Presented By:Jim WachtelNational Sales DirectorJim.wachtel@healthcheck360.com                                 1
Agenda  Introduction  Define Incentives  Types of Incentives and Strategies  HIPAA Compliance  Case Studies  Conclus...
Wellness Defined well·ness 1. the quality or state of being healthy in body and    mind, especially as the result of delib...
Incentive Defined in·cen·tive [in-sen-tiv]    noun 1. something that incites or tends to incite to action or    greater ef...
Traditional Wellness Has Failed  Price Waterhouse Coopers Study       71 % of employers offering wellness program…few sa...
The Old Solution…                      “Well… let’s raise  “Our health          deductibles and   care costs        increa...
Wellness and Incentive Reality  Many degrees of Wellness  Many degrees of Incentives  All should lead to a defined Popu...
Purpose of Incentives     1. Drive Participation     2. Spur Awareness and Motivation     3. Drives Positive Health Outcom...
Well Designed Incentive Program                               Incentives        Participation         Engagement         H...
Types of Incentives     1. Participation Based     2. Outcome Based            1. Progress Based Component     3. Combined...
Participation Based - Pros and Cons   Participation Based     Everybody wins     Little impact   Outcome Based       ...
Participation Based Wellness - Examples  Participation Based     Self reported HRA      questionnaire     Walking/Pedom...
Participation Based Incentives- Examples    Gift Cards    Merchandise    Time Off    Premium Differential
Outcome Based Wellness
Outcome Based Wellness - Examples  Outcome Based – Must measure health   objectively    Score model      0-100 based on...
Scored Model                               Easy to understand                                scoring drives              ...
Easy to Understand Reporting Proprietary & Confidential    18
Tiered Contribution Wellness Structure            Gold Level            • Repeat participants with 85 or greater          ...
Individual Biometric Model       Wellness Test          NIH Goal    Employer’s Goal   Points   BMI                        ...
Outcome Based Wellness - Examples  Incentive Types    Premium differential      Lower premium for participating or meet...
Outcome Based Model Pays for Itself   Cost Neutral Implementation   • Year 1: Increase contribution rates by $40 company w...
Incentive Value and Participation                        100%                                                           • ...
HIPAA Compliance  Wellness Program conditions and rewards MUST comply with  HIPAA Wellness Program Regulations:         1....
Significant Shift towards Outcome Based Incentives       Use a default plan option for employees NOT ful lling requirement...
Motivating Behavior Change     1. Extrinsic Motivators            1. Comes from “Outside”            2. Based on “External...
What Influenced You To Improve Your Health?      Receiving Biometric data                                                9...
Attitudes towards ProgramProgram made it more likely for me to                                                92%         ...
You Don’t Know What You Don’t Know                      Claims Information         Biometric Screening Findings       • 50...
Employee Perception of Health                                            Self reported Status of Health88% of participants...
Case Study – Partial Union Environment                                          Plan Costs/Premiums per Covered           ...
Comprehensive Programming Flattened Costs                         Plan Cost/Premiums Per Covered Employee15,000           ...
Repeat Participation Equals Better Health                         Typical Profile of New v. Repeat Participant            ...
5 Part Intervention Model                  % of                              20% of Members        70% of Members         ...
Using Choice Architecture to Drive Behavior Change1.       Defaults: Obstacles to the Path of Least Resistance     –      ...
Participation Required to Maintain Plan Options                          Restructuring the cost of doing nothing  • Employ...
Multiple Plans and Premiums Based on Outcomes                                                                        All E...
Physical Activity Program – Combined IncentiveEmployees can enroll in one of three physical activity program options in fi...
Tight Integration With Health Coaching and Medical Management                                        HRA                  ...
Repeat Participation = Reduced Claims Expense                           Risk Marker Triggers                              ...
2011-12 Results – Changing Behavior and Results                                                  12%Level 1 – Participatio...
Repeat Participation = Reduced Claims Expense                                              $5,493.29           3 HRA w/ bi...
Medical Trend Claims Analysis                                                                     2007: Client’s trends  ...
Correlation to Health Score in Population                                                  Score Correlation              ...
Biometrics and Medical Expense          Glucose Level Correlation to Avg.                                                 ...
Impact of Nicotine Use on Claims                              Nicotine Use Correlation to Avg. Claims                     ...
Impact of Health on WC Costs                                                     Total                                 Tot...
