Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Creating her Sense of Self: Integrative Learning,  ePortfolio, and  Feminist Advising Rebecca Reynolds Assistant Dean Dire...
Intro: Douglass Residential College <ul><li>founded 1918 as New Jersey College for women, became “residential college” in ...
Geographic: 13.3% out of state and international  Ethnic: Enrollment figures, Douglass Residential College, Entering class...
Requirements <ul><li>First year students take course, “Knowledge and Power: Issues in Women’s Leadership” through WGS </li...
Pathways  <ul><li>integrative curricular model: students can choose among themed clusters of academic work and co-curricul...
Evolution of ePortfolio: how we started   <ul><li>Launched in 2008, the ePortfolio would serve as a professional developme...
From first to second year of ePortfolio implementation <ul><li>2008-2009:  training and surveys, emphasized use of eP as p...
<ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal/site/18bdcbb8-3b18-4d1c-92de-5...
 
Advising Women: first year students
 
“ I believe that laughter is the best calorie burner and that glitter can make anything look better. Ballet is a sport, po...
Y. Aguilera,  https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal/tool/833f7f18-f7ca-4543-bebf-a5502666ab44/viewPresentation.osp?id=A6E55EC7D...
We live in a society where it is still easier for women to gain approval and attention for their bodies and physical attri...
. . . Women have been asked to learn the experience of men and accept it as representative of all human experience. (e.g.,...
<ul><li>Some of the core principles of feminist pedagogy include:  </li></ul><ul><li>•  recognition that social inequaliti...
Feminist Education <ul><li>. . . Values experiences as sources of knowing </li></ul><ul><li>. . . Values disciplinary and ...
Reflection: Experience as Evidence <ul><li>. . . The learner is situated at the center of her own learning process as an i...
<ul><li>Mary, “Mirrors: A Reflection on Identity”   https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?i...
Douglass Advising Framework <ul><li>Integrative learning : pathways connect our students’ learning experiences across mult...
Self-Authorship <ul><li>central feature of theories of men’s development . . . Refers to separating from others to functio...
Integrative and Intentional Learning: In 2003, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Association...
<ul><li>Hira </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=36131A144B70E98A941...
Artwork by visiting artist and poet, Cecilia Vicuňa  (on Rachel’s site)
A quipu [Cecilia Vicuña] is a knot.  “A mental quipu” is a mental knot I like that.  I like the idea of seeing thought as ...
<ul><li>AS students create ePortfolios they:  </li></ul><ul><li>develop statements about their sense of purpose and identi...
Photo credits—from student ePortfolios <ul><li>Slide 6, Skyla Pojednic  </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 10, Yolanda Aguilera </li>...
<ul><li>Sophomores & juniors </li></ul><ul><li>Karin </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/vie...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Creating Her Sense of Self: Feminist Advising, ePortfolio, and Integrative Learning - Rutgers University

1,208

Published on

Creating Her Sense of Self: Feminist Advising, ePortfolio, and Integrative Learning
Rutgers University

What do ePortfolios reveal about the ways in which women students create a sense of identity as learners through self representation and reflection? What insights do they provide into women’s leadership and the possibilities for social change? Douglass Residential College, the women’s college
at Rutgers, has been exploring these questions through an ePortfolio project that supports integration, feminist advising strategies and pedagogical principles. Student ePortfolios
will be shown.
• Rebecca Reynolds, Assistant Dean, Douglass Residential College

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,208
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Pull up ePortfolios plus Sakai (Chi Chi’s ePort) and the site Notes “ This presentation will describe the evolution of the eP project at Douglass Residential College, the women*s college at Rutgers; both how we have been using  e-portfolio to support feminist advising strategies and pedagogical principles, and what this tells us about the ways in which particular women students create a sense of identity as learners through self-representation and reflection. Integrated student ePortfolios will be shown.” Caveats: using eP in advising and in defining advising framework for the college; however, we are also incorporating an assignment in first year course (evolving); my background as poet—interest in the way that form is related to content—how the structure of the ePortfolio, and the context in which we’re presenting it, influence the way our students are using it Finally; choice of Cassat—might or might be clear, but I was intrigued by the image of a woman performing a daily act that involves reflection, and the notion that a woman artist is depicting a woman who is seeing herself—and to some extent, hat her vision of herself is not wholly visible to us—raises questions about the way we report and depict experience, and I hope, somewhat complicates our conversations about reflection;
  • In other words, we don’t offer degrees; challenge became to create an advising and curricular framework without a curriculum or faculty --required first year course, “knowledge and power” emphasizes critical reflections on gender and representation (explores relationship between power and the production of knowledge, and social constructions of gender/identity); the only course that we require and run; means that students gain an awareness of the multiple ways that gender may impact one’s identity, and this awareness is very present in the ePortfolios in different ways In this presentation, I want to talk about first year students, DRC advising framework, the possibility of a feminist advising framework, and more integrated student portfolios (juniors), as well as next steps . . .
