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Safety Inspections By J Mc Cann

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Health and Safety Work place inspections

Health and Safety Work place inspections

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  • 1. SAFETY INSPECTIONS By James McCann
  • 2. INTRODUCTION
    • The Health and Safety Commission and its operating arm, the Executive (HSC/E), have spent the last twenty years modernizing the structure of health and safety law. Their aims are to protect the health, safety and welfare of employees, and to safeguard others, principally the public, who may be exposed to risks from industrial activity.
    • Whether you are carrying out an inspection as a safety technician, manager or supervisor in a large office complex, factory or a small work shop, there are many duties and responsibilities that are common to all places of work.
  • 3.
      • The provision and maintenance of plant and systems of work that are safe and without risks to health
      • Arrangements for ensuring the safety and absence of health risks in connection with the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances
      • Provide such information, instruction, training and supervision as is necessary to ensure the health and safety at workplaces under the employer's control
      • Ensure that work places, plant and processes are safe and without risk to health
      • Provide and maintain safe means of access and egress (entry, exit and escape) from premises and work areas.
      • Provide and maintain a working environment for employees that is safe, without risks to health and adequate as regards facilities and arrangements for their welfare at work. This includes transport, store , handle and use materials in a safe manner.
    GENERAL DUTIES
  • 4.
      • Produce and distribute a statement of safety policy and its implementation to all employees.
      • Consult with employees' representatives on matters related to health and safety and establish safety committees if sought by representatives. Such consultation is guided by published codes of practice.
      • Ensure that those who are not employed are informed of safety and hazards for when they work or are present on employer premises and use equipment and materials.
  • 5.
    • The regulations apply to most work activities. They up-date and extend existing UK health and safety law (1974 Act) and impact on employer duties in relation to employees and others affected by work activity. They also affect the self- employed obligation to protect themselves and others. They cover European Union (EU) Article 118A directives on health and safety at work in relation to:
    Regulations
  • 6.
    • Control over Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)
    • Health and Safety Management ( Left click here for hyper link Health and Safety Management.ppt )
    • Work Equipment Safety (click here for hyper link PUWER.ppt )
    • Manual Handling of Loads ( Left click here for hyper link MANUAL HANDLING POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOW.ppt )
    • Workplace Conditions
    • Personnel Protective Equipment ( Left Click here for hyper link THE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT AT WORK.ppt )
    • Display Screen Equipment
    • Construction (Design and Management)
    • Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994 (1) The pre-tender stage health and safety plan and (2) the role of the planning supervisor
    • Signpost to the Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996 (Left click here to go to hyper link SAFETY SIGNS.doc )
  • 7. Risk Assessment
    • Employers must assess the risks to the health and safety of employees and anyone else affected by the work activity.
    • necessary preventive and protective measures must be identified.
    • employers with five or more staff must record the findings of risk audits and how plans and controls are implemented.
  • 8.
    • An employer need not duplicate assessment work. Assessments done e.g. for compliance with COSHH are likely to contribute to servicing the management regulations.
    • Employers must devise and implement arrangements for putting measures (plans, organizational arrangements, control systems, monitoring and review methods etc) that follow from risk assessment, into practice.
  • 9.
    • This includes
      • emergency procedures
      • co-operating with other employers sharing a work site
      • providing employees with clear, understandable information about H&S matters, ensure they have adequate H&S training and are capable enough at their jobs to avoid risks
      • temporary workers must be provided with particular H&S information to meet special needs.
    • If a risk audit identifies health needs, then employers must provide appropriate health surveillance for employees, e.g. Shift workers
    • When developing and applying measures needed for compliance, employers must appoint competent people (internal or external)
  • 10.
    • Inspections of the work place should be
    • carried out on a regular basis, The
    • inspection should be carried out
    • Systematically and methodically and be an
    • opportunity to;
    • educate,
    • inform and
    • to change attitudes
    • as well as checking that you have done
    • enough to comply with the your duties under
    • relevant Statutory provisions.
  • 11.
    • EXTERNAL, car parking, loading areas.
    • INTERNAL, house keeping, welfare.
    • WORK AREAS, cleanliness, ergonomics,
    • MACHINERY, cleaning, maintenance (electrical and mechanical).
    • OFFICES cleanliness, ergonomics of work stations
    • PROCEEDURES, risk assessments, supervision, training and information.
    Inspections can be split up into areas of responsibility or different functional areas i.e.
  • 12.
    • There will not only be differences in the approach to meeting the duties placed on different organisations but also financial considerations.
    • A safe and healthy working environment promotes motivation and productivity
    • An unsafe, dirty, poorly equipped or maintained working environment tends to be a miserable place to work.
    • The following slide show is for illustrative purposes and gives examples typical or characteristic of a small to medium sized factory/workshop.
