Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

DIKULT103 Digital Genres: Intro lecture

1,105

Published on

I don't usually do powerpoints for teaching, but somehow I started doing one for the first lecture in DIKULT103, and so I ended up piling it down with examples to talk about. This may not be very …

I don't usually do powerpoints for teaching, but somehow I started doing one for the first lecture in DIKULT103, and so I ended up piling it down with examples to talk about. This may not be very useful without reading the first 60 or so pages of Manovich's Language of New Media.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,105
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • MIT Museum: Kismet the AI robot smiles at youGretings, @robotants readers!Pictures of Kismet: Nikon #1, Nikon #2, iPhone #1, iPhone #2.The caption under the Fox Trot cartoon reads:[quote]Kismet (1993-2000)Here you can get a first-hand look at one of the world's most famous robots. There are 7 DC motors, 14 servo motors, 4 cameras and 2 microphones as well as jacks for audio, video, computers and power. Can you find them? These are things that connected Kismet to its computers and software and helped it interact with human beings in a natural way.MIT Museum CollectionsTransferred from MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory"[/quote]Quoting Wikipedia's Kismet article:[quote]Kismet is a robot made in the late 1990s at Massachusetts Institute of Technology with auditory, visual and expressive systems intended to participate in human social interaction and to demonstrate simulated human emotion and appearance. The name Kismet comes from the Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Hindi and Punjabi word meaning "fate" or sometimes "luck".[1]Design and constructionIn order for Kismet to properly interact with human beings, it contains input devices that give it auditory, visual, and proprioception abilities. Kismet simulates emotion through various facial expressions, vocalizations, and movement. Facial expressions are created through movements of the ears, eyebrows, eyelids, lips, jaw, and head. The cost of physical materials is an estimated US$25,000.[1]Four color CCD cameras mounted on a stereo active vision head and two wide field of view cameras allow Kismet to decide what to pay attention to and to estimate distances. A .5 inch CCD foveal camera with an 8 mm focal length lens is used for higher resolution post-attentional processing, such as eye detection.By wearing a small microphone, a user can influence Kismet's behaviour. An auditory signal is carried into a 500 MHz PC running Linux, using software developed at MIT by the Spoken Language Systems Group that can process real-time, low-level speech patterns. A 450 MHz PC running NT processes these features in real-time to recognize the spoken affective intent of the caregiver.In addition to the computers mentioned above, there are four Motorola 68332s, nine 400 MHz PCs, and another 500 MHz PC.[1]Maxon DC servo motors with high resolution optical encoders are positioned to give Kismet three degrees of eye movement, which allow it to control gaze direction and gives Kismet the ability to move and orient its eyes like a human. This allows Kismet to simulate human visual behaviors. It also allows humans to assign a communicative value to eye movements and to allow Kismet to focus on what it deems important in its field of vision.Kismet shows a strong resemblance to Gizmo, a creature from the 1984 movie Gremlins.In the mediaKismet has been featured on NBC as well as Discover magazine and is the project of Cynthia Breazeal. It also played a small role in the Steve Reich opera Three Tales, as a symbol of the development of artificial intelligence, and also a voice of traditional ethics.[/quote]
  • Transcript

