The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader
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A localised study about the average daily monetary expenditures of a 7th grader in Dr. Yanga's Colleges Inc. (a private school in Bocaue Bulacan Philippines 3018). ...

A localised study about the average daily monetary expenditures of a 7th grader in Dr. Yanga's Colleges Inc. (a private school in Bocaue Bulacan Philippines 3018).

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  • 1. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader Azarcon Jhonnel Blas Julie Anne Delit Hazzel Mendoza Katrine Quinto John Elmer Salvador Angelo BSBA 2-C
  • 2. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 1 We dedicate this study to our friends, our family, our school, and our country. —The researchers
  • 3. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 2 The contents. The contents. page 2 Chapter 1. Introduction. page 3 1.1. The study. page 3 1.2. The problem. page 3 1.3. Significance. page 4 1.4. Scope and limitation. page 4 1.5. The concept and hypothesis. page 5 1.6. The terms. page 5 Chapter 2. Literature and studies. page 7 Chapter 3. Methodology. page 10 Chapter 4. The data. page 13 Chapter 5. Conclusions. page 20 External links. page 21
  • 4. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 3 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION. 1.1. The study. This study is committed to bring a very essential idea and balanced information: the average daily expenditures of a Dr. Yanga's Colleges Inc. (DYCI) 7th grade school student and the factors behind it. The researchers choose the 7th graders of DYCI as the target respondents. The researchers treat the population as students who are new to the environment of a junior high school more particularly of DYCI. It limits the school's grade school students by not allowing them to go out from the school premises during class breaks (lunch and snack times) and when they need to buy materials for their activities, projects, etc. DYCI however offers the products that are needed by their students right inside the campus. There are stores that offer food, school materials, etc. that are needed to fulfil the students' requirements and attendance inside the school. The researchers treat these limitations and the population's level of education as big factors on how they spend their daily allowance. Daily expenditures are something that is inevitable. People can never actually avoid spending their money throughout the day especially those whose life is about productivity (students, workers, employees, etc.). However it is not important to just accept that people are spending money every day of their lives. They need to know how they spend their daily allowance and the reasons and factors that affect the ways they spend it, their limitations when it comes to budgeting and so their responsibilities to manage the factors that require them to spend their daily allowance. People consume every day because it is a vital part of their lives but they also often neglect how and why they consume. Limited by resources and opportunities, the researchers try to determine at least the very basic of a person's way of consuming. The researchers treat the 7th graders as not merely the respondents for this study but also a prototype about how the general students of DYCI spend their daily allowance. The information of this study can surely and eventually help future marketing plans, studies of the same nature, etc. 1.2. The problem. How the general people spend their daily allowance is something that cannot be determined easily. The researchers however try to give a simple insight about it. The insight shall be rational and reasonable in every way so the researchers are challenged into using the DYCI 7th graders as their model.
  • 5. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 4 This study aims to provide answers to the questions below. 1. What are the common expenditures that a DYCI 7th grader put their daily allowances into? 2. Why does a DYCI 7th grader arrive at this average set of expenditures? 3. How much is the average daily allowance of DYCI 7th graders? 4. What are the percentages of these average daily expenditures of a DYCI 7th grader? 5. What are the percentages of these further daily expenditures of a DYCI 7th grader? 6. How much does a DYCI 7th grader averagely spend in every expenditure in accord to the percentages? 7. If ever there is a part of the daily allowance that is uncategorised, where can the DYCI 7th grader spend it? 1.3. Significance. The importance of this study is not only focussed to the readers. The common readers can understand the basic ways of how a DYCI 7th grader spends his daily allowance but this study is more about it. This study can help the guardians of the students to recognise, analyse and evaluate their students' daily expenditures then they can eventually manage it well in accord to the real insights of the statistics about how their students will spend it throughout the day. This study can also help businesspersons to deal with their marketing plans by letting them know at least a substantiated idea why such business promote such sales, market shares, etc. This study can help the locale (DYCI) to better understand their students' idea of spending their daily allowance then they can modify their stores well (e.g., add another store that offers such products, remove a store that offers not useful products, etc.) inside the campus. 1.4. Scope and limitation. This study is limited in such ways that the researchers do not include grades of DYCI's Basic Education Department but 7th . The researchers perform the survey randomly and blinded about the population's age, section, and way of living. The researchers do not include 7th graders from other schools. The researchers also do not include in the survey the DYCI 7th graders who are unfortunately unavailable during the time that they distributed the survey questionnaires.