  • 13. EXTERNAL
    • SAFE ACCESS AND EGRESS
    • ADEQUATE SAFETY ARRANGEMENTS/CONTROL MEASURES FOR VEHICULAR TRAFFIC
    • This may involve looking at the area at different times i.e.
    • Clocking on/off
    • Times of year
    • Weather conditions
    • Parking bays and loading areas clearly marked, traffic signs that
    • comply with Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals)
    • Regulations 1996 (SI 1996 No 3-11) i.e.
    • SPEED RESTRICTIONS
    • ONE WAY ARROWS
    • NO PARKING
  • 14. ADEQUATE ARRANGEMENTS/CONTROL MEASURES FOR PEDESTRIANS ACCESS AND EGRESS
    • Remember vehicles and pedestrians don’t mix.
    • Think about any visitors they may not be familiar with the lay out of, or what goes on at your place of work again clear signs are vital.
    • If hard hats are to be worn, proper and adequate warning signs, are there arrangements in place before a visitor enters a danger area.
  • 15. IF MANNED CONTROLS: PPE HIGH VISIBILITY JACKETS/SAFETY FOOTWEAR
    • THE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT AT WORK REGULATIONS 1992
    • Also think about PPE & welfare arrangements for other staff working outside, i.e. loading areas.
    • Different weather conditions and times of year.
  • 16. SAFETY SIGNS
  • 17. SUFFICIENT OUTSIDE LIGHTING
    • PARTICULARLY IF THERE IS WORK CARRIED ON OUTSIDE
    • AGAIN CHECK AT DIFFERENT TIMES/ WEATHER CONDITIONS.
    • CHECK IF GLARE IS A PROBLEM
  • 18. FIRE ESCAPE ROUTES & ASSEMBLY POINTS
    • Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996 (SI 1996 No 3-11)
    • CLEARLY MARKED
    • FREE FROM OBSTRUCTIONS
    • EXTERNAL FIRE ESCAPES PROPERLY MAINTAINED WITH GOOD LIGHTING
  • 19. A locked FIRE EXIT = A BIG FINE if you are lucky !!!!
  • 20. GENERAL STATE OF REPAIR OF ROADS AND PATHWAYS
    • THESE ARE SUBJECT TO WEAR AND TEAR i.e. CHECK FOR POT HOLES AND UNEVEN SURFACES
    • ADEQUATE LIGHTING
  • 21. EXTERNAL DILAPIDATIONS OF BUILDINGS
    • STRUCTURE
    • LOOSE DRAIN PIPES
    • LOOSE SLATES
    • WINDOWS CLEAN AND IN GOOD REPAIR
    • TEMPORARY STRUCTURES
    • HASAW etc ACT 1974 S2.2 D
  • 22. ENVIRONMENTAL DUST, FUMES, NOISE, SMELLS & WASTE
    • Control of Industrial Air Pollution (Registration of Works) Regulations 1989 (SI 1989 No 318)
    • Air Quality Regulations 1997 (SI 1997 No 3043)
    • (Harmonisation of Noise Emission Standards) (Amendment) Regulations 1995 (SI 199.5 No 23.57)
    • Control of Asbestos at Work (Amendment) Regulations 1992 (SI 1992 No 3068)
    • Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 1987 (SI 1987 No 211s)Control of Asbestos in the Air Regulations 1990 (SI 1990 No 556)
    • Control of Lead at Work Regulations 1980
    • LOCAL AUTHORITIES……………….
  • 23. BUILDINGS.
  • 24. SAFE ACCESS & EGRESS HASAW etc ACT 1974 S 2.2 D
  • 25. SAFETY SIGNS Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations 1996 (SI 1996 No 3-11)
    • ARE FIRE ESCAPES AND ESCAPE ROUTES CLEARLY MARKED
    • LIGHTING
    • NOT BLOCKED
    • NOT LOCKED
    • EASY TO OPERATE
  • 26. The Fire Precautions Act 1971
    • The Act furthers the provisions for the protection of persons from fire risks. If any premises are put to use and are designated a certificate is required from the fire authority.
  • 27. BLOCKED FIRE EQUIPMENT
  • 28. FIRE PRECAUTIONS
    • Abstract of Special Regulations (Highly Flammable Liquids and Liquefied Petroleum Gases) Order 1974 (SI 1974 No 1587)
    • FIRE APPLIANCES AND ARRANGEMENTS FOR MAINTENANCE/CHECKS (click here Fire & Extinguishers.ppt )
    • FIRE DRILLS / TRAINING (PARTICULARLY FOR NEW STAFF)
    • FIRE DETECTION AND ALARMS, MAINTENANCE
  • 29. FIRE RISK
  • 30. TRAINED FIRST AIDERS & EMERGENCY PROCEEDURES
    • Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 (SI 1981 No 917)
    • ACCIDENT RECORDING INCLUDING NEAR MISSES (F2508 ACCIDENT REPORT FORM, B 15 10 ACCIDENT REPORT BOOK)
    • PROCEEDURES FOR REPORTING ACCIDENTS, RIDDOR
    • FIRST AIDERS; QUALIFIED, IN DATE WHO, AND WHERE.
