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Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
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Juglandaceae

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  1. Juglandaceae (Walnut family)
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  3. http:// dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID =18 <ul><li>bitternut hickory   Juglandaceae   Carya  cordiformis </li></ul><ul><li>Leaf:  Alternate, pinnately compound, 7 to 10 inches long, with 7 to 11 leaflets, leaflets are lanceolate and serrate, rachis is slender and pubescent, dark green above, paler below.  Flower:  Monoecious; males are yellow-green, drooping catkins with 3 hanging from one stalk, 3 to 4 inches long; females are short, 4-angled, on a terminal spike, appearing in spring.  Fruit:  Nearly globose but slightly flattened, 1 inch long, partially dehiscent from the middle to the sharp-pointed tip; husk is thin and 4-winged above the middle, often dusty-yellow looking; maturing in fall.  Twig:  Moderately stout to slender (when compared to other hickories), leaf scars are 3-lobed; terminal bud is valvate, 4-angled and sulfur-yellow to brown in color.  Bark:  Thin, tight and hard; initially smooth and silvery gray, much later gray with shallow furrows and interlacing ridges.  Form:  A medium to large tree capable of reaching over 100 feet tall with an open, rounded top.  </li></ul><ul><li>345E </li></ul><ul><li>Angiosperm </li></ul>
  4.  
  5. http:// dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID =19 <ul><li>pignut hickory   Juglandaceae   Carya  glabra </li></ul><ul><li>Leaf:  Alternate, pinnately compound, 8 to 12 inches long, with 5 (sometimes 7) leaflets, leaflets are lanceolate and serrate, rachis slender and glabrous, green above and paler below.  Flower:  Monoecious; males are yellow-green, drooping catkins, with three hanging from one stalk, 2 to 3 inches long; females are very short and found in clusters at the end of the branches, both appear in spring.  Fruit:  Obovoid to pear-shaped, 1 to 2 inches long, with a thin husk that only partially splits upon maturation; nut is not ribbed, fairly round but flattened, seed is somewhat bitter; ripening in early fall.  Twig:  Moderately stout to slender (when compared to the other hickories) and glabrous; leaf scars are 3-lobed to cordate - best described as a &quot;monkey face&quot;; terminal bud is small (1/4 inch), ovate and light brown in color.  Bark:  Initially smooth, and light gray, soon developing scaly ridges; the bark on older trees has obvious close interlacing shaggy-topped ridges.  Form:  A medium sized to large tree capable of reaching over 100 feet tall, with a rounded crown and a straight trunk.   </li></ul><ul><li>347E </li></ul><ul><li>Angiosperm </li></ul>
  6.  
  7. http:// dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID =198 <ul><li>pecan   Juglandaceae   Carya  illinoinensis </li></ul><ul><li>Leaf:  Alternate, pinnately compound with 9 to 15 finely serrate and often curved leaflets, 12 to 18 inches long.  Flower:  Monecious; male flowers in hanging, yellow-green catkins, often in pairs of three (4 to 5 inches long); females are small and yellowish green, 4-angled.  Fruit:  Large, oblong, brown, splotched with black, thin shelled nuts, 1 1/2 to 2 inches long, husks are thin, usually occur in clusters on trees, mature in fall.  Twig:  Moderately stout, light brown, fuzzy (particularly when young); leaf scars large and three lobed; buds are yellowish brown to brown, hairy, with terminal buds 1/4 to 1/2 inch long.  Bark:  Smooth when young, becoming narrowly fissured into thin broken strips, often scaly.  Form:  A large tree (can reach heights well over 100 feet) with spreading crown when in the open.     </li></ul><ul><li>348E </li></ul><ul><li>Angiosperm </li></ul>
  8.  
