Risk Assessment
By
Jim McCann
The following slide show is for guidance only, it will
 demonstrate the principles of assessing Risks within
 the work pla...
RISK
ASSESSMENTS



 What is a risk
 assessment?
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 .
Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992
Personal Protective...
A risk assessment is nothing more than a careful examination
of what, in your work, could cause harm to people, so that
yo...
Hazard means
anything that can
   cause harm



Risk is the chance,
 high or low, that
somebody will be
  harmed by the
  ...
EXAMPLE
Working from ladders, obviously the risks increase
with the height, however there may be other
contributory factor...
What do I
need to do
  as an
employer?
As an employer you are legally obliged
under the Management of Health and
Safety at Work Regulations 1999 to carry
out a r...
How detailed will
your assessment be?
This will depend on the type of operations and tasks
performed. The assessor should look at the overall
operations or task...
FIVE STEPS TO
     RISK
 ASSESSMENT
STEP 1
Identify the
  Hazard
Look only for hazards which you could reasonably
expect to result in harm under all the conditions in your
workplace. Use ...
Slipping/tripping would not be considered as a hazard unless
as it is a consequence of e.g.
Uneven poorly maintained roads...
STEP 2
    Who might be
     harmed?

Staff

Operators

Members of the public

Contractors
There is no need to list individuals by
name – just think about groups of people
doing similar work or who might be
affect...
STEP 3
Is more needed to control the risk?
For the hazards listed, do the precautions already taken:

· Meet the standards set by a legal requirement?

· Comply with...
Common sense is probably the most important factor,
talk to the people who do the job they are often in the best
position ...
Have you provided


· Adequate information, instruction , training and supervision,
 Plant , machines and environment that...
CHECK

Do your employees know where to look or who to
ask for advice and instructions. Have they been
adequately trained.
...
STEP 4
Record your findings
Remember only significant findings need to be
recorded, however you still have to let people
know what is being done and w...
•STEP A


                   Vehicular traffic entering / exiting
                   Mechanical / Electrically operated Ga...
The findings should be recorded and the staff
concerned informed and instructed as to their
outcome and of the safe method...
•STEP B




•List groups of people who are
at risk from the hazards you have
identified
•STEP C



•List existing controls or note where the
information may be found.
•List risks which are not adequately
contro...
STEP 5 Review and revision


On review check that the precautions for
each hazard still adequately control the
risk. If no...
EXAMPLE
STEP 1
HAZARDS
  MOVING VEHICLES
  ELECTRICAL / MECHANICALLY
   OPERATED GATES AND BARRIERS
  MANUALLY OPERATED GATES
 ...
HAZARDS & CONTRIBUTORY
FACTORS
 ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
 ENVIRONMENT; EXPOSURE TO CLIMATIC
  VARIATIONS,
 BIOLOGICAL ( Mid...
 Driver fatigue, influence of alcohol / drugs, vehicle
  condition and excessive speed.
 Road surface wear and tear.
 I...
STEP 2
Who is at risk from the significant hazards


  Staff on Access control duties
  Staff
  Contractors
  Visitors...
STEP 3
Assessing the risk from the
identified Hazards and
contributory factors
HAZARD CONTROL MEASURES
            ADEQUATE TO CONTROL THE HAZARD OR TO REDUCE OR
                          ELIMINATE RIS...
• One way system in operation during in musters,
           • extra manning,
           • Reduced opening, traffic wands, ...
•Speed restrictions approaching check points
                             •Traffic control wands
                         ...
• Systems of work that allow adequate breaks
            and reduce exposure times
          • Provision of rest & toilet ...
•Defect reporting
              • CSO required to keep post tidy
              • Electrical equipment tested
             ...
• Emergency reporting procedures as set down in
                   standing orders
                 • Defect reporting
   ...
• High visibility Jackets and Vests
          • Boots to provide toe and ankle protection ,
            Thermal and water ...
• The Slope, is reported as contributing to
                                back pain by staff. Also increases stopping
  ...
REVISE

