Week 8 MICE industry
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Week 8 MICE industry Presentation Transcript

  • 1. MICE Meeting, Incentive, Convention and Exhibition Industry . 2248 email: tpavit@wu.ac.th THM-201 Tourism and Hospitality Management
  • 2. Objectives 1. Know about the major players in the convention industry 2. Describe destination management companies 3. Describe the different aspects of being a meeting planner 4. Describe the different type of meeting 5. Know the various venues for meeting Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 3. Outline 1. Development of the Industry 2. Size and Scope 3. Key Players 4. Convention and Visitors Bureaus 5. Destination Management Companies 6. Meeting Planners and Service Contractors 7. Types of Meetings, Conventions, and Expositions 8. Types of Associations and Meetings 9. Venues 10. Trends Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 4. Development of the Industry People have gathered to attend meetings, conventions, and expositions since the ancient times Mainly for social, sporting, political, or religious purposes Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 5. Development of the Industry Associations go back many centuries to the Middle Ages and before The guilds in Europe were created during the Middle Ages to secure proper wages and maintain work standards Associations began in the United States at the beginning of the eighteenth century, when Rhode Island candle makers organized themselves Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 6. Development of the Industry Meetings, incentive travel, conventions, and exhibitions (MICE) represent a segment of the tourism industry that has grown in recent years MICE tourists spend about twice the amount of money that other tourists spend Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 7. Development of the Industry MICE industry is one of the fastest growing segments within the tourism industry generating millions in revenues for cities and countries. Europe and United States still remain the major markets worldwide in respect of the number of meetings, conferences and exhibitions. Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 8. Size and Scope of the Industry American Society of Association Executives (ASAE): 23,000 members 6,000 associations at national level Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 9. Size and Scope of the Industry Associations are the main independent political force for industries such as hospitality, offering the following benefits: Governmental/political voice Marketing avenues Education Member services Networking Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 10. The Industry Stakeholders Delegates Delegates Hotels Exhibit design Facilities Destination PCOs and management Convention managers Companies Exhibitors Transportation Audiovisual Convention services Bureaus Exhibition/trade show Exhibition service managers contractors Associations Food Services Delegates Delegates Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 11. Key Players The major players in the convention industry are 1. convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs) 2. meeting planners and their clients 3. the convention center 4. specialized services 5. exhibitions Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 12. Convention and Visitors Bureaus Not-for-profit umbrella organization that represents an urban area that tries to solicit business- or pleasure-seeking visitors Primary outcome is to generate and increase revenues of a city www.tceb.or.th Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 13. Convention and Visitors Bureaus The convention and visitors bureau comprise a number of visitor industry representing the various industry sectors: 1. Transportation 2. Hotels 3. Restaurants 4. Attractions 5. Supplies Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 14. Convention and Visitors Bureaus 1. Enhance the image of tourism in the local/city area 2. Market the area and encourage people to visit and stay longer 3. Encourages associations and others to hold meetings, conventions, and trade shows in the area it represents 4. Assists associations and others with preparations and lends support 5. Encourages tourists to partake of the historic, cultural, and recreational opportunities the city or area has to offer Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 15. Convention Center Utilization Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 16. Destination Management Companies Service organizations within the visitor industry that offers a host of programs and services to meet clients’ needs Initially, a destination management sales manager concentrates on selling the destination to meeting planners and performance improvement companies (incentive houses) Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 17. Meeting Planners May be independent contractors who contract out their services to both associations and corporations as the need arises or they may be full-time employees of corporations or associations Plans the meeting down to the last minute Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 18. Meeting Planners Premeeting Activities Estimate attendance Plan meeting agenda Establish meeting objectives Set meeting budget Select city location and site Plan exhibition Plan travel to and from site Arrange ground transportation Organize audiovisual needs Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 19. Meeting Planners On-Site Activities Conduct ore-event briefing Prepare VIP plan Facilitate people movement Approve expenditures Postmeeting Activities Debrief Evaluate Give recognition and appreciation Plan for next year Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 20. Service Contractors The individual responsible for providing all of the services needed to run the facilities for a trade show Hired by the exposition show manager or association meeting planner Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 21. Types of Meetings Clinic: Workshop-type educational experience in which attendees learn by doing Forum: An assembly for the discussion of common concerns Seminar: A lecture and a dialogue that allow participants to share experiences in a particular field Symposium: An event at which a particular subject is discussed by experts and opinions are gathered Workshop: A small group led by a facilitator or trainer Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 22. Meeting Setups Theatre style: Large audience that does not need notes Classroom setup: Meeting setup is instructional Workshop style Boardroom setup: Small numbers of people Meeting takes place around one block rectangular table Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 23. Association Meetings Things at the top of the list of places for an association meeting planner to choose from include the destination’s availability of hotel and facilities, ease of transportation, distance from attendees, transportation costs, and food and beverage Members attend association meetings voluntarily, so the hotel should work with meeting planners to make the destination appealing Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 24. Conventions and Expositions Conventions are larger meetings with some form of exposition or trade show included The majority are held in large hotels over a 3-5 day period Expositions are events that bring together sellers of products and services at a location where they can show their products and services to a group of attendees at a convention or trade show Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 25. Types of Associations Trade association Professional association Medical and scientific association Religious organizations Government organizations Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 26. Types of Meetings Annual meetings Board, committee, seminars and workshops, professional and technical meetings Corporate meetings, conventions, and expositions Social, military, educational, religious, and fraternal; brotherly groups (SMERF) Incentive meetings Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 27. Meeting Planning Needs analysis Pre-meeting activities Budget Plan agenda Request for proposal Set budget Negotiate contracts Site inspection On-site activities Selection Post meetings Negotiation Contracts Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 28. Contracts The contract is a legal document that binds two or more parties Essential elements: Offer Consideration Acceptance Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 29. Venues for Meetings City Centers Convention Centers Conference Centers Hotels and Resorts Cruise Ships Colleges and Universities Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 30. Venues 1. Residential Venues Residential venues are any venue that provides both residential accommodation and convention and meeting-style facilities, for example: Resort Hotel, Central Business District Hotels (CBD), Airport Hotels, Suburban Hotels, Boutique Hotels, Residential conference centers Colleges and University Cruise Ships Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 31. Venues 2. Nonresidential Venues = Only provide convention and meeting facilities * other venues for MICE events that exclude the provision of lodging indicated or purpose-built convention centers exhibition halls arenas & stadium Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 32. Venues 3. Special Venues these have been specifically selected for particular MICE events, e.g. historical buildings, museum, zoos, landmarks Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 33. Trends More people are going abroad to attend meetings Some international shows do not travel very well (i.e., agricultural machinery); thus, organizations such as Bleinheim & Reed Exposition Group airlift components and create shows in other countries Competitiveness has increased among all destinations Convention centers will expand and new centers will come online The industry needs to be more sophisticated—the need for fiber optics is present everywhere Shows are growing at a rate of 5-10 percent per year Compared to a few years ago, large conventions are not as well attended and regional conventions have more attendees Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul
  • 34. The End Q&A Introduction to Hospitality, John Walker By Aj. Pavit Tansakul