  • 31. FIRST AID KITS
    • CHECK CONTENTS ALSO ENSURE THATTHERE ARE NO PROHIBITED ITEMS i.e. DRUGS, EVEN OVER THE COUNTER ONES.
  • 32. HEATING LIGHTING VENTILATION
    • Minimum working temp 15 C or 65 F after half an hour for those who are considered sedentary workers
    • Filters cleaned
    • temperatures controlled
    • Adequate lighting
    • Diffusers cleaned
    • Not draughty
  • 33. AIR MOVEMENT
    • A DRAUGHTY WORKING ENVIRONMENT CAN BE VERY UNCOMFORTABLE TO WORK IN
    • Check doors and windows are fitting properly also that doors are not wedged open
  • 34. ADEQUATE WITH REGARDS TO WELFARE PROVISSIONS; HSE. INDG293   5/99 Click here for more on welfare provisions
  • 35. Welfare (Left click here to go to hyper link)
    • Enough toilets and washbasins for those expected to use them - people should not have to queue for long periods to go to the toilet;
    • Where possible, separate facilities for men and women - failing that, rooms with lockable doors;
    • Clean facilities - to help achieve this walls and floors should preferably be tiled (or covered in suitable waterproof material) to make them easier to clean;
    • A supply of toilet paper and, for female employees, a means of disposing of sanitary dressings;
    • Facilities that are well lit and ventilated;
    • Facilities with hot and cold running water;
    • Enough soap or other washing agents;
    • A basin large enough to wash hands and forearms if necessary;
    • A means for drying hands, e.g. paper towels or a hot air dryer;
    • Showers where necessary, i.e. for particularly dirty work.
  • 36. The following tables show the minimum number of toilets and washbasins that should be provided . Table 1: Number of toilets and washbasins for mixed use (or women only) Number of people at work Number of toilets Number of washbasins 1-5 1 1 6-25 2 2 26-50 3 3 51-75 4 4 76-100 5 5
  • 37. Table 2: Toilets used by men only Number of men at work Number of toilets Number of urinals 1-15 1 1 16-30 2 1 31-45 2 2 46-60 3 2 61-75 3 3 76-90 4 3 91-100 4 4
  • 38. REST ROOMS - FOOD PREPERATION AREAS
    • FIRE HAZARDS & PRECAUTIONS
    • HYGIENE
    • CLEANLINESS
  • 39. INTERNAL DILAPIDATIONS
    • REGULAR MAINTENANCE SCHEDULES
    • LOOSE FITTINGS
    • FLAKING PAINT WORK
    • BUILD UP OF DIRT/ GREASE RUBBISH etc.
  • 40. EMPLOYEES COMPETENT PERSONS
    • Health and Safety (Young Persons) Regulations 1997 (SI 1997 No 135)
    • TRAINING AND SUPERVISION
  • 41. WORK AREAS MACHINERY & PROCESSES
  • 42.
    • SAFE ACCESS & EGRESS
    • GANGWAYS CLEARLY MARKED
    • POTENTIAL SLIP TRIP BUMP HAZARDS POTENTIAL FALL FROM HEIGHT HAZARDS
    • FENCED OR RESTRICTED AREAS CLEARLY MARKED MAINTAINED
    • WORK AREA ERGONOMICS;
    • SEATING,
    • FLOORING,
    • LIGHTING
    • VENTILATION
  • 43. SAFETY SIGNS
  • 44. MACHINERY
    • FENCING,GUARDS & EMERGANCY STOPS.
    • LIFTS HOISTS FORKLIFTS DATES TESTED AND CERTIFIED. Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998
    • POWER PRESSES GUARDS AND SAFETY FENCING,
    • OPERATOR TRAINING
    • RISK ASSESSMENTS
    • MACHINERY & TOOLS SUITABLE FOR PURPOSE, MAINTENANCE (PUWER) (CLICK HERE TO GO TO HYPER LINK HAND ARM VIBRATION SYNDROME}
    • EXHAUST VENTILATION. Environmental pollution
  • 45.