Doing Nothing is a Losing Strategy                Migration study of 43,312 Individuals Over 3 Years            Year 0    ...
Excess Risk Equals Excess Cost    Cost Area                        Low Risk             Medium         High Risk          ...
Best Practices                                                        Engage                                              ...
Key Components of Outcome Based Wellness   1. Objective, comprehensive biometrics to detect risk   2. Clear-cut scoring an...
Presented By:Jim WachtelNational Sales DirectorJim.wachtel@healthcheck360.com(563) 289-7360
HC360 incentive strategies to improve health and reduce cost 051712
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HC360 incentive strategies to improve health and reduce cost 051712

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HealthCheck360 Incentive Strategies to Improve Health and Reduce Health Care Costs. Presented to Mississippi Association of Self Insured, May 2012.

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  • Traditional wellness has failed. Past attempts target healthy individuals who would be engaging in healthy behaviors regardlessWellness is a tricky word: many visualize wellness as the rah-rah here’s a pedometer you’re on your own approachHC360 has on average an 80% participation rate because of the incentive model
  • Various studies show that 85% of people are wired to not change unless there are consequencesMyth: People won’t changeReality: Seat belt use 30 years ago compared to today Drunk driving 30 years ago compared to today Worksite/Job safety 30 years ago compared to today
  • Popularity and acceptanceof aggressive incentive models is rapidly increasing
  • Implemented:HRA, Biometric screenings, outcome based incentives, and comprehensive health coaching in 2008
  • Far too much emphasis on smoking alone and instead use a HC360 approach for holistic healthIn the long run smoking can have devastating impactBig spending after retirementThis is just claims costs, think about all the lost productivity (thinking of next cigarette, more breaks)
  • Looking from start to year three, people trend the wrong direction
  • HC360 incentive strategies to improve health and reduce cost 051712

    1. 1. Presented By:Jim WachtelNational Sales DirectorJim.wachtel@healthcheck360.com 1
    2. 2. Agenda  Introduction  Define Incentives  Types of Incentives and Strategies  HIPAA Compliance  Case Studies  Conclusion Proprietary & Confidential 2
    3. 3. Wellness Defined well·ness 1. the quality or state of being healthy in body and mind, especially as the result of deliberate effort. 2. an approach to healthcare that emphasizes preventing illness and prolonging life, as opposed to emphasizing treating diseases.
    4. 4. Incentive Defined in·cen·tive [in-sen-tiv] noun 1. something that incites or tends to incite to action or greater effort, as a reward offered for increased productivity. adjective 2. inciting, as to action; stimulating; provocative.
    5. 5. Traditional Wellness Has Failed  Price Waterhouse Coopers Study  71 % of employers offering wellness program…few said they are effective at lowering costs  Participation remains low  <40% average participation rate in wellness  <15% of those eligible participate in disease mgmt  Opt-in health coaching participation in the single digits
    6. 6. The Old Solution… “Well… let’s raise “Our health deductibles and care costs increase employee are up 10% contributions again.” again!”
    7. 7. Wellness and Incentive Reality  Many degrees of Wellness  Many degrees of Incentives  All should lead to a defined Population Health Management Strategy that Drives Positive Outcomes
    8. 8. Purpose of Incentives 1. Drive Participation 2. Spur Awareness and Motivation 3. Drives Positive Health Outcomes (Positive Behavior Change) 4. Improve Productivity and Morale 5. Ultimately, reduce and control costs Proprietary & Confidential 9
    9. 9. Well Designed Incentive Program Incentives Participation Engagement Health Outcomes Target: As necessary to Rewards go to those 80% to 100% build momentum, who have less risks OR participation support change are making progress in reducing risks Proprietary & Confidential 10
    10. 10. Types of Incentives 1. Participation Based 2. Outcome Based 1. Progress Based Component 3. Combined 1. Case Study Proprietary & Confidential 11
    11. 11. Participation Based - Pros and Cons  Participation Based  Everybody wins  Little impact  Outcome Based  Measured Results  Earn the result  Accountable  High Impact
    12. 12. Participation Based Wellness - Examples  Participation Based  Self reported HRA questionnaire  Walking/Pedometer programs  Points for activities (online videos, lunch and learns, weight loss challenge, etc.)