For the hazards         · Meet the            · Comply with a
 listed, do the      standards set by a          rec...
IF THE ANSWER IS NO TO ANY OF THE PREVIOUS
THEN GO BACK TO STEP 3. REVISE AND RECORD
WHAT MEASURES NEED TO BE TAKEN TO
CON...
Moving Vehicle Hazard
Pedestrian Access / Egress
 Due to the FASLANE 360 Protests the pavement
  outside the North Gate i...
PPE and Uniform
 Issues are being looked into by the Clothing
  Committee and will be revised
ERGONOMICS
 Speed restrictions and warning signs maybe required,
  staff awareness / training
 Rotations in place to lim...
AFTER AN ACCIDENT OR NEAR MISS


           IF ANYTHING
             CHANGES


       SET A DATE / TIME FOR
             A...
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B Part 4 Risk Assessment & Study Example By J Mc Cann

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B Part 4 Risk Assessment & Study Example By J Mc Cann

  1. 1. Risk Assessment By Jim McCann
  2. 2. The following slide show is for guidance only, it will demonstrate the principles of assessing Risks within the work place as set out in the Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) The Five Steps to Risk Assessment, issued by the Health and Safety Executive, and complies with the requirements set out in the Management of Health and Safety Regulations 1999 In the example situation, there may well be more and/or different hazards to consider. The points raised here are not meant to be comprehensive and have been chosen for the purpose of illustration.
  3. 3. RISK ASSESSMENTS What is a risk assessment?
  4. 4. Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 . Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992 (PPE); Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment Regulations 1992 Noise at Work Regulations 1989 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1999 (COSHH); Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 1987 Control of Lead at Work Regulations 1998 ‘The risk assessment provisions in all these regulations say that your assessment of risks must be either 'adequate' or 'suitable and sufficient'. These mean the same thing and tell you that you do not have to be overcomplicated. In deciding the amount of effort you put into assessing risks, you have to judge whether the hazards are significant and whether you have them covered by satisfactory precautions so that the risks are small’ Five steps to risk assessment INDG163(rev) 1998
  5. 5. A risk assessment is nothing more than a careful examination of what, in your work, could cause harm to people, so that you can weigh up whether you have taken enough precautions or should do more to prevent harm. The aim is to make sure that no one gets hurt or becomes ill. Accidents and ill health can ruin lives, and affect your business too. You are legally required to assess the risks in your workplace. The important things you need to decide are whether a hazard is significant, taking into account any contributory factors and whether you have it covered by satisfactory precautions so that the risk is small.
  6. 6. Hazard means anything that can cause harm Risk is the chance, high or low, that somebody will be harmed by the hazard.
  7. 7. EXAMPLE Working from ladders, obviously the risks increase with the height, however there may be other contributory factors that will increase the risks e.g. weather conditions wind and or rain, where the work is being carried out, the structure onto which the ladder is placed, the surface on which the ladders are being used will increase or decrease the risks of working on ladders. Contributory factors may change rapidly and without warning.
  8. 8. What do I need to do as an employer?
  9. 9. As an employer you are legally obliged under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 to carry out a risk assessment of the significant risks in your workplace. Where there are five or more employees a record should be kept.
  10. 10. How detailed will your assessment be?
  11. 11. This will depend on the type of operations and tasks performed. The assessor should look at the overall operations or tasks that employees are required to perform. This may involve assessing the operation or task at different times of day and or under different environmental conditions. Significant findings of the assessment should be recorded and a record kept. It may be helpful to use a checklist to aid this process.
  12. 12. FIVE STEPS TO RISK ASSESSMENT
  13. 13. STEP 1 Identify the Hazard