  • 6. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 5 1.5. The concept and hypothesis. To simplify and rationalise the study, the researchers plan about how to make the allocation of daily allowance systematic. The researchers think of themselves as the 7th graders of DYCI. They eventually find out that a DYCI 7th grader’s daily allowance can be broken down into simpler categories. It is shown by the figure below. (No breakdown) Average daily allowance (First breakdown) Spent money Uncategorised money (Second breakdown) Expenditures Savings Uncategorised money (Third breakdown) Food Transportation Social Savings Uncategorised money (Fourth breakdown) Meal Drinks Snack Tricycle Jeep Gaming Social networks Cellphone load Sagip- Aral Savings Uncategorised money Figure 1. The breakdown of average daily allowance into different expenditure categories. 1.6. The terms. For the better understanding of this study by its readers, the researchers include below terms that are defined connotatively. 1. 7th grader, a student that is taking the 7th grade of basic education within the academic year this study is conducted. 2. accessories, the unnecessary materials added into other things (e.g., bracelets for the forearms, key chains for the mobile phones, etc.) which absence will never affect any required thing. 3. average, the typified values of a set whether of currency, percentage, or whole number. 4. cellphone load, the prepaid credits in a mobile network account to subscribe into network services like text messaging or voice calls. 5. daily allowance, the money that are given to a person regularly every school day; it is the money being allowed to be spent within 24 hours of a school day (if it is given every week or every month, etc., it must be divided into the number of school days within the range of time, from and to another giving of allowance). 6. Dr. Yanga's Colleges Inc. (DYCI), the study locale; a school located along McArthur Highway Bocaue Bulacan 3018, it offers courses for basic and secondary education; it is a school that limits the exit of the grade school students by not letting them go out from
  • 7. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 6 the school campus during their lunch and snack times and even when the students need to buy something from the available stores outside. 7. drinks, the general beverages like orange juice, mineralised water, etc. 8. expenditure, the money that are deducted from the daily allowance and includes the money that goes to food, transportation and social expenditures. 9. gaming, the time when a student diverts himself by playing games (online games, Facebook games, etc.) on a desktop or laptop computer and may charge him for the rent. 10. hangout, a social time that are made by students for leisure. 11. jeep, tricycle, the public utility vehicles that route along McArthur Highway and the vicinity to make attendance of DYCI students possible. 12. meal, the lunch time allotted by DYCI to its grade school students. 13. Sagip-Aral, a scholarship program of DYCI where selected students become scholars through the daily contribution of all the students. 14. school supplies, the materials that are purchased by the students to fulfil their scholarly necessities. 15. snack, the time when a student need a hurried or light meal; a break allotted by DYCI to the grade school students, once every morning and once every afternoon. 16. social networks, the time when a student diverts himself by going online (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, etc.) and interacting with persons virtually on a desktop or laptop computer and may charge him for the rent. 17. social, the characteristic of needing to socialise and being interactive to people. 18. spent money, the money that goes to expenditures and savings. 19. transportation, the way or process to go to school either by walking, riding on a private vehicle, riding on a public utility vehicle (jeep or tricycle). 20. uncategorised money, the money that goes from the daily allowances to unknown nature of expenditures.