    13. 13. Participation Based Incentives- Examples  Gift Cards  Merchandise  Time Off  Premium Differential
    14. 14. Outcome Based Wellness
    15. 15. Outcome Based Wellness - Examples  Outcome Based – Must measure health objectively  Score model  0-100 based on biometric results  Individual Biometric model  Tiered structure based on specific biometric indicators
    16. 16. Scored Model  Easy to understand scoring drives engagement and participation  Scored model translates risks into compliant measurement model  Long term measurement tool Proprietary & Confidential 17
    17. 17. Easy to Understand Reporting Proprietary & Confidential 18
    18. 18. Tiered Contribution Wellness Structure Gold Level • Repeat participants with 85 or greater • Repeat participants with <71 AND 10+ pt improvement Silver Level • Repeat participants with >=71 and <85 • Repeat participants with <71 AND 5+ pt improvement • ALL new participants Bronze Level • Participation only incentive
    19. 19. Individual Biometric Model Wellness Test NIH Goal Employer’s Goal Points BMI <= 24.9 <= 29.9 1 Blood Pressure <= 120/80 <= 130/85 1 LDL Cholesterol <= 100 <= 130 1 Blood Glucose <= 100 <= 110 1 Nicotine Negative Negative 1 Spouse Nicotine Negative Negative 1  Goals can be adjusted  Points can have a dollar value  More data points for participant to remember Proprietary & Confidential 20
    20. 20. Outcome Based Wellness - Examples  Incentive Types  Premium differential  Lower premium for participating or meeting standard  HSA Contribution  Contribution for participating or meeting standard  Plan design  Earn enrollment in preferred plan options  Whatever the Incentive, Program Cost Should be Neutral with Proper Design
    21. 21. Outcome Based Model Pays for Itself Cost Neutral Implementation • Year 1: Increase contribution rates by $40 company wide for singles and $80 for a family, then offer $40/$80 discount for participating or meeting the health outcome • Year 2: Upon retesting, offer discount for: – maintaining high level of health – improving health (5 points) – Compliance with physician’s care Proprietary & Confidential 22
    22. 22. Incentive Value and Participation 100% • Results for completion of Health Risk Assessments 80%Enrollment Percentage show a direct correlation 60% between incentive value 40% and participation 20% • Incentives reward those 0% who make healthy $0 $100 $200 $400 $600 $800 $1000 Incentive (Annual Cash Value) lifestyle choices Proprietary & Confidential 23
    23. 23. HIPAA Compliance Wellness Program conditions and rewards MUST comply with HIPAA Wellness Program Regulations: 1. Limit on Reward 2. Reasonably Designed To Promote Good Health or Prevent Disease 3. Annual Opportunity to Qualify For Reward 4. Reasonable Alternative Standard 5. Disclosure Required Proprietary & Confidential 24
    24. 24. Significant Shift towards Outcome Based Incentives Use a default plan option for employees NOT ful lling requirements in 5% 9% health/disease management activities Incent only members who complete multiple health engagement activities 29% 24% Incent only members who complete requirements of health engagement 37% 23% activities Incent participation in health engagement activities 53% 23% Reward/penalize based on health status factors other than 6% 19% smoker, tobacco-use status Reward/penalize based on smoker, tobacco-use status 24% 18% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%2010 Employer Survey on Purchasing Value 2010 2011*in Health Care Report, Towers Watson &National Business Group on HealthNote: *Planned for 2011
    25. 25. Motivating Behavior Change 1. Extrinsic Motivators 1. Comes from “Outside” 2. Based on “External Factors” 3. Money, Tangible rewards 2. Intrinsic Motivators 1. Comes from “Within” 2. Intangible, Enjoyable, Meaningful Proprietary & Confidential 26
    26. 26. What Influenced You To Improve Your Health? Receiving Biometric data 91% Biometrics and Want to pay lower insurance premiums 73% premium incentives Taking online HRA 63% are much more influential than Spouse was improving health 56% online HRA or Illness of friend/family 48% personal events in influencing decision Co-worker inspired change 21% to improve health. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Somewhat agree, Agree and Strongly Agree N = 6,000 Proprietary & Confidential 27