  • New Brunswick = 10% African American women, 8% overall 11% Latino (vs. 21%) women, 10% overall 25% Asian women, 25% overall Figures: I’m interested in the ways in which identities intersect with gender and have an influence on self-representation
  • ePortfolio includes “My Path” page; matrix includes space to reflect on multiple learning experiences
  • Look at ePortfolio (switch to Sakai site)
  • Note: Talk about next slide femininity/how might it help/hinder student’s learning? What in her statement is positive and what might be problematic?
  • Her emphasis on female experience is assertive, emphatic, challenging, defiant . . . Being female is framed as a source of power . . . Chose to live in an environment where ideas about women’s strength are very much at the forefront . . . so it isn’t surprising that her “about me” statement responds and incorporates a lot of these messages about gender and feminine identity . . . Yet . . . What she identifies with are stereotype—mixed in with a wish to re-frame ideas about knowledge idea about career (helping others) is prototypically female—wanting to help others reflects emphasis on connection . . . vs. intellectual fulfillment or broader sense of purpose in the world (because “it makes me happy”) How do advisors help students discover intellectual content and strengths – how does that connect to “helping others”
  • Glitter and pink . . .
  • Most of the students in ePortfolios—emphasis on “helping others” “ making other people happy”
  • All of these principles are fundamental to ePortfolio practice
  • Task of women students (and students of color, et. al.): to reflect on experience that has been influenced by identity which has already been constituted as “female” or “other” To ignore, integrate/incorporate, reject, or foreground as subject of critical inquiry; To integrate in learning project
  • ePortfolio is instrumental in furthering these goals—encouraging students to articulate their experience within ePortfolio reflects goals of a feminist pedagogy—based on Freire’s model
  • Come back to idea of “helping others” as a central expression of women students’ tendency to think about themselves in relation to others—goal is to encourage students to deepen their understanding of their role to INCLUDE their intellectual interests; so that a personal statement might be more structured around career goals and sense of connection
  • Pathways informed by work on integrative learning—even though we’re unable to have affect on curriculum, we can encourage students to think in integrative ways about their experience
  • First Year ePortfolios: Brianna and Yolanda, Vicky, Elaf—identity, connection Rachel—connection/interview Kae—integrating interests—science and creativity Second Year: Skyla: creativity, discovery, self-creation (video) Karin—discovery (honors pathway), integration of interests and gender issues Juniors: Janina, Hira, Chi Chi (Sakai), emphasis on social justice/integration of academic interests with identity, perception, and goals
  • Transcript of "Creating Her Sense of Self: Feminist Advising, ePortfolio, and Integrative Learning - Rutgers University"

    1. 1. Creating her Sense of Self: Integrative Learning, ePortfolio, and Feminist Advising Rebecca Reynolds Assistant Dean Director of Pathway Advising Douglass Residential College
    2. 2. Intro: Douglass Residential College <ul><li>founded 1918 as New Jersey College for women, became “residential college” in 2007; </li></ul><ul><li>approximately 1600 current students who are also enrolled in Rutgers’ undergraduate schools </li></ul>
    3. 3. Geographic: 13.3% out of state and international Ethnic: Enrollment figures, Douglass Residential College, Entering class, 2009 (geographic and racial/ethnic)
    4. 4. Requirements <ul><li>First year students take course, “Knowledge and Power: Issues in Women’s Leadership” through WGS </li></ul><ul><li>Externship (mini-internships with alumnae in variety of professional fields) </li></ul><ul><li>ePortfolio, with evidence of students academic and co-curricular pathways </li></ul><ul><li>Minimum 1-year residency on campus (with exception of commuter students) </li></ul>
    5. 5. Pathways <ul><li>integrative curricular model: students can choose among themed clusters of academic work and co-curricular programs, e.g., “global Issues,” “leadership,” “arts and creativity,” “research and honors,” “STEM,” “business,” or “self-designed”; </li></ul><ul><li>pathways are voluntary, but serve as guidelines, encouraging students to integrate classroom work with non-classroom experiences; </li></ul><ul><li>Douglass advisors encourage students to explore & connect non-classroom opportunities to major or minor focus </li></ul>
