#Connect #Engage #Measure: Leveraging Social Media in Your Career
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#Connect #Engage #Measure: Leveraging Social Media in Your Career

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A presentation intended for an audience of undergraduate PR and media students interested in using social media for professional development.

A presentation intended for an audience of undergraduate PR and media students interested in using social media for professional development.

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#Connect #Engage #Measure: Leveraging Social Media in Your Career #Connect #Engage #Measure: Leveraging Social Media in Your Career Presentation Transcript

  •     #Connect  #Engage  #Measure:   Leveraging  Social  Media  in  Your   Career   Jill  Hopke   @jillhopke     February  20,  2014  
  • #Connect  #Engage  #Measure  Outline   •  •  •  •  •  •  •    Social  Media  in  the  Changing  Media  Landscape   TwiGer  Best  PracJces   LinkedIn  Best  PracJces   AcJvity:  EvaluaJng  Professional  Profiles   Content  CuraJon     Media  Monitoring   Some  Challenges  and  Returning  to  Ethics    
  • Key  Concepts  for  Today   •  •  •  •  •  •  •    JournalisJc  Norms   PR  Professional  Norms   Content  “SJckiness”  vs.  “Spreadability”     Microblogging  and  Live-­‐tweeJng   Cross-­‐promoJon   Strength  of  Weak  Ties   Content  CuraJon  of  User-­‐generated  Content  
  • JournalisJc  Norms  on  Social  Media?   •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  ObligaJon  to  truth   Loyalty  to  the  public   VerificaJon   Independence     Forum  for  public  discourse   InteresJng  and  relevant   Comprehensive   Exercise  of  personal  conscience     Adapted  from  Kovach,  B.  &  RosensJel,  T.  (2007).  The  elements  of  journalism:  What   newspeople  should  know  and  what  the  public  should  expect.  New  York:  Three  Rivers   Press.    
  • PR  Professional  Norms  on  Social  Media?   •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  Serve  the  public  interest  as  responsible  advocates   Accuracy  and  truth   ExperJse  and  credibility     Independence   Loyalty  to  clients  while  serving  public  interest   Fairness  and  support  for  free  flow  of  informaJon   Fair  compeJJon   Disclosure  of  informaJon  and  conflicts  of  interest     Adapted  from  Public  RelaJons  Society  of  America  (n.d.).  Member  Code  of  Ethics.      
  • News  via  Social  Media   News  is  becoming  “social.”   Source:  Pew  Research  Journalism  Project.  (2013).  The  Facebook  News  Experience.      
  • Social  Media  MarkeJng   Marke5ng  is  becoming  “social”  too.   Source:  TwiGer  Business.  (2014).  A  connected  customer  is  an  engaged  customer.              
  • “If  it  doesn’t  spread,  it’s  dead.”   S5ckiness   •  •  •  •  •  •  •    MigraJons  of  individuals     Centralized  material   Pre-­‐structured  interacJvity   Unified  experiences   Broadcast  mentality   Sales  force  in  control   Separate  and  disJnct  roles   Spreadability   Flow  of  ideas   Dispersed  material   Open-­‐ended  parJcipaJon   Diversified  experiences     Temporary  and  localized   Good  ideas  circulate     “Grassroots  intermediaries”   spread  informaJon     •  CollaboraJon  across  roles   •  •  •  •  •  •  •             Source:  Jenkins  et  al.  (2013).  Spreadable  Media:                  Crea/ng  Value  and  Meaning  in  a  Networked  Culture.  
  • Mircoblogging       And  TwiFer  
  • “Live-­‐TweeJng”  Like  a  Pro   Tweet  about  what  interests  you.   Remember  the  “Who,  what,  when,  where,  why  and  how.”   Use  third-­‐person.   @menJon  your  sources.   Use  a  common  event  hashtag.   Make  it  mulJ-­‐media.   CapJon  your  photos:  idenJfy  individuals,  provide  context,   include  a  Jme/place  reference.   •  Keep  personal  opinions  to  a  minimum.  In  general,  audiences   will  care  about  the  event,  not  your  opinion.     •  •  •  •  •  •  • 
  • TwiGer  Best  PracJces   Choose  a  short  and  easy  to  remember  username.   Relevant  profile  photo,  ideally  a  headshot,  and  bio  that  reflects  you.     Follow  those  you  know  offline  and  network  in  your  industry.     Develop  rela5onships,  @men5ons  and  engage  with  followers.   Tweet  what  interests  you  –  professionally.   Think  first.  If  in  doubt,  don’t  post.     Verify  from  mul5ple  sources  before  pos5ng.   Space  out  your  tweets,  max  one  per  hour  unless  ive-­‐twee5ng.   Cross-­‐promote,  but  don’t  overdo  it.   Promote  colleagues:  Retweets,  @men5ons.    
