Sensory powerpoint

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Sensory powerpoint

  1. 1. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 The senses and food
  2. 2. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Learning objectives <ul><li>To appreciate the different senses that are involved in eating food. </li></ul><ul><li>To name the senses that are used in tasting food and drink. </li></ul><ul><li>To recognise the 5 basic tastes. </li></ul><ul><li>To use appropriate sensory vocabulary when describing food. </li></ul>
  3. 3. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Which senses do we use? <ul><li>A range of senses are used when eating food. </li></ul><ul><li>These senses are: </li></ul><ul><li>sight; </li></ul><ul><li>smell; </li></ul><ul><li>hearing; </li></ul><ul><li>taste; </li></ul><ul><li>touch. </li></ul><ul><li>A combination of these senses enables you to evaluate a food. </li></ul>
  4. 4. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Appearance The size, shape, colour, temperature and surface texture all play an important part in helping to determine your first reaction to a food. Often if a food does not look appetising, then you will not eat it. Appearance is therefore vitally important if you want your food to be eaten and enjoyed.
  5. 5. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Appearance Useful words to describe appearance: stringy firm dry heavy flaky crumbly flat crisp lumpy fizzy fluffy smooth crystalline hard mushy cuboid sticky fragile dull
  6. 6. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Appearance What words would you use to describe these foods? ?
  7. 7. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Odour The nose detects volatile aromas released from food. An odour may be described by association with a particular food, e.g. herby, cheesy, fishy. The intensity can also be recorded. Odour and taste work together to produce flavour. This is the reason why people with a blocked nose find it difficult to determine the flavours of foods.
  8. 8. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Odour Useful words to describe odour: aromatic pungent spicy floral bland tainted perfumed rancid savoury rotten tart citrus acrid strong mild musty weak scented fragrant
  9. 9. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Odour What words would you use to describe these foods? ?
  10. 10. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Sound The sounds of food being prepared, cooked, served and eaten all help to influence our preferences.
  11. 11. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Sound What words would you use to describe these foods? ?
  12. 12. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Taste <ul><li>The tongue can detect five basic tastes: </li></ul><ul><li>bitter; </li></ul><ul><li>salt; </li></ul><ul><li>sour; </li></ul><ul><li>sweet; </li></ul><ul><li>umami. </li></ul><ul><li>Taste may be described by association with a particular food, e.g. meaty, minty or fruity. </li></ul><ul><li>The intensity can also be recorded, e.g. mild or strong Cheddar. </li></ul>
  13. 13. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 What is umami? Umami is a savoury taste, often known as the fifth taste. It is a subtle taste and blends well with other tastes. It was discovered by Dr Kikumae Ikeda, from Tokyo Imperial University, Japan, in 1908. He undertook research into Dashi, a traditional Japanese stock made from kombu (kelp). Umami has its own distinct savoury taste, often associated with ripe tomatoes and cheese.
  14. 14. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Taste Useful words to describe taste: sweet cool bitter umami zesty warm hot tangy sour sharp rich salty bland rancid tart acidic strong citrus mild savoury spicy tainted weak
  15. 15. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Taste What words would you use to describe these foods? ?
  16. 16. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Texture Texture can be assessed through touch. When food is placed in the mouth, the surface of the tongue and other sensitive skin reacts to the feel of the surface of the food. The sensation is also known as mouth-feel. Different sensations are felt as the food is chewed. The resistance to chewing also affects texture, e.g. chewiness, springiness. The viscosity is also a factor, e.g. runny, thick. The mouth also detects temperature, which plays an important stimulus, e.g. cold icecream, warm bread, hot soup.
  17. 17. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Texture Useful words to describe texture: brittle rubbery short gritty clammy close stodgy bubbly sandy tacky tender waxy open soft firm flaky crisp fluffy dry crumbly lumpy smooth hard mushy sticky chalky grainy fibrous
  18. 18. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Texture What words would you use to describe these foods? ?
  19. 19. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Other factors <ul><li>Although the senses play an important role in determining our food preferences, and helping us to evaluate food, other factors are also involved. </li></ul><ul><li>These include: </li></ul><ul><li>previous experiences with food; </li></ul><ul><li>hunger and satiety; </li></ul><ul><li>mood; </li></ul><ul><li>where you eat, e.g. home, canteen, picnic; </li></ul><ul><li>beliefs and values, e.g. religion, culture and tradition. </li></ul><ul><li>social aspects, e.g. special occasions, events. </li></ul>
  20. 20. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Using your senses <ul><li>The senses help to: </li></ul><ul><li>develop personal food preferences (likes/dislikes); </li></ul><ul><li>evaluate foods, either through preference or discrimination tests. </li></ul>
  21. 21. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 Summary <ul><li>There are 5 senses used when tasting food and drink, e.g. sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch. </li></ul><ul><li>There are 5 basic tastes – salt, sugar, bitter, sour and umami. </li></ul><ul><li>A range of sensory vocabulary should be used when describing food. </li></ul>
  22. 22. © British Nutrition Foundation 2010 For further information, go to: www.foodafactoflife.org.uk

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