    • 1. DIKULT103: DIGITAL GENRES
      General theories and introduction
      Jan 20, 2011
      Jill Walker Rettberg, Førsteamanuensisi digital kultur
    • 2.
    • 3. Readings:
      Egenfeldt-Nielson, Simon, Jonas Heide Smith and Susana Pajares Tosca. Understanding Video Games: The Essential Introduction. Routledge, 2008. 294 pages.
      Tribe, Mark andReena Jana. New Media Art. Taschen, 2007/2009.
      Wardrip-Fruin, Noah, and Nick Montfort. The New Media Reader. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003. (You will only need a few texts from this anthology, so if you don’t need it in other DIKULT courses you may manage by borrowing a copy.)
      A collection of articles (kompendium) to be bought at Studia (315 kr).
    • 4. Also: a reading list of electronic literature, games, and digital art that you will be expected to be familiar with. These will be presented at the start of each section.
    • 5. Pre-digital.
      Len Lye: Swinging the Lambeth Walk. Video animation, 1937.
      http://video.google.com/
      videoplay?docid=4059841348493635424#
    • 6. Digital.
      Chris Milk: The Johnny Cash Project. (2010)
      http://www.thejohnnycashproject.com
    • 7. Is there an essential difference between digital art and non-digital art?
    • 8. Manovich, 2001.
    • 9. Media and computing have developed in parallel for 200 years, almost converging again and again.
      Manovich, Lev (2001) The Language of New Media. MIT Press.
      Image:http://www.bijt.org/wordpress/2005/11/
    • 10. The Jacquard Loom (1801)
    • 11.
    • 12. Daguerrotypes as new media infatuation
    • 13. Difference Engine (Babbage 1823)
    • 14. Analytical Engine (1837)
      The first general purpose computer.
    • 15. (what if they had succeeded in building computers back then?)
    • 16. Fabrikkene fortsatte
    • 17. The Universal Turing Machine
      (Alan Turing)
    • 18. “Zuse strip” – KonradZuse used discarded 35mm movie film to make the first punched tape computer programs.
      (Image from http://www.casualoptimist.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/zuse-film.jpg)
    • 19.
    • 20. There are five key differences between old and new media.
      Manovich, Lev (2001) The Language of New Media. MIT Press.
      Image:http://www.bijt.org/wordpress/2005/11/
    • 21. 1. Numerical Representation
    • 22. Media is programmable.
    • 23.
    • 24. This generates that.
      Ted Warnell: “Poem Binary”
      http://codepo.blogspot.com/2008/12/poem-binary.html
    • 25. 2. Modularity
    • 26. “elements are assembled into larger objects but maintain their separate identities”
    • 27.
    • 28.
    • 29.
    • 30.
    • 31. 3. Automation
    • 32. Numerically encoded modules pulled together on the fly (low-level automation)
    • 33. High-level automation
      Kismet, the MIT robot that responds to your tone of voice (late 1990s)
    • 34. Easy access to data, search, re-use, remix
      “War President” by Joe of American Leftist
    • 35. 4. Variability
    • 36. content / interface
    • 37. Customise the work for each individual
      Reason magazine’s customised covers, 2004.
      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1908113
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/lenejohansen/3276126816
    • 38. Customisation using Facebook Connect is popular these days
      http://cnnbc.moveon.org/?rc=fbauto.txt5.pic3
    • 39. Or using Google’s immense databases
      http://www.thewildernessdowntown.com/
    • 40. Manovich talks about“branching interactivity”andhypermedia
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ba1BqJ4S2M
    • 41. Pressreturn or Y
      sometimes pressing returnworks
      Certainwords in thetext ”yield” and takeyou to a newpagewhenyouclickthem–but in thispiece, links aren’t marked
      Youcanalsonavigateusingthecontrol strip.
    • 42. yes
    • 43. Or ifyoupressedno:
    • 44. Sold as a book
      afternoon, a story
      av Michael Joyce
      ISBN 1-884511-01-5
      Macintosh eller Windows
      US$ 25.00
    • 45. Ted Nelson:
      ”Well, by ”hypertext” I meannon-sequentialwriting – textthatbranches and allowschoices to thereader, best read at an interactive screen.”
    • 46. Tor Åge Bringsværd
      ”Faen. Nå har de senket takhøyden igjen. Må huske å kjøpe nye knebeskyttere.”
      Med Jon Bing, Sesam ’71
      WebutgaveavnettkunstnerenMariusWatz:
      http://www.evolutionzone.com/faen)
    • 47. (you’ll hear more about hypertext)
    • 48. Is variability a useful term for thinking about a game?
    • 49. Variability seems to fit this well?
    • 50. (is this an example of variability?)
      50 People See Their Own Shadow, by Neil Kandalgaonkar (“Brevity”), 2005. Flickr.com.
    • 51. Salavon: Every Playboy Centerfold: The Decades
    • 52.
    • 53. Material principles (axioms)1. Numeric coding2. Modular organizationMore far-reaching (but dependent on the first two):3. Automation4. VariabilityThe most substantial consquence of the computerization of media:5. Transcoding.
    • 54. 5. Transcoding
    • 55. There is a “conceptual transfer” from the computer world to culture at large. (page 47)
      Manovich, Lev (2001) The Language of New Media. MIT Press.
      Image:http://www.bijt.org/wordpress/2005/11/
    • 56. Programmable media
    • 57. From media studies, we move to something that can be called software theory.
      Manovich, Lev (2001) The Language of New Media. MIT Press.
      Image:http://www.bijt.org/wordpress/2005/11/

    ×