  • Job  Seeking  and  Social  Media   Research  industry  standards.   Use  digital  profiles  as  networking  tools.   CulJvate  a  professional  online  presence.   Blog  and/or  join  social  media  conversaJons  in   your  desired  field.   •  Beware  of  what  you  post  online;  does  it  pass  the   “grandma  test”?  Don’t  rely  on  privacy  sejngs!   •  •  •  •   Almost  39  percent  of  employers  use  social  networking  sites  to    research  job  candidates,  according  to  CareerBuilder.  
  • LinkedIn  Tips   •  Include  a  professional  photo.              The  Strength  of  Weak  Ties   •  Headline  with  area  of  study      and/or  career  ambiJons.   •  Keyword-­‐rich  summary  that   includes  type  of  posiJons  you   are  seeking.   •  Include  volunteer  acJviJes,   internships  and  extracurriculars.   •  Get  recommendaJons.  
  • LinkedIn  Tips  (conJnued)              The  Strength  of  Weak  Ties   •  Start  with  “warm”  contacts.   •  Join  groups  and  professional   associaJons.   •  Research  companies  you’re   interested  in.   •  Reach  out  to  alumni.   •  Personalize  when  you  connect.   •  Focus  on  building  and   maintaining  relaJonships.  
  • Cross-­‐PromoJon     The  Journalist  as  a  Brand  
  • Cross-­‐PromoJon     The  Marke5ng  Professional  as  a  Brand  
  • AcJvity:  EvaluaJng  Professional  Profiles   In  small  groups  of  two  or  three,  evaluate  the  social   media  profiles  of  two  PR  professionals  and  two   journalists.       Your  handout  has  some  lists  suggesJons  to  locate   profiles  to  analyze.      
  • Content  CuraJon  and  Media     Monitoring  Tools      
  • Content  CuraJon  Tools     Create  TwiFer  Lists  
  • Content  CuraJon  Tools     Content  Management  (e.g.  HootSuite)   To  schedule  or  not  to  schedule?  
  • Content  CuraJon  Tools     Storify:  Collect     User-­‐Generated   Content  
  • Content  CuraJon  Tools     Storify     (con5nued):   Integra5ng    ar5cle  text     with  images    
  • Content  CuraJon  Tools     Storify     (con5nued):   Integra5ng    user-­‐generated   content    
  • New  Roles  and  the  “Content  Curator”   Develop  a  story  narraJve.   Stop  and  verify  through  mulJple  sources.   If  in  doubt,  don’t  include.   Communicate  with  your  sources  (direct  message,   email,  phone).   •  Trust  is  sJll  key.   •  Be  transparent.     •  •  •  • 
  • Tracking  Influence  and  Media  Monitoring   Men5on   Klout  
  • MenJon  Example              Global                Frackdown  
  • MenJon  Example              #GlobalFrackdown                (con5nued)  
  • Some  Challenges  and  Returning  to  Ethics    
  • The  Capacity  to  Spread  (False)  Info  Fast   Google  Image  Searching  a   Fake  Hurricane  Sandy   Picture     (Actually  a  screenshot  from   The  Day  A>er  Tomorrow)    
  • VerificaJon  of  User-­‐Generated  Content   The  Guardian,   October  29,  2012    
  • Losing  Control  of  Your  Brand   #Sochi2014    
  • Losing  Control  of  Your  Brand   #SochiProblems    
  • Returning  to  Professional  Norms   Journalis5c  Norms   •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •      ObligaJon  to  truth   Loyalty  to  the  public   VerificaJon   Independence     Forum  for  public  discourse   InteresJng  and  relevant   Comprehensive   Exercise  of  personal   conscience   Adapted  from  Kovach,  B.  &  RosensJel,  T.  (2007).  The  elements  of   journalism:  What  newspeople  should  know  and  what  the  public   should  expect.  New  York:  Three  Rivers  Press.   PR  Norms   Responsible  advocates   Accuracy  and  truth   ExperJse  and  credibility     Independence   Loyalty  to  clients     Fairness  and  support  for   free  flow  of  informaJon   •  Fair  compeJJon   •  Disclosure  of  informaJon     •  •  •  •  •  •    Adapted  from  Public  RelaJons  Society  of  America  (n.d.).   Member  Code  of  Ethics.      
  • Returning  to  Professional  Norms   1.  How  can  professional  communicators  uphold   professional  norms  in  the  social  media   environment?     2.  What  are  our  obligaJons  to  these  norms?     3.  How  might  social  media  help  journalists  do  their   jobs  beGer?     4.  What  about  for  strategic  communicators?     5.  How  might  you  balance  free  speech  with   professional  communicaJon?    
  • QuesJons?     Thank  you!   Jill  Hopke   jillhopke@gmail.com   @jillhopke   Jillhopke.com