  9. http:// dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID =20 <ul><li>shagbark hickory   Juglandaceae   Carya  ovata   </li></ul><ul><li>Leaf:  Alternate, pinnately compound, 8 to 14 inches long with 5 (sometimes 7) leaflets, lateral leaflets are obovate to lanceolate, terminal leaflets are much larger than the laterals, margins serrate and ciliate, rachis stout and mostly glabrous; green above and paler below.  Flower:  Monoecious; male flowers are yellow-green catkins, hanging in 3's, 2 to 3 inches long; females are very short, in clusters at the end of branches, both appear spring.  Fruit:  Nearly round, 1 1/2 to 2 inches, with a very thick husk; nut is distinctly 4-ribbed, and the seed is sweet and delicious; maturing in fall.  Twig:  Stout and usually tomentose, but may be somewhat pubescent near terminal bud, numerous lighter lenticels; leaf scars are raised, 3-lobed to semicircular - best described as a &quot;monkey face&quot;; terminal bud is large, brown, and pubescent, covered with 3 to 4 brown scales, more elongated than other hickories.  Bark:  At first smooth and gray, later broken into long, wide plates attached at the middle, curving away from the trunk resulting in a coarsely shaggy appearance.  Form:  A tall tree reaching over 120 feet tall with a straight trunk and an open round to oblong crown. </li></ul><ul><li>352E </li></ul><ul><li>Angiosperm </li></ul>
  10.  
  11. http:// dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID =31 <ul><li>butternut   Juglandaceae   Juglans  cinerea </li></ul><ul><li>Leaf:  Alternate, pinnately compound, 15 to 25 inches long, with 11 to 17 oblong-lanceolate leaflets with serrate margins; rachis is stout and pubescent with a well developed terminal leaflet; green above and paler below.  Flower:  Monoecious; male flowers are single-stemmed, yellow-green catkins, 2 1/2 to 5 1/2 inches long; females are on a short spike near the end of the twig, green-yellow in color, appear in mid to late summer.  Fruit:  Oblong (lemon shaped), with a yellow-green sticky indehiscent husk; husk contains an irregularly-ribbed nut containing sweet, oily meat; mature in late summer.  Twig:  Stout, may be somewhat pubescent, yellow-brown to gray, with a chambered pith that is very dark brown in color; buds are large and covered with a few light colored pubescent scales; leaf scars are 3-lobed, resembling a &quot;monkey face&quot;; a tuft of pubescence is present above the leaf scar resembling an &quot;eyebrow&quot;.  Bark:  Light, ashy gray, with flat top, shiny ridges, developing diamond shaped patterns.  Form:  A small to medium sized tree up to 60 feet with a forked or crooked trunk and wide-spreading branches.  </li></ul><ul><li>356E </li></ul><ul><li>Angiosperm </li></ul>
  12.  
  13. http:// dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID =32 <ul><li>black walnut   Juglandaceae   Juglans  nigra </li></ul><ul><li>Leaf:  Alternate, pinnately compound, 12 to 24 inches long with 10 to 24 leaflets (poorly formed or missing terminal leaflet), leaflets are ovate-lanceolate, finely serrate, and 3 to 3 1/2 inches long, rachis is stout and somewhat pubescent; yellow-green to green above, slightly paler below.  Flower:  Monoecious; males are single-stemmed catkins, 2 1/2 to 5 1/2 inches long; females on short spikes near twig end, yellow-green in color, appearing in late spring.  Fruit:  Round, 2 to 2 1/2 inches across, with a thick, green indehiscent husk. The husk contains an irregularly furrowed, hard nut that contains sweet, oily meat (edible), mature in late summer to fall.  Twig:  Stout, light brown, with a buff-colored chambered pith; buds are tan, and large with a few pubescent scales; leaf scars are 3-lobed, resembling a &quot;monkey face&quot;.  Bark:  Brown on surface, darker brown when cut, ridged and furrowed with a rough diamond pattern.  Form:  A medium to large tree up to 100 feet in height that developes a straight, clear bole with a narrow crown under competition, twigs and branches quite stout.   </li></ul><ul><li>358E </li></ul><ul><li>Angiosperm </li></ul>

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