  14. 14. Look only for hazards which you could reasonably expect to result in harm under all the conditions in your workplace. Use the following examples as a guide: • Manual Handling Operations (e.g. Gates ) • Vehicular traffic movement • Electrical Equipment • Chemicals, corrosive or toxic substances • Hot or extremely cold articles or substances • Radiological processes • Biological processes, products or Natural • Stress at work (e.g. System of work , lack of welfare facilities) • Environment (e.g. Noise, Exhaust Fumes, Climatic conditions )
  15. 15. Slipping/tripping would not be considered as a hazard unless as it is a consequence of e.g. Uneven poorly maintained roads , pathways , surfaces or where slippery substances or conditions are found. In other words unless there is something that would contribute too, cause or increase the risk of slipping or tripping . Remember only significant findings (hazards or risks) need be recorded
  16. 16. STEP 2 Who might be harmed? Staff Operators Members of the public Contractors
  17. 17. There is no need to list individuals by name – just think about groups of people doing similar work or who might be affected by the work being done e.g. Consideration must also be given to Pregnant women and Young persons for certain activities. A persons capacities, abilities and or disabilities must also be taken into account when assessing risks.
  18. 18. STEP 3 Is more needed to control the risk?
  19. 19. For the hazards listed, do the precautions already taken: · Meet the standards set by a legal requirement? · Comply with a recognized industry standard? · Represent good practice? · Reduce risk as far as reasonably practicable?
  20. 20. Common sense is probably the most important factor, talk to the people who do the job they are often in the best position to know. You may also have to refer to the appropriate legislation , Regulations or Codes of Practice. To check whether the duties are ‘in so far as reasonably practicable ‘ or ‘absolute duties’ E.g. Guards and Emergency stops on certain machines , prime movers and Presses are absolute duties. Examples of Statutory Acts / Instruments;- •The Health and Safety at Work etc Act •The Factories Act •Management of Health and Safety at work Regulations •COSHH Regulations •Manual handling Regulations •Provision and use of work place equipment Regulations •The Working Time Regulations
  21. 21. Have you provided · Adequate information, instruction , training and supervision, Plant , machines and environment that are safe ? · Adequate systems of work or procedures? (e.g. Emergency procedures, Defect reporting, maintenance and inspections) Provision for the safe handling and storage of articles or substances that may cause harm ?. If so, then the risks are adequately controlled, but you need to indicate the precautions you have in place. Where the risk is not adequately controlled, indicate what more you need to do.
  22. 22. CHECK Do your employees know where to look or who to ask for advice and instructions. Have they been adequately trained. If the answer is no then go back a Step
  23. 23. STEP 4 Record your findings
  24. 24. Remember only significant findings need to be recorded, however you still have to let people know what is being done and what they have to do.
  25. 25. •STEP A Vehicular traffic entering / exiting Mechanical / Electrically operated Gates Manually operated Gates List significant hazards here:
  26. 26. The findings should be recorded and the staff concerned informed and instructed as to their outcome and of the safe method of work. If you decide there are no risks to health, or the risk is minimal this does not need to be recorded.
  27. 27. •STEP B •List groups of people who are at risk from the hazards you have identified
  28. 28. •STEP C •List existing controls or note where the information may be found. •List risks which are not adequately controlled and the action needed:
  29. 29. STEP 5 Review and revision On review check that the precautions for each hazard still adequately control the risk. If not indicate the action needed. Note the outcome. Making changes in your workplace may introduce new hazards. Look for them and follow the five steps.
  30. 30. EXAMPLE
  31. 31. STEP 1 HAZARDS  MOVING VEHICLES  ELECTRICAL / MECHANICALLY OPERATED GATES AND BARRIERS  MANUALLY OPERATED GATES  PEDESTRIANS (even people can be a hazard)
  32. 32. HAZARDS & CONTRIBUTORY FACTORS  ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT  ENVIRONMENT; EXPOSURE TO CLIMATIC VARIATIONS,  BIOLOGICAL ( Midges)  NOISE EXPOSURE TO FUMES / EXHAUST  VIOLENCE / ABUSE
  33. 33.  Driver fatigue, influence of alcohol / drugs, vehicle condition and excessive speed.  Road surface wear and tear.  Ice , fuel / oil spills reducing road surface friction co- efficiency  Glare indices (Direct, Indirect and reflective) see Handout on lighting.  Shift working, Tiredness and Stress  Slips & Trips
  34. 34. STEP 2 Who is at risk from the significant hazards  Staff on Access control duties  Staff  Contractors  Visitors  General public