  • 8. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 7 CHAPTER 2. LITERATURE AND STUDIES. On 6 June 2010, ABS-CBN aired this news on the television and posted it as an article onto their website. Students struggle to stretch school allowance MANILA, Philippines - Schools are reopening this week, and for thousands of college students, part of the hurdle is how to stretch their daily allowance. Karen Tan, a fourth year psychology student at the Universidad de Manila, a public university in Manila has to contend with an Php 80.00 daily allowance, which more often than not, she doesn't get in full. "Life is hard, I often have to give her less than P80," said Karen's mother, Myrna Tan. Karen said she has no choice but to come up with ways to extend her limited allowance. She spends P18 for her transport fare and a student budget meal in her school costs P28 without soft drinks, just plain tap water. The remaining P33 is spent either on Xeroxing assignments required in school, or on the Internet to do research work. This takes up a lot of her allowance, and almost always, very little, if at all, is left of Karen's less than P80 a day stipend. Karen said that she needs to help her mother and so, she has taken a part-time job in a fast food chain. "With this job, I don't have to ask allowance from my parents." Another major expenditure for students is housing. Eight students packed in a room are charged a bedspace of Php 1 500 a month. Amor Espinosa, an owner of a boarding house said the charge is typical of dormitories, and they have to inform residents ahead of time if they plan to raise the rent. "Often, payment of students are delayed," said Amor.
  • 9. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 8 On 23 April 2013, Macau Daily Times published this article and posted it onto their website. Maximum limit of student allowances up 22 per cent The government announced, in its Official Gazette yesterday, that allowances for students, covering meals, stationery, loans and scholarships, will be increased. The ceiling limit of qualified households will also be increasing between 12 and 22 per cent. A nuclear family with an income that is less than MOP 10 960 qualifies for the allowance. The new income limit is 19 per cent more than the present amount. The ceiling limit for a household with four members has also been increased by 17.5 per cent, to a monthly income MOP 13 320. Preschool children, primary school pupils and middle school students will enjoy a MOP 200 increase for both meal allowance and stationery allowance. Meal allowance will be adjusted to MOP 2 600, and the stationery allowance to MOP 1 700 for preschool children and MOP 2 200 for middle schools pupils. In addition, subsidies for student loans, as well as scholarships, will be increased from MOP 200 to MOP 500, pursuant to the different regions where the individual applicant prefers to study. For those who study in Hong Kong and abroad, there will be an increase from MOP 500 to MOP 5 000 per month. As for those going to Taiwan or staying in Macau, the allowance will be adjusted to MOP 3 300 and 3 100 respectively, MOP 300 more in each case. Students who peruse undergraduate study on the mainland can have the monthly loan or scholarship of MOP 2 200, a MOP 200 increase. The accommodation limit will be raised from the current MOP 1 800 to MOP 2 000 each month. These adjustments will be effective from the new school year of 2013 or 2014. Going to college is an expensive venture. While tuition costs are clearly printed on schools' websites and in catalogues, the amount of spending money a college student needs may be difficult to determine. Pinning down an amount of money needed for college depends on many factors, including what one considers spending money, activities, and the geographical region where the student attends college. One of the reasons it is difficult to determine how much your college student may need is that different people consider different things as paid for with "spending money." For example, some people have already factored the costs of textbooks and parking on campus into the cost of attending school. Loans are based on this yearly required amount. However, many parents consider things like books to be something that a student buys during their college career, requiring spending money.
  • 10. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 9 Textbooks are extremely expensive (costing anywhere from $200 to $700 per semester), and they are required. Parking on campus is another hidden cost of college, which can be a small expenditure of $100 for the school year, or a much larger one. While some may not see a car as a necessity, college students may think otherwise. In order to calculate spending money accurately, you first have to agree on what purchases fall into the category of spending money, and what is simply a cost of attending college. The following items may be deemed spending money for college students: 1. Clothing 2. Entertainment 3. Food (eating out, ordering pizza, coffee to go, which may not be included in the food budget for the year) 4. Gas or public transportation 5. Cell phone 6. Activities such as soccer club, a dance class, or gym membership 7. Gifts 8. Textbooks and school supplies 9. Electronics (including a computer) 10. Travel allowance (to come home for Thanksgiving, etc.) Some items vary widely. For example, if a travel allowance is included and the student goes to school quite far from home, coming home could cost $500 to $1,000 per trip. Deciding whether to include such expenditures in spending money totals is important. Once you decide which items to include, you must estimate how much money to allow for each. While some college students need a sizable clothing allowance each month, other students do some shopping in the summer and head to school with their wardrobe ready for the year. Likewise, some students participate in expensive activities while others do not. While both types of students will need a considerable amount of money to spend, calculating a total depends on the types of activities in which they participate. Finally, the geographic region can heavily affect the amount of spending money a college student needs. Necessities like rent and groceries are more expensive in big cities, but students on rural campuses will spend more on gas or public transportation than those living in the city. Before sending your teen off to college, it is important to discuss the financial aspects of their campus lives. For most, this is the first time they have been on their own and had to plan their budget. A student with poor budget awareness may run out of money necessary to buy books, pay tuition, or for other important expenditures of living. Likewise, many college students may be working with credit or debit cards for the first time in their lives, and without proper guidance, they may exhibit poor spending control and tracking. While this may merely be a
  • 11. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 10 bump in the road for some students, for others it may mean the difference between being able to attend college and not. The best way to prepare your college student for a successful financial experience is to start early. Stress savings from an early age, and encourage children to track spending. In high school, consider giving your child a teen account to manage himself so they know how to handle money when they go away to college. By laying the foundation early, you can set your teen up to succeed when they are finally on their own.
