Accommodations
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Accommodations

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Designing instruction for students on IEP's

Designing instruction for students on IEP's

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  • How impressive to have included such useful strategies and accommodations in all of these general ed classes!
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    Accommodations Accommodations Presentation Transcript

    • What,  Why  and  How  of   Accommoda1ons  and  Modifica1ons    •  What  is  an  accommoda-on?  •  What  is  a  modifica-on?  
    • Defini1ons  •  Accommodaons  are  changes  to  the  way  a   student  is  expected  to  learn  or  how  the   student  is  assessed.    •  Modificaons  are  changes  to  what  the   student  is  expected  to  learn  and/or  the   standards  the  student  is  expected  to  meet.    
    • IDEA      Only  an  IEP  Team  can  make  modifica1ons  to  a   student s  educa1onal  program.      IEP  teams  also  specify  what  accommoda1ons,   if  any,  are  needed.      Teachers  are  legally  responsible  for  providing   accommoda1ons  specified  in  IEPs.  
    • Central  Ques1on        Can  the  student  par-cipate  in  and   benefit  from  the  lesson  in  the  same   way  as  all  other  students?         …..  or  are  accommoda-ons  needed?    
    •        Accommoda-ons      •  Change  how  something  is  taught–  not  what  is   taught  or  what  standards  a  student  is   expected  to  meet.  •  Do  not  change  the  instruc1onal  level,  content   or  criteria  for  mee1ng  a  standard  •  Examples:   •  a  student  who  struggles  with  wri1ng  may  give  answers   orally   •  a  struggling  reader  may  be  given  books  on  tape  
    • Accommoda-ons  in  Presenta-on                alter  how  direc1ons  and   content  are  delivered  to   students.  
    • Some  examples  of  accommoda1ons  in  presenta1on  include:      •  Oral  reading  (either  by  an  adult  or  a  tape)    •  Large  print    •  Magnifica1on  devices    •  Sign  language    •  Braille  and  Nemeth  Code  (a  specific  type  of  Braille  used  for  math  and   science  nota1ons)    •  Tac1le  graphics  (e.g.;  3-­‐D  topographical  maps,  2-­‐D  raised  line  drawings)    •  Manipula1ves  (e.g.;  geometric  solids,  real  coins  &  currency,  abacus)    •  Audio  amplifica1on  devices  (e.g.,  hearing  aids)    •  Screen  reader    
    • Response  Accommoda-ons                  allow  for  different  ways   students  may  demonstrate   learning  (or  respond  to   assessment)  
    • Response  Accommoda-ons  Include:  •  Verbal  rather  than  wriZen  responses    •  Responses  may  be  dictated  to  a  scribe    •  Use  of  a  tape  recorder  to  capture  responses    •  Answers  to  be  recorded  directly  into  test  booklet  •  Use  of  organiza1onal  devices,  including  calcula1on   devices,  spelling  and  grammar  assis1ve  devices,  visual   organizers,  or  graphic  organizers    
    • Se?ng  Accommoda-ons        are  changes  either  where  an  assignment  and/ or  test  is  taken  or  the  environment  in  which   the  work  is  completed  
    • Not  Ideal  
    • A  lil  beZer…..  
    • Se?ng  Accommoda-ons  Include:          •  Working  in  a  small  group   or  individually  in  separate   room    •  Adjus1ng  the  ligh1ng    •  Providing  noise  buffers   such  as  headphones,   earphones,  or  earplugs    
    • Timing/Scheduling  Accommoda-ons        allow  flexibility  in  the  schedule  of  an   assignment  or  assessment  especially  for   students  who   –  may  need  more  1me  to  process  informa1on  or     –  may  need  breaks  throughout  the  tes1ng  process   to  regroup  and  refocus   –  may  need  change  in  tes1ng  schedule  or  order  of   subjects  
    • Making  Cri1cal  Decisions  •  The  challenge  is  to  decide  which  accommoda1ons   will  help  students  learn  new  skills  and  knowledge— and  which  will  help  them  demonstrate  what  theyve   learned  (Shriner  &  DeStefano,  2003).      •  Accommoda1ons  are  most  effec1ve  when  they  are   based  on  individual  strengths  and  needs  rather  than   disability  type.      
    • IEP  Team  Determines  Accommoda1ons  •  Considers  the  specific  strengths,  challenges,   and  rou1nes  of  a  student    •  Decides  if  a  student  needs  accommoda1ons  in   the  classroom  or  in  tes1ng    •  Decides  what  accommoda1ons  are  needed  
    •     Student  Involvement    •  Increases  likelihood  of  selec1ng   most  effec1ve  accommoda1ons  •  Recognizes  them  as  valued   par1cipants  •  May  increase  their  sense  of   increased  control  and   responsibility  in  their  learning  
    • Monitoring  the  Impact  Some  things  to  consider  include:   •  Did  the  student  actually  use  and  take  advantage  of  the   accommoda-on?     •  Was  the  student  able  to  master  the  objec-ves  of  the   lesson  or  course  because  of  the  accommoda-on?     •  Was  the  student  able  to  fully  par-cipate  in  the  class   because  of  the  accommoda-on?   •  Did  the  accommoda1on  help  the  student  feel  more   successful  in  class?  
    • •  The  Online  Accommoda-ons  Bibliography  at   the  Na1onal  Center  on  Educa1onal  Outcomes   (NCEO)  is  an  excellent  source  of  informa1on   on  the  range  of  possible  accommoda1ons    •  hZp://cehd.umn.edu/nceo/ AccomStudies.htm