  35. 35. STEP 3 Assessing the risk from the identified Hazards and contributory factors
  36. 36. HAZARD CONTROL MEASURES ADEQUATE TO CONTROL THE HAZARD OR TO REDUCE OR ELIMINATE RISKS Y/N • Extra manning at times of high volume • Traffic control wands • CSO directing traffic and pedestrians • PPE HIGH VISIBILITY JACKETS AND VESTS , MOVING VEHICLES • Training and supervision • Separation of vehicles & pedestrians via pedestrian gates • Emergency stop buffer strip on gate • Maintenance and defect reporting systems • Emergency stop on gate and barrier controls ELECTRICAL / • Flashing lights and claxon when gate moves MECHANICALLY OPPERATED GATES • Training and supervision • Manual Handling Training and supervision • Maintenance and defect reporting systems • i.a.w. Manual Handling Regulations MANUALLY OPERATED GATES
  37. 37. • One way system in operation during in musters, • extra manning, • Reduced opening, traffic wands, CSO controlling traffic movement, • Training and instruction Traffic management • I.a.w. Standing orders and Post Instructions • Emergency stop, controlled / separation from a distance • Defect reporting • Instruction and training Electrically operated barrier • Maintenance i.a.w. The Factories Act, Electrical Regulations • To reduce speed of vehicles entering /exiting the car park • Speed restrictions • i.a.w Standing orders Traffic calming
  38. 38. •Speed restrictions approaching check points •Traffic control wands •Warning signs •Defect reporting systems •Training and instruction •Traffic cones •All signage In accordance with Signs and Signs and signals / road signals Regulations markings
  39. 39. • Systems of work that allow adequate breaks and reduce exposure times • Provision of rest & toilet facilities • Drying room and dryer • Management training recognising Stress • Supervision • Alcohol / drug policies Welfare • Violence / harassment policies • WELFARE at Work REGULATIONS
  40. 40. •Defect reporting • CSO required to keep post tidy • Electrical equipment tested • Electrical Regulations, PUWER •Roads and paths swept, sanded/ gritted as required Good house keeping • Systems of work to reduce exposure times • Issue of foul weather clothing •Heaters • Insect repellent and Gas operated insect trap • Defect reporting • Sun block •Dip Headlights warning notices • Maintenance and defect reporting • Lighting ENVIRONMENT
  41. 41. • Emergency reporting procedures as set down in standing orders • Defect reporting • Training and supervision • Airwaves radio training • Telephone EMERGENCY • Report of Injuries Dangerous Occurrence Regulations, Accident reporting & Major Accident PROCEEDURES & Hazard Regulations COMMUNICATIONS • Training and supervision
  42. 42. • High visibility Jackets and Vests • Boots to provide toe and ankle protection , Thermal and water resistant qualities PPE • Uniform foul weather clothing • PPE Regulations, Standing Orders & Uniform
  43. 43. • The Slope, is reported as contributing to back pain by staff. Also increases stopping distance for traffic entering the gates • The shelter is draughty , cramped, with no installed heating and poor lighting, seating is unsuitable. ERGONOMICS Contributory factors in the • No access to toilet facilities, exacerbated during nightshift when there is no one layout of the New North Gate available to act as a relief
  44. 44. REVISE For the hazards · Meet the · Comply with a listed, do the standards set by a recognized precautions legal requirement? industry standard? already taken: y/n y/n · Reduce risk in so · Represent good far as is reasonably practice? y/n practicable? y/n ARE THE INSTRUCTIONS AND TRAINING ADEQUATE y/n
  45. 45. IF THE ANSWER IS NO TO ANY OF THE PREVIOUS THEN GO BACK TO STEP 3. REVISE AND RECORD WHAT MEASURES NEED TO BE TAKEN TO CONTROL THE RISKS IF THE ANSWERS ARE YES THEN YOU ARE CONTROLING THE RISKS
  46. 46. Moving Vehicle Hazard Pedestrian Access / Egress  Due to the FASLANE 360 Protests the pavement outside the North Gate is fenced off requiring Pedestrians who wish to gain access to enter via the Main Gate.  This presents an increased hazard to pedestrians  A higher level of vigilance and control of Vehicles is required by Gate Staff on Traffic Control Duties in order to allow safe access to pedestrians.
  47. 47. PPE and Uniform  Issues are being looked into by the Clothing Committee and will be revised
  48. 48. ERGONOMICS  Speed restrictions and warning signs maybe required, staff awareness / training  Rotations in place to limit exposure times.  Portable heaters supplied
  49. 49. AFTER AN ACCIDENT OR NEAR MISS IF ANYTHING CHANGES SET A DATE / TIME FOR A REVIEW INVOLVE THE TRADE UNIONS SAFETY REPS AND EMPLOYEES DO NOT JUST FILE AND FORGET

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