Week 8 Dining Etiquette 3 2552

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Week 8 Dining Etiquette 3 2552

  1. 1. Week 8 Dining Etiquette Email: tpavit@wu.ac.th . 2248 http://tourism.wu.ac.th 1
  2. 2. Objective 1. To help you perform with graciousness and poise at the table. 2. Provide you with knowledge, self-confidence and skills needed for a successful social and business life. 3. Teach you how to handle meal situations and make a big difference in your image. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 2
  3. 3. Outline • Introduction to Etiquette • Appearance and Hygiene • Table Setting • Table Conduct • Being Seated • Using of Napkins • General Behaviors • Handling Food • End of the Meal FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 3
  4. 4. Introduction 4
  5. 5. Introduction • Good manners are used to show consideration and respect for others. • Learning good manners will enable you to feel comfortable, more confident and relaxed in any situation. As with any skill, developing good table manners comes with practice. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 5
  6. 6. What is Etiquette? • Etiquette is respect, good manners, and good behavior. It is not just each of these things, but it is all of these things rolled into one. • Whether at home or in a restaurant, it is important to have a complete understanding of how to conduct yourself when entertaining or being entertained. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 6
  7. 7. Appearance and Hygiene 7
  8. 8. Appearance and Hygiene • Come to the table neat and clean. • Wash your hands before coming to the table for a meal. • Do not comb your hair or apply make-up at the dining table. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 8
  9. 9. Proper Dress Attire- Ladies Simple is best…….. best - Basic black or navy suit with white blouse. Dress (little black) or blouse with skirt (slacks are acceptable) - Jewelry (pearls)- No body jewelry (i.e. tongue rings, facial jewelry, etc.) - Panty Hose?? (skirt) – Knee highs?? (pants) - Well groomed: hair combed, nails clean, shoes clean, brush teeth, use deodorant . FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 9
  10. 10. Proper Dress Attire- Men best…….. Simple is best - Basic black or navy suit with white shirt and tie. (jacket, slacks with belt, and shirt with tie - acceptable) - Well groomed: hair combed, nails clean, shoes clean (no tennis shoes), brush teeth, use deodorant. - No earrings, body jewelry (tongue rings, facial rings, etc.) FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 10
  11. 11. Table Setting 11
  12. 12. Table Setting • Silverware will be arranged precisely in the right order that it is to be used for the meal. General LEFT rule -start with outer utensils and work your way toward the service = plate. FORK *Tip…..The word “left” has four letters, so does the word fork. The word “right” has five letters, so do the words knife & spoon. This RIGHT is a great way to remember that the fork is on your left and the = knife & spoon are on your right. KNIFE FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 12
  13. 13. Table Setting • Eat to your left, drink to your right. Any food dish to the left is yours, and any glass to the right is yours. • Starting with the knife, fork, or spoon that is farthest from your plate, work your way in, using one utensil for each course. • The salad fork is on your outermost left, followed by your dinner fork. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 13
  14. 14. Table Setting • Your soup spoon is on your outermost right, followed by your beverage spoon, salad knife and dinner knife. • Your dessert spoon and fork are above your plate or brought out with dessert. • If you remember the rule to work from the outside in, you'll be fine. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 14
  15. 15. Formal Table Setting FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 15
  16. 16. Formal Table Setting FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 16
  17. 17. • • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 17
  18. 18. Table Conduct 1. Being Seated 2. Using of Napkins 3. General Behaviors 4. Handling Food 5. End of the Meal 18
  19. 19. 1. Being Seated • Come to the table when the meal is ready. • Allow your elders to precede you. • Wait for all who are dining to arrive at the table then wait for a signal from the host or hostess to be seated. • People should seat themselves from the left side of the chair; assist those who need assistance in being seated. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 19
  20. 20. 2. Use of Napkins • Place the napkin in your lap as soon as you are seated. • Your napkin should be used to blot your mouth lightly and to wipe your fingers as necessary. • If you cough, sneeze, or need to blow your nose, use a tissue rather than the napkin. It is polite to leave the table if you have a long bout of coughing. • Excuse yourself and find the washroom if you need to blow your nose. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 20
  21. 21. 2. Use of Napkins • The napkin should remain in your lap throughout the meal. If you leave the table for any reason during the meal, place the napkin on the seat of your chair. At the end of the meal, leave the napkin to the left of your plate. It need not be refolded, but should be neat. • If you spill anything, use your napkin to mop up the spill. If the spill is large or very messy seek the assistance of you host. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 21
  22. 22. 2. Use of Napkins • Place your napkin on the CHAIR when temporarily leaving table. • Leave napkin in lap until everyone is finished. • Place napkin to LEFT of plate at end of meal. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 22
  23. 23. http://www.monkeysee.com/play/2251-basic-dining-etiquette-the-napkin FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 23
  24. 24. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 24