    6. 6. Evolution of ePortfolio: how we started <ul><li>Launched in 2008, the ePortfolio would serve as a professional development tool, a web showcase for students’ achievements </li></ul><ul><li>Modeled on Douglass’s educational pathways: eP would reflect integration of academic and co-curricular experience over course of college career </li></ul>
    7. 7. From first to second year of ePortfolio implementation <ul><li>2008-2009: training and surveys, emphasized use of eP as professional tool (“resume on steroids”); </li></ul><ul><li>2009-2010: developed more dynamic site, added templates, emphasized creativity to encourage use; </li></ul><ul><li>2010 – 2011 needs: critical assessment tool for students, advisors, and “Knowledge & Power” instructors; partnering with library’s new media center for series of instructional workshops (piloting with three sections of “Knowledge and Power.”) Developing more structured assignment. </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal/site/18bdcbb8-3b18-4d1c-92de-5cd110641079/page/b07e5a2d-c1df-4ac5-a8d8-77099fbab5d6 </li></ul><ul><li>e-Portfolio reflects pathway model: “My Path” page </li></ul><ul><li>and matrix </li></ul>
    9. 10. Advising Women: first year students
    10. 12. “ I believe that laughter is the best calorie burner and that glitter can make anything look better. Ballet is a sport, politics is an automatic headache, and ice-cream should always be served at dinner. I think that knowing all of the words to a song is overrated and that improvisation is best. Sometimes I smile for no reason and I am a strong believer that the color pink can solve any problem . . .                     . . . I believe that college is going to bring me one step closer to saving the world, and that I will overcome any obstacle put in my path. I dream of going into medicine because helping others has always been what makes me happy. . . Over the course of these next four years at R.U, I plan on growing intellectually and reaching outside of my comfort zone. I am determined to be a valid candidate for medical school and will work to the best of my ability to be just that.” F irst year student, ePortfolio “About Me”
    11. 13. Y. Aguilera, https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal/tool/833f7f18-f7ca-4543-bebf-a5502666ab44/viewPresentation.osp?id=A6E55EC7D44A5FDD36A27EAA86F180D7&page=myPathway&subPage=0
    12. 14. We live in a society where it is still easier for women to gain approval and attention for their bodies and physical attributes than for the quality of their minds. Cultural and historical definitions of femininity reinforce this message. Lists of traditional feminine stereotypes read like recipes for Western anti-intellectualism (Gallos, 1982). We send modern women mixed messages: ignore the stereotypes but remain feminine . . . Gallos, Joan V. &quot;Gender and silence.&quot; College Teaching 43.3 (1995): 101. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 25 Apr. 2010. Frameworks
    13. 15. . . . Women have been asked to learn the experience of men and accept it as representative of all human experience. (e.g., Kohlberg 1981; Vaillant 1977). Gallos Societal conceptions of knowledge, learning, and individual development are androcentric. Men have historically been the &quot;fact-makers,&quot; in Hubbard's terms (1988). They have designed and conducted the research, served as research subjects, proposed the theories, written the histories, defined the procedures for science and instruction, established standards, controlled access to institutions, and set the public policies.
    14. 16. <ul><li>Some of the core principles of feminist pedagogy include: </li></ul><ul><li>• recognition that social inequalities exist in society; </li></ul><ul><li>• empowerment of the student; </li></ul><ul><li>• a “reformation” of the professor-student relationship so that all individuals both share and acquire knowledge; </li></ul><ul><li>• privileging the individual voice, and; </li></ul><ul><li>• the respect and valuation of diverse personal experiences. </li></ul>The Possibility of Feminist Advising Durfee, Alesha and Rosenberg, Karen. “Teaching Sensitive Issues: Feminist Pedagogy and the Practice of Advocacy Based Counseling.” Feminist Teacher 19 (2009): 103-121.