    27. 27. Attitudes towards ProgramProgram made it more likely for me to 92% improve health There was very strong agreement Provided valuable insight into my 92% health that the program not only provided good Report helped me understand where 89% to change insight into health, but also help Premium Incentive motivated me to 80% foster the desire to improve my health improve health. Articles I received motivated me to 67% One-third of improve health participants found Alerted me to medical condition I 34% out about a health wasnt aware of* issue that they were 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% unaware of before Somewhat Agree, Agree and Strongly Agree the program.* Using Agree/Disagree scale only N = 6,000 Proprietary & Confidential 28
    28. 28. You Don’t Know What You Don’t Know Claims Information Biometric Screening Findings • 50 have claims with a diagnosis • 111 with glucose in diabetic range suggesting diabetes or pre- • 580 with glucose in pre-diabetic diabetes range • 78 have claims with a diagnosis • 549 individuals with elevated suggesting hypertension systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings • 98 individuals have claims with a • 815with elevated cholesterol diagnosis suggesting being at risk • 883 with BMI readings > 30, of of a heart attack which 396 (44.8%) are also pre- diabetic N = 1,750 Mfg Firm Proprietary & Confidential 29
    29. 29. Employee Perception of Health Self reported Status of Health88% of participants self-reported a 10% 1% 0% good or great health status 29% Great Good Average70% of participants scored a 71 or Below Average higher (ideal or low level of Poor risk) 59% Biometric Results 4% 8%1% of participants self reported a 33% Ideal (85+) below average or poor health 18% Low (71-84) status Moderate (61-70) High (51-60)12% of participants scored a 60 or Very High (<=50) below (high or very high risk) 37% Proprietary & Confidential 30
    30. 30. Case Study – Partial Union Environment Plan Costs/Premiums per Covered Plan Year Employee 2007-2008 $8,852 2008-2009 $9,054 2009-2010 $8,365 2010-2011 $8,967 2011-2012 $8,823 • Medical and drug costs have actually decreased on a per employee and per member basis over the last five years. • If medical plan costs had increased at rate of 8% per year since 2007-08, ABC Company premiums would be $7.24 million dollars higher than today. Total Wellness investment less than $1m in same period. Proprietary & Confidential 31
    31. 31. Comprehensive Programming Flattened Costs Plan Cost/Premiums Per Covered Employee15,000 13,00613,000 12,043 11,15111,000 10,325 8,852 9,560 8,852 9,054 8,967 8,823 9,000 8,365 8,247 7,000 5,000 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Actual 2007-08 Trended Plan Cost Savings Actual $1.0 $3.5 $3.8 $5.7 $8.4 vs. Trended (millions) $22.4 Million of Plan Cost Savings Over 5 Years Proprietary & Confidential 32
    32. 32. Repeat Participation Equals Better Health Typical Profile of New v. Repeat Participant Avg. Avg. Avg. Avg. Avg. Total Avg. Nicotine Biometric Profile 2011 Score BMI Weight Systolic Diastolic Cholesterol Glucose POS Repeat Participants 76.6 29.0 192.8 120.4 76.3 192.6 97.8 26%First Time Participants 67.9 29.9 203.2 124.4 78.3 195.7 101.7 22%  Of the 612 repeat participants between 2010 and 2011, the overall average health score increased from 72.6 to 76.6. There was an improvement in health score in almost every risk category (with the exception of those scoring over 96).  Overall blood pressure for these same participants decreased, as did the overall cholesterol levels.  Of the 40 people who were at extremely high risk for blood pressure in 2010, 30 moved to be at moderate, low, or ideal categories.  Of the 173 people with high or very high cholesterol risk, nearly 45% moved to moderate, low, or ideal categories.  The number of people with very high glucose levels fell 35%. Proprietary & Confidential 33
    33. 33. 5 Part Intervention Model % of 20% of Members 70% of Members 10% of Members members % of costs 5% of costs 45% of costs 50% of costs Chronic/ STAGE Healthy At-Risk Catastrophic 1. Healthcheck360 Biometric Screening & HRA 2. Review of Findings Call 3. Physical Activity Program 5. Condition 4. Health Coaching Management Proprietary & Confidential 34