  25. 25. 3. General Behaviors • While waiting to be served, keep your hands in your lap. • Sit straight; do not slump. Elbows should be kept off the table until after the meal. While eating, keep your elbows near your sides. • Be polite. Contribute appropriately to the conversation so that the meal is a pleasant experience for all present. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 25
  26. 26. 4. Handling Food 26
  27. 27. European Set Menu 1. Bread and Butter 2. Soup 3. Salad 4. Entree 5. Dessert 6. Tea and Coffee FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 27
  28. 28. 1. • • ( ) • • • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 28
  29. 29. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 29
  30. 30. 2. • • • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 30
  31. 31. • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 31
  32. 32. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 32
  33. 33. 3. Salad • If ingredients in the salad are too large to eat, cut them with your fork, if possible, or cut the them one piece at a time with the dinner knife. • When you are finished eating the salad, position your cutlery across the salad plate, in the “five o’clock position”, with the tines of the fork placed downwards. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 33
  34. 34. Salad FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 34
  35. 35. Use one of two methods when using the fork and knife:: knife • American Style: Knife in right Style: hand, fork in left hand holding food. • After a few bite-sized pieces of food are cut, place knife on edge of plate with blades facing in. • Eat food by switching fork to right hand (unless you are left handed). • A left hand, arm or elbow on the table is bad manners. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 35
  36. 36. Use one of two methods when using the fork and knife:: knife • Continental/European Style: Knife in right Continental/ Style: hand, fork in left hand. • Eat food with fork still in left hand. • The difference is that you don't switch hands-you eat with your fork in your left hand, with the prongs curving downward. • Both utensils are kept in your hands with the tines pointed down throughout the entire eating process. • If you take a drink, you do not just put your knife down, you put both utensils down into the resting position: cross the fork over the knife. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 36
  37. 37. Main Course or Entree • Most North Americans eat the main course using what may be called the “zig-zag” method. • We cut our food then set the knife down on the edge of the plate. (Note that you should not set the knife on the table nor should you “bridge” the plate and table with the knife.) • We then transfer the fork to the dominant hand to eat. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 37
  38. 38. American Style Of Eating FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 38
  39. 39. American Style Finished Position FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbMRRj_cuoY 39
  40. 40. European Style of Dining • A more direct method, the “Continental style”, is used in European countries. The fork is held in the left hand and the knife in the right. • After cutting one bite of food, the food is transferred to the mouth with the fork still in the left hand, tines facing downward. • This eliminates the transferring of cutlery from hand to hand. • This method of eating is considered more formal than the zig-zag method. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 40
  41. 41. European Style of Dining • Cut large pieces of food into smaller ones, one bite at a time. It is considered impolite to cut all of your food at once. • Lift the food to your mouth; do not lean down to your plate to eat. • When taking a mouthful of food, eat all of the food off of the fork or spoon at one time. Do not take any of it out again. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 41
  42. 42. European Style of Dining FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 42
  43. 43. European Style Finished Position FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyuC950XCTI 43
  44. 44. • • • • • • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 44
  45. 45. • • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 45
  46. 46. • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 46
  47. 47. • .. • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 47
  48. 48. • • • • • • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 48
  49. 49. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 49
  50. 50. • * (Cheese) * * FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 50
  51. 51. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 51
  52. 52. • ( ) FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 52
  53. 53. • * * * FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 53
  54. 54. Serving and Being Served, a Few Pointers 54
  55. 55. Serving and Being Served, a Few Pointers Serving Order • At a formal restaurant or banquet, food should be presented to guests in the following order: guest of honor, female guests, male guests, hostess, host. After the guest of honor, first the women, then the men, are served in one of two ways: • (1) dishes can be presented to guests in the order of their seating, starting at the host's right; • (2) dishes may be presented in order of seniority, starting with the most influential and proceeding down to the least prominent guest. • Clearly, using the latter system requires the hosts to furnish information regarding the order of service ahead of time. In restaurants, most groups include neither guest of honor nor hosts, so the meals will simply be served first to the women, then to the men. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 55
