Locke

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Locke

  1. 1. Two Treatises of Government<br />John Locke<br />
  2. 2. Context<br />1673, Catholic Test Act attempts to prevent Charles from assuming thrown<br />Charles gains thrown, passes it to his brother, James II<br />James II has Presbyterians killed and removes members of Parliament<br />Appoints Roman Catholics to Public and Church Office<br />
  3. 3. Glorious Revolution<br />1688, Glorious Revolution, Parliament supports revolt against James II William of Orange invades Britain and Becomes William III.<br />Locke justifies this since, a government without the consent of the people can be overthrown.<br />
  4. 4. What is the Two Treatises?<br />Written by John Locke in 1690<br />Refutes arguments made my Robert Filmer<br />Outlines how a civil government should act<br />Justifies Glorious Revolution<br />
  5. 5. Filmer Vs Locke<br />
  6. 6. FilmerVs Locke<br />FILMER<br />God gives authority<br />Father passes authority to son<br />Kings have power to grant authority<br />LOCKE<br /><ul><li>God created people to be superior among other species, yet equal amongst themselves
  7. 7. God creates life, not father
  8. 8. Individuals can choose who they grant authority to </li></li></ul><li>Views on Government<br />Preservation of Property <br />“There remains still in the people a supreme power to remove or alter the legislative, when they find the legislative act contrary to the trust reposed in them.” (CH. XII)<br />People have the power to adjust or erase an unjust law.<br />Separate Branches of Government<br />
  9. 9. Executive Authority<br />“Secondly, the power of punishing he wholly gives up, and engages his natural force to assist the executive power of the society as the law thereof shall require.” (CH. IX)<br />Executive power (punishment) is public rather than private<br />“The supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent” (CH. X)<br />
  10. 10. State of Nature<br />Men are free to act “how they think fit, within the bounds of the law of nature, without asking leave, or depending upon the will of any other man.” (CH. II)<br />HOWEVER, a man voids these laws of nature when he joins private, particular political society. (CH. IX) <br />
  11. 11. Works Cited<br />Armitage, David John Locke, Carolina, and the "Two Treatises of Government" Political   Theory. Vol. 32, No. 5 (Oct., 2004), pp. 602-627. Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.:      http://www.jstor.org/stable/4148117           <br />McDowall, David. An Illustrated History of Britain and Ireland. Longman Group UK Limited.    2006. Harlow, England<br />Tradition and Prudence in Locke's Exceptions to TolerationDavid J. LorenzoAmerican Journal of Political ScienceVol. 47, No. 2 (Apr., 2003), pp. 248-258Published by: Midwest Political Science AssociationArticle Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3186136<br />Jimmy Casa Klausen. The Journal of Politics Vol. 69, No. 3 (Aug. 2007) pp. 760-769. Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Southern Political Science Association http://www.jstor.org/stable/4622578<br />

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