "power jacket" from Matsushita Electric Industrial is designed to help patients recover from partial paralysis. Sensors at the elbow and wrist allow a healthy arm to control the eight artificial muscles, which are powered by compressed air, on the paralyzed side.
    141. 141. An artificial red cell – the respirocyte [41]. Designer Robert A. Freitas Jr. ©1999 Forrest Bishop. http://www.imminst.org/freitas.html Nano- Mechatronics
    142. 142. Meta Analysis
    143. 143. STEM Mergers
    144. 144. Technology Jobs Strategies
    145. 145. The number of jobs requiring technical training is growing at five times the rate of other occupations. Innovate America, U.S. Council on Competitiveness
    146. 146. Our product line is inventions.” –Dan O’Connel, CEO
    147. 147. “Our goal is to reduce the cost of installed material 2/3rds and to double the performance of the best performing pv in the market today.” –Dan O’Conneell, CEO
    148. 148. “We are the first bio-diesel company in the US.” – Kelly Takaya King, Co-Founder
    149. 149. “Organic requires integration, more science, more diversity, more complexity, more information intensity.”--Ann Emmsley, Agriculture Program Coordinator
    150. 150. “Ahupua’a” Integrated, wholistic system
    151. 151. http://www.3dnworld.com/users/1/images/UltimateEarth.jpg
    152. 152. “65% of the people moving here between now and 2020 will be retirement age… Over the same period we will lose 80% of our nurses on Maui.” –Nancy Johnson, MCC, Nursing Chair
    153. 153. MCC Construction Academy, $30K to $80K per year
    154. 154. Information Technology Mechatronics & IT Work Environment, Tools & Products
    155. 155. Wind Turbine Tech 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    156. 156. “Turbine Techs earn $28-$40K a year… Many techs earning $40K - $80K a year with OT.” – Bryan Gregory, Jr. 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    157. 157. “In most industries you have electricians, mechanics and IT, in wind, you are expected to do everything.” -- Bryan Gregory, Jr. 11.1.2006, TSTC West TX, Sweetwater
    158. 158. Talk Story
    159. 159. “I am looking at the intersection of these technologies—where they overlap.” --Mark Hoffman, ECET Program Coordinator, MCC
    160. 160. “…integrated software, computers electronics, physics…” --Mark Hoffman, ECET Program Coordinator, MCC
    161. 161. Kansas Air National Guard, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    162. 162. Specialized Knowledge & Skills Systems Knowledge & Skills Employment & ED Environment
    163. 163. GM Train
    164. 164. Unskilled Operators Highly Skilled Operators Employment Environment
    165. 165. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 Spirit AeroSystems “1,000 workers a year needed for the aerospace cluster… 2,000 plus when we are on the up side.” --Jeff Turner, CEO
    166. 166. Frontier El Dorado Refining, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    167. 167. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    168. 168. Chief Master Sergeant David Wilson, Kansas Air National Guard Kansas Air National Guard, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    169. 169. http://www.itsdocs.fhwa.dot.gov/JPODOCS/REPTS_TE/13599.htmltp://www.roadtraffic-technology.com/contractors/traffic_man/electrosonic/electrosonic1.html C4 Operations Centers Air Land Sea Space Cyber
    170. 170. Skill Mergers ?
    171. 171. Meta Analysis
    172. 172. JobMergers
    173. 173. Technology Jobs Strategies
    174. 174. Butler – Wichita MSA
    175. 175. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 High School
    176. 176. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    177. 177. Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008 “BCC has 2+2 programs with Wichita State University, Kansas State, and Pittsburg State University.” –Buford Pringle, Integrated Manufacturing Technology
    178. 178. DJ Engineering, Butler Community College April 7 to 11, 2008
    179. 179. http://mbfaber.co.uk/images/3d_design.jpg
    180. 180. Orlando – Central Florida Corridor
    181. 181. Ocoee Demonstration Middle School
    182. 182. Orlando Tech – High School Program
    183. 183. Orlando FIEA University Program
    184. 184. Orlando Media Industry – DMAF – J. French
    185. 185. Lubbock – North Texas Regional Center for Innovation and Commercialization

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