    • Horizontal Milling Machines Regulations 1928/1934 (SR&O 1928 No 548, SR&0 1934 No 207)
    • Operations at Unfenced Machinery Regulations 1938,1946 (SR&Os 1938 No 641; 1946 No 156)
    • Power Presses Regulations 1965 as amended (SI 1965 No 1441, SI 1972 No 1512)
    • Prescribed Dangerous Machines Order 1964 (SI 1964 No 971)
    DANGEROUS MACHINERY
  • 46. MECHANICAL HAZARDS
    • CUTTING HAZARDS
    • PUNCTURE HAZARDS
    • CRUSHING & PINCHING HAZARDS
    • SPINNING / IN – RUNNING HAZARDS
    • EJECTION HAZARDS
  • 47. GRINDING OPERATIONS
    • Protection of Eyes Regulations 1974 (SI 1974 No 1681)
    • Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1992 (SI 1992 No 2932) 1998 (SI 1998 No 2306)
    • PPE REGS
  • 48. CHEMICALS: COSHH REGULATIONS
    • USE , STORAGE HANDLING & TRANSPORTATION
    • RISK ASSESSMENTS
    • RECORDS
    • PPE
    • CONTAINERS
    • EMERGENCY and FIRST AID PROCEEDURES
  • 49.
    • CONTACT WITH IRRITATING SUBSTANCES PROTECTION OF EYES, HANDS etc. PPE
    • CHEMICAL / BIOLOGICAL CONTACT DERMATITIS ; PPE
    • BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF EMPLOYEES
  • 50. NOISE LEVELS ( left click here for hyper link)
    • DURATION & TIME EXPOSED (LAeq) dBA
    • CHECK AT DIFFERENT TIMES
  • 51. VIBRATION
    • FREQUENCY & AMPLITUDE ( m/s )
    • THINK ABOUT DAMPING
    • DURATION
    2
  • 52. ATMOSPHERE ANYLISING
    • FUMES & DUST VENTILATION & EXTRACTION
    • CONFINED SPACES any room, compartment, tunnels, etc that do not have fixed / permanent or natural ventilation
  • 53. WASTE DISPOSAL
    • The Environmental Protection Act 1990
    • To prevent the pollution from emissions to air, land or water from scheduled processes the concept of integrated pollution control has been introduced.
    • Authorisation to operate the relevant processes must be obtained from the enforcing authority which, for the more heavily polluting industries, is HM Inspectorate of Pollution.
    • Control of pollution to air from the less heavily polluting processes is through the local authority.
  • 54.
    • Regulations also place a 'duty of care' on all those involved in the management of waste, be it collecting, disposing or treating Controlled Waste which is subject to licensing.
  • 55.
    • In addition to extending the Clean Air Acts by including new measures to control nuisances, the Regulations introduce litter control;
    • amend the Radioactive Substances Act 1960;
    • regulate genetically modified organisms;
    • regulate the import and export of waste;
    • regulate the supply, storage and use of polluting substances and allow the setting up of contaminated land registers by the local authority.
    • In 1991 the Water Act 1989 that controlled the pollution and supply of water was replaced by five separate Acts.
  • 56. MANUAL HANDLING OPERATIONS ( left click here to go to hyper link manual handling)
    • CHECK RISK ASSESSMENTS
    • PPE
    • Musculoskeletal disorders are by far the most common form of work-related ill-health problem in Great Britain. They can prove costly for the individual, the business and health service providers.
  • 57. OFFICES
    • VISUAL DISPLAY SCREENS audit display screen equipment work-stations and reduce risks that are discovered
      • ensure that workstations satisfy minimum requirements for the display screen itself, the keyboard, desk and chair, lighting and ventilation in the working environment, the design of the task etc
      • plan work involving display screen equipment to accommodate breaks and variation in activity
      • provide information and training for target users.
      • ACCESS EGRESS
  • 58. SAFETY POLICIES & PROCEEDURES
    • INFORMATION AND TRAINING FOR EMPLOYEES; Health and Safety Information for Employees Regulations 1989 (SI 1989 No 682)
    • Employers have 2 principal duties under the Regulations:
    • either to display the poster OR to distribute the leaflet (HSIER Reg.4);
    • To provide further information giving details of the enforcing authority for the premises and the local address for EMAS (HSIER Reg.5).
    • POLICY STATEMENTS
    • EMERGENCY PROCEDURES (Click here for more on reporting injuries diseases dangerous occurrences)
    • Employer liability insurance
  • 59. PRODUCTS SECTION 36 and Schedule 3 of Consumer Protection Act 1987 - articles for use at work) places specific duties on the designers, manufacturers, importers and suppliers
    • Such people must: ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that articles they design, constructed, make, import, supply etc are safe and without risks to health at all times e.g. when it is being set up , cleaned, used or maintained by someone at work
    • Carry out (or arrange for) such testing and examination necessary to perform the duties above
    • Take steps to ensure that those supplying someone with "the article/substance" have adequate information about its designed and tested use. This includes essential conditions for dismantling and disposal
    • Act to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that people so supplied are given updated information where it becomes known that the article/substance gives rise to serious risk to health/safety.
  • 60. The end