    15. 17. Feminist Education <ul><li>. . . Values experiences as sources of knowing </li></ul><ul><li>. . . Values disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>. . . Recognizes the effect that gender or other identity characteristics have on educational processes and outcomes; </li></ul><ul><li>. . . Recognizes and draws attention to the role of education in social change </li></ul>Ropers-Huilman, Becky, and Palmer, Betsy. &quot;Feminist and Civic Education.&quot; Most College Students are Women. Ed. Jeanie K. Allen, Diane R. Dean, Susan J. Bracken. Sterling, Virginia: Stylus, 2008. Skyla
    16. 18. Reflection: Experience as Evidence <ul><li>. . . The learner is situated at the center of her own learning process as an interpreter of experience as well as the agent of future actions . . . </li></ul>Taylor, Kathleen and Marienau, Catherine. “Efffective Practices in Fostering Developmental Growth in Women Learners: A View from Neurophysiology.” Jeanie K. Allen, Diane R. Dean, Susan J. Bracken (Eds.), Most College Students are Women (pp 29-53). Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, 2008. Experience is at once always already an interpretation and it is in need of interpretation. What counts as experience is neither self-evident not straightforward; it is always contested, always therefore political. Scott, Joan. &quot;The Evidence of Experience.&quot; Critical Inquiry 17.4 (1991): 773. Literary Reference Center. EBSCO. Web. 25 Apr. 2010.
    17. 19. <ul><li>Mary, “Mirrors: A Reflection on Identity” https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=C437BE1DE03F24AB7A213AEBA855EC2D&page=aboutMe&subPage=0https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=C437BE1DE03F24AB7A213AEBA855EC2D&page=aboutMe&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>Vicky, Bunting Student, mother </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=741B562BB15BA87A9CE8683E4FE36FA6&page=home&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>Elaf, identity </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=34B264FE80015145EE9D9C918E7C96FD&page=home&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>Kae, Integrating interests </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=52A8077C28F38FFAA10A72CD3CD13A73&page=home&subPage=0 </li></ul>
    18. 20. Douglass Advising Framework <ul><li>Integrative learning : pathways connect our students’ learning experiences across multiple domains </li></ul><ul><li>Self-authorship : students reflect on their own experience (ePortfolio, Mission course, dialogue with advisors) </li></ul><ul><li>Feminist principles : power to create knowledge and the power to make decisions resides with student, not the advisor </li></ul><ul><li>“ In terms of feminist pedagogy, the authority of the feminist teacher [advisor, mentor] as intellectual and theorist finds expression in the goal of making students themselves theorists of their own lives by interrogating and analyzing their own experience” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Weiler, K. &quot;Freire and a feminist pedagogy of difference.&quot; Harvard Educational Review 61.4 (1991): 449. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 25 Apr. 2010. </li></ul></ul>
    19. 21. Self-Authorship <ul><li>central feature of theories of men’s development . . . Refers to separating from others to function as an autonomous individual. . . Self-authorship does not connote the historical emphasis on the individuating, agentic self; instead it reflects an authentic self that is capable of genuine connection to others and the world. </li></ul>Baxter Magolda, Marcia B. “Learning Partnerships: A Gender Inclusive Model for Undergraduate Teaching.” Jeanie K. Allen, Diane R. Dean, Susan J. Bracken (Eds.), Most College Students are Women (pp 29-53). Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, 2008. Connection, a central feature of theories of women’s development . . . Refers to the ability to link with others and function in collaborative ways. Autonomy, a Chinaza Okonkwo
    20. 22. Integrative and Intentional Learning: In 2003, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) launched a project to promote “integrative learning.” . The undergraduate experience can be a fragmented landscape of general education courses, preparation for the major, co-curricular activities, and “the real world” beyond the campus. But an emphasis on integrative learning can help undergraduates put the pieces together and develop habits of mind that prepare them to make informed judgments in the conduct of personal, professional, and civic life. A Statement on Integrative Learning. 2004. Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. http://www.carnegiefoundation.org/dynamic/downloads/file_1_185.pdf