    34. 34. Using Choice Architecture to Drive Behavior Change1. Defaults: Obstacles to the Path of Least Resistance – Defaults are powerful and unavoidable. Within a choice structure, there must be an associated rule to determine what happens to the decision maker if he/she does nothing. – In this case, the decision maker that does nothing, forfeits freedom of medical plan choice. – Forcing Function: To get what you WANT, you must do something else first. (ATM)2. Potential Gain (Incentives) versus Fear of Loss (Disincentives) – Greater Influence?3. Give Feedback: The best way to help humans improve performance. – Important to provide feedback before things go wrong. (Laptop low battery)4. Structure Complex Choices – Structuring choice sometimes means helping people to learn so they can later make better choices on their own. Proprietary & Confidential 35
    35. 35. Participation Required to Maintain Plan Options Restructuring the cost of doing nothing • Employee must participate in Health Risk Assessment (HRA) program to be able to choose from all medical plan options • Condition Management candidates must be compliant with “best-practice” treatment and compliant with medications to be eligible to choose from all medical plan options – Adults over the age of 21 and primary on the medical plan – CM Compliance does not apply to dependents under the age of 21 • If employee does not meet participation requirements for HRA or CM Compliance then they are only eligible to enroll in Plan 4 - High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) with no Health Reimbursement Account (HRA) from the company – (Sin Bin) • Incentives (lower premiums/credits) tied to engagement and achieving health outcomes Proprietary & Confidential 36
    36. 36. Multiple Plans and Premiums Based on Outcomes All Employees Level 1 – Participation in Participate in HC360 Don’t Participate in HC360 & ROF Calls Screening HC360 Screening Score 71+ or improve Score <70 and don’t Level 2 – Overall health 5 points improve 5 points management, improvement Have a Have a No chronic No chronic chronic chronic Condition Condition Condition Condition Non- Non- Compliant Compliant Level 3 – Care compliant compliant with Care with Care compliance with Care with CareAll Plans Plan 4 – Sin Bin All Plans All Plans All Plans Plan 4 – Sin Bin Plan 4 – Sin BinLowest Premiums Highest Premiums Lowest Premiums Middle Premiums Middle Premiums Highest Premiums Highest Premiums Proprietary & Confidential 37
    37. 37. Physical Activity Program – Combined IncentiveEmployees can enroll in one of three physical activity program options in first half of year. Employee contribution incentive of $150 paid after program completion. Physical Activity Credit Earned Evaluation Incentive Payout April 1 – September 30 October Nov 1 – Mar 31 • Walking Challenge • Exchange info • $150 Incentive • Fitness Challenge • $30 per month • Health Coaching Calls Proprietary & Confidential 38
    38. 38. Tight Integration With Health Coaching and Medical Management HRA participants Condition Already in Biometrics qualify Condition Disease for Disease Management Management Management Management Team Team Not eligible for Disease Management Health Coaching Team
    39. 39. Repeat Participation = Reduced Claims Expense Risk Marker Triggers Every HRA participant • BMI > 30.00 classified by number of risks BMI • BMI < 18.50 they have • Total > 200 mg/dl • Extreme: 5+ RisksCholesterol • HDL < 50 mg/dl • High: 3-4 Risks • LDL > 130 mg/dl • Moderate: 2 risks • Trig > 175 mg/ dl • Low: 0-1 risks Blood • Systolic > 130 Pressure • Diastolic > 85 Number of Outbound Health Coaching calls driven • Glucose > 100 by number of risks Glucose • 5 risks = 5 calls • Nicotine = POS • 4 risks = 4 calls Nicotine • 3 risks = 3 calls • 2 risks = 2 calls • GGT > 65 • 1 risk = 1 call GGT • Unlimited call-in coaching calls Proprietary & Confidential 40
    40. 40. 2011-12 Results – Changing Behavior and Results 12%Level 1 – Participation in YesHC360 & ROF Calls 88% No Biometric 2010 2011 Avg. Avg. Avg. Avg. Avg. Total Avg. Profile Score Score BMI Weight Systolic Diastolic Cholesterol GlucoseLevel 2 – Overall health Repeatmanagement, improvement 72.6 76.6 29.0 192.8 120.4 76.3 192.6 97.8 Participants First Time 67.9 29.9 203.2 124.4 78.3 195.7 101.7 Participants 100% 85% 87% 76% 50% 40%Level 3 – Care compliance 0% Asthma Hypertension Diabetes Natl Average Proprietary & Confidential 41