  56. 56. Serving and Being Served, a Few Pointers From the Left • In general, the diner is approached from the left for three purposes: • (1) to present platters of food (from which the waiter will serve or the diner will help herself); • (2) to place side dishes such as vegetables or dinner rolls; • (3) to clear the side dishes that were placed from the left. The reason most often given for this is most people are right handed. So, for example, when a waiter must use his right hand to serve from a platter, it is least intrusive if he stands to the left. This way, the platter can be held safely away from the guest as the waiter leans forward (slightly) to reach her plate. And, in the case of placing side dishes, it makes most sense to put them to the side which is less in focus, leaving the right side free for the main dish. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 56
  57. 57. Serving and Being Served, a Few Pointers And from the Right • (1) These days it is nearly universal practice, even in very formal circumstances, for food to arrive already arranged on the plate (rather than to be presented on a platter). Preplated food (except for side dishes), as well as empty plates and clean utensils brought in preparation for upcoming courses, are always placed from the guest's right side. At the end of the course, these plates are also cleared from the right. . • (2) Wine (and all beverages) are presented and poured from the right. This is a logical approach, since glassware is set above and to the right of the guest's plate, and trying to pour from the left would force the server to reach in front of the diner. • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 57
  58. 58. Serving and Being Served, a Few Pointers Clearing Order • Just as the ideal of service is to present each course to the entire party at once, it is best to clear the plates at the same time, too. It has become common for waiters to remove plates as each guest finishes, in violation of this rule of serving etiquette, perhaps because it can be interpreted as extreme attentiveness on the part of the waiter. Nevertheless, the rule holds firm. The most elegant service facilitates the progress of a synchronized meal for the whole table. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 58
  59. 59. (Buffet) • • , , • • • • Buffet • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 59
  60. 60. • • • • • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 60
  61. 61. • • • • - • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 61
  62. 62. • • FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 62
  63. 63. Summary • The tradition of table etiquette in Western countries has evolved since the Middle • Ages in Europe. Writers have collected and published established customs but the customs • themselves have developed over time by common adoption. Etiquette differs greatly from culture to culture, and from occasion, time, and company. At its core, etiquette is based on being considerate of other people and ensuring pleasant social interactions. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 63
  64. 64. Summary • In a seated-service, white tablecloth operation, dining etiquette plays a much more important role then in the casual drop-in operation. Preservice etiquette includes taking reservations, providing a coat check, and allowing for seating preference. Once the guests are seated, servers must ask guests for a drink order, and announce specials and their prices. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 64
  65. 65. Summary • It is helpful when a server knows how one should eat a food and what proper manners are when eating. Servers must know how to help guests in various situations, including allergies, inedible foods, passing dishes, and when to eat. It is important for servers to know what is needed in service so people can enjoy eating in public without embarrassment. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 65
  66. 66. Summary • Utensils are always given precise placement on the table. Up to twelve pieces of flatware may be set. For flatware and glassware, the general rule of outer to inner should be used. It also helps for the server to know which supplementary utensils are needed for each of the specific items. When a guest is finished eating, the knife and fork can be placed on one side of the plate, facing the same direction, or placed in the middle of the plate, the rim of the plate acting as a frame. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 66
  67. 67. Summary • Some foods require special utensils, condiments, or sauces to be eaten correctly. At functions where there are no tables and quests stand to eat and drink small stands may be available for guests to place their beverages upon while eating. Napkins and small picks are often served with greasy foods, or foods that are hot, to make the foods easier to handle and to prevent soiling. If dips and sauces are served at parties, guests may dip the item only once. Y FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 67
  68. 68. Summary • Soups, vegetables, and seafood all require special methods or additional utensils when eating. Soups are served in either a bowl or a cup. The soup spoon is larger than other spoons and should be moved across the bowl away from the diner. Vegetables like corn on the cob can be held with both hands, or preferably with attached cob holders. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 68
  69. 69. Summary • Seafood can be very tricky to eat properly. Some fish must be boned, while crustaceans must be removed from their shells. Lemon, drawn butter, and cocktail sauce are often served with fish and shellfish. • At the close of the meal, the appropriate tip should be left for the server, and should be based on the total bill before tax. A tip between 15 to 20 percent is traditional, and if necessary, should be split to suit the service. In high-scale operations, it is typical to tip the captain and possibly the maitre d’. FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 69
  70. 70. Food and Beverage Service Method 1. Self-service • 1.1 Buffet service 9-10 2. Table Service • 2.1 French Service • ( ) File 2.2 Russian Service (M-learning) – 2.3 English Service 16 . . 52 2.4 American Service • 2.5 Banquet Service (10 )– 18 . . 52 FBM-341 Food and Beverage Management 70
  71. 71. Thank You 71

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