    21. 23. <ul><li>Hira </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=36131A144B70E98A941479B1AE303FAF&page=home&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>Janina </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?panel=presentation&id=C7BC5F74D2D093DFDB267B420B4E3A29&sakai.tool.placement.id=833f7f18-f7ca-4543-bebf-a5502666ab44 </li></ul><ul><li>Chi Chi </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?panel=presentation&id=C7BC5F74D2D093DFDB267B420B4E3A29&sakai.tool.placement.id=833f7f18-f7ca-4543-bebf-a5502666ab44 </li></ul><ul><li>Skyla </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=B592AD14ACDF46ADAD9DE7539847D024&page=aboutMe&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>First Year </li></ul><ul><li>Yolanda </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal/tool/833f7f18-f7ca-4543-bebf-a5502666ab44/viewPresentation.osp?id=A6E55EC7D44A5FDD36A27EAA86F180D7&page=home&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>Kae </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=52A8077C28F38FFAA10A72CD3CD13A73&page=home&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>Elaf </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=34B264FE80015145EE9D9C918E7C96FD&sakai.tool.placement.id=8833f7f18-f7ca-4543-bebf-a5502666ab44 </li></ul><ul><li>Rumela </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=00CCCC076A5B9F14EBAEC99B15A31A2B&page=home&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>Mary G </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=C437BE1DE03F24AB7A213AEBA855EC2D&page=home&subPage=0 </li></ul>
    22. 24. Artwork by visiting artist and poet, Cecilia Vicuňa (on Rachel’s site)
    23. 25. A quipu [Cecilia Vicuña] is a knot. “A mental quipu” is a mental knot I like that. I like the idea of seeing thought as knots. A thought as a visual image of knowledge is very appealing. . . All the images, idea, memories are somehow all interconnected in each of our heads . . . The interview is to help me see the life of woman in a career field that I am interested in, and I think of her life as a quipu. Every time I ask a question, her thoughts will be like mine, associating memories and thoughts with the words. She “will...reflect upon [her] experience and choose for [herself] which experiences and feelings are central to [her] sense of [her] past” (Kathryn Anderson 6). I will have her “vocal quality and body language, not through words alone” to piece together her life. (Kathryn Anderson 2). Even though I will write a transcription of the interview, my paper weaving our lives together will bring in my own quipu. The paper will be like the shadow of the quipus together in the picture of the hand with strings. Rachel, first year student, reflecting on artwork of Cecilia Vicuña, and relating the artwork to interview assignment, Knowledge and Power Rachel’s Reflection on Interview Assignment
    24. 26. <ul><li>AS students create ePortfolios they: </li></ul><ul><li>develop statements about their sense of purpose and identity as learners </li></ul><ul><li>integrate personal background & experience with academic goals (as “lifetime learners”)--ePortfolios reveal how students learn across multiple sites; </li></ul><ul><li>develop technical, visual, graphic understanding of electronic media; </li></ul><ul><li>women students (et. al.) define identity and voice against backdrop of expectations </li></ul>
    25. 27. Photo credits—from student ePortfolios <ul><li>Slide 6, Skyla Pojednic </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 10, Yolanda Aguilera </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 11, Mary Gismond </li></ul><ul><li>Slide 12, </li></ul><ul><li>14, Yolanda </li></ul><ul><li>17, Skyla </li></ul><ul><li>20, Chinaza Okonkwo </li></ul><ul><li>23, Vicuňa photo from exhibit </li></ul>
    26. 28. <ul><li>Sophomores & juniors </li></ul><ul><li>Karin </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=D627A3F1EF4DB205C7B2A35E6E700722&page=aboutMe&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>Skyla </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=B592AD14ACDF46ADAD9DE7539847D024&page=aboutMe&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>Janine – Junior </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?panel=presentation&id=C7BC5F74D2D093DFDB267B420B4E3A29&sakai.tool.placement.id=833f7f18-f7ca-4543-bebf-a5502666ab44 </li></ul><ul><li>Chi Chi </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal/tool/833f7f18-f7ca-4543-bebf-a5502666ab44/viewPresentation.osp?id=2A6D489DF44FA0319873C7A82D27080A&page=home&subPage=0 </li></ul><ul><li>Daphney </li></ul><ul><li>https://sakai.rutgers.edu/osp-presentation-tool/viewPresentation.osp?id=E9E29F960EBFFC58E1D628E1A7BFACD3&page=home&subPage=0 </li></ul>
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×