    41. 41. Repeat Participation = Reduced Claims Expense $5,493.29 3 HRA w/ biometrics $5,838.68 2 HRA w/ biometrics $6,202.27 1 HRA w/ biometrics $8,132.47 Non-participant/ HRA Only $5,000.00 $5,500.00 $6,000.00 $6,500.00 $7,000.00 $7,500.00 $8,000.00 $8,500.00Large Financial Services Firm Proprietary & Confidential 42
    42. 42. Medical Trend Claims Analysis  2007: Client’s trends $11,500.00 increase exponentially $11,000.00 $10,500.00 Wellness implemented in  2008: Wellness 2008. Implemented $10,000.00 $9,500.00  2010 actual claims demonstrated: $9,000.00 $8,500.00 – Trend reduced to low single digits for two straight years $8,000.00 – $959,051 saving from $7,500.00 expected trend $7,000.00 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 – $1,470,386 savings from industry average trend Cost per employee on plan Average for Industry Expected Claims Proprietary & Confidential 43
    43. 43. Correlation to Health Score in Population Score Correlation $12,000.00 Average claims per HRA participant: $10,000.00 $8,000.00  Year 1 – $7,057.57 $6,000.00  Year 2 – $6,023.68 $4,000.00 $2,000.00 $- 85+ 71-84 61-70 51-60 50 or less Linear (2009) Linear (2010) N = 1589 Proprietary & Confidential 44
    44. 44. Biometrics and Medical Expense Glucose Level Correlation to Avg. BMI Level Correlation to Avg. Claims (medical claims only) Claims (medical claims only)$4,500 $7,000 $4,253 $6,000$4,000 Incurred Medical Claims $5,000$3,500 $4,000 $2,973$3,000 $3,000 $2,000$2,500 $2,316 $1,000$2,000 $0 Ideal < 100 Moderate 100-125 High 126+ < 18 18-25 25-29 30-34 35-39 40+ Avg. Claims Linear (Avg. Claims) BMIActual Results from HC360° Client Pool Proprietary & Confidential 45
    45. 45. Impact of Nicotine Use on Claims Nicotine Use Correlation to Avg. Claims (medical claims only) $8,000 $7,000 $6,000 $5,000 $4,000 $3,000 $2,000 $1,000 $0 18-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60+ NEG POS N = 18,000 Proprietary & Confidential 46
    46. 46. Impact of Health on WC Costs Total Total Score Counts Avg WC <50 150 $875.76 50-59 206 $1,007.89 60-75 561 $771.36 76-85 342 $703.24 86+ 330 $366.25 Total 1,589 $713.09N = 1,589 Proprietary & Confidential 47
    47. 47. Doing Nothing is a Losing Strategy Migration study of 43,312 Individuals Over 3 Years Year 0 Year 3 Key Findings Low Risk (0-2 Low Risk (0-2  Risk profile of a population Health Risks) Health Risks) gets worse over time 27,951 26,591  Number of high risk individuals increased 11.4% Medium Risk (3- Medium Risk (3- 4 Health Risks) 4 Health Risks)  Number of medium risk 10,670 11,495 individuals increased 7.7%  Number of low risk individuals decreased 4.9% High Risk (5+  Results are a function of High Risk (5+ Health Risks) Health Risks) American lifestyle habits 4,691 5,226 and the realities of age Source: University of Michigan Health Management Research Center Proprietary & Confidential 48
    48. 48. Excess Risk Equals Excess Cost Cost Area Low Risk Medium High Risk (N=671) Risk (N=396) (N=504) Short-Term $160 $288 $444 High Risk Disability Employees Worker’s $304 $325 $662 cost three Compensation times as Absence $327 $455 $703 much as low risk Medical & $1,544 $1,983 $4,929 employees! Pharmacy Total $2,335 $3,052 $6,738 Source: University of Michigan Health Management Research Center Inflation adjusted to 2009: http://www.halfhill.com/inflation.html Proprietary & Confidential 49
    49. 49. Best Practices Engage • Meaningful Incentives • Effective Communication Measure Identify • Measure and Evaluate Results • Biometric Screening - Full Blood Panel • Executive/ Aggregate Reports • Health Risk Assessment Support Educate • Coaching for all Participants • Individual Reporting • Program Integration • Monthly Newsletter • MyHealthCheck360.com • Targeted Communications Proprietary & Confidential 50
    50. 50. Key Components of Outcome Based Wellness 1. Objective, comprehensive biometrics to detect risk 2. Clear-cut scoring and measurement model 3. Portable and Carrier Independent 4. Meaningful Incentives (Substantial, Understandable) 5. Full spectrum support for positive behavior change (Health Coaching, Engagement Tools, Educational Resources) 6. Measured Results and Analysis Proprietary & Confidential 51
    51. 51. Presented By:Jim WachtelNational Sales DirectorJim.wachtel@healthcheck360.com(563) 289-7360

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