  • 12. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 11 CHAPTER 3. METHODOLOGY. The researchers gather data from all the sections of 7th grade in DYCI. 60 survey questionnaires are distributed to them. However, the researchers decide to take only 50 answered survey questionnaires. These are the questionnaires that are qualified to be used for tallying. 10 survey questionnaires are not qualified for some reasons (e.g., demographics cannot be determined because of lacking data like age, sex, etc., distribution of daily expenditures is greater than the daily allowance indicated, etc.). The survey questionnaire is designed into three parts. The beginning section is for the demographics which asks the students about their age, sex and daily allowance. The final section is divided into two parts. Part 1 requires the students to allocate and distribute their daily allowance into different expenditure categories by first checking the checkbox and indicating the amount they spend for it. Part 2 is the part where they will answer multiple-choice questions that are all about the irregular expenditures (not happening daily) but are taken from the daily allowance (e.g., hangouts, monetary contributions, etc.). The first part therefore is the definite part of the survey while the second part is the indefinite. The data gathered are presented in Chapter 4 and are hopefully giving answers in Chapter 5 that are solving the problems stated in Chapter 1. Moreover, the findings presented in Chapter 5 are helped by the related literature and studies. The students of BSBA 2-C would like to gather information from you as they would study the Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader. Name (optional): ____________________________ Age: _____ Section: ________________ Sex: a. Male b. Female Daily allowance: Php ________ Part 1. How do you spend your daily allowance? (Please check the checkbox before the category before you indicate the amount you spend for it.) Food [ ] Drinks Php ________________/day [ ] Meal Php ________________/day [ ] Snack Php ________________/day Transportation [ ] Tricycle Php ________________/day [ ] Jeep Php ________________/day Social
  • 13. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 12 [ ] Gaming Php ________________/day [ ] Social networks Php ________________/day [ ] Cellphone load Php ________________/day [ ] Sagip-Aral Php ________________/day Savings Php ________________/day Part 2. Do you spend your daily allowance in… 1. Monetary contributions (e.g., projects, activities, etc.)? [ ] Yes [ ] No 2. Hangouts after classes? [ ] Always [ ] Sometimes [ ] Never 3. Accessories (e.g., key chains, bracelets, etc.)? [ ] Yes [ ] No 4. School supplies? [ ] Yes [ ] No Thank you for letting us know these essential information. This will truly help us in our study. Figure 2. The survey form.
  • 14. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 13 CHAPTER 4. THE DATA. The following charts and tables are the presentations of the data gathered by the researchers from the respondents through the survey questionnaires. Gender Frequency Percentage Male 25 50% Female 25 50% Table 1. Sex differences of the respondents. Age Frequency Percentage 11-year old 8 16% 12-year old 31 62% 13-year old 11 22% Table 2. Age differences of the respondents. Frequency Percentage Respondents spending daily allowance for monetary contributions (e.g., projects, activities, etc.) 40 80% Respondents spending daily allowance for hangouts 24 48% a Always 1 2% b Sometimes 23 46% Respondents spending daily allowance for accessories (e.g., key chains, bracelets, etc.) 6 12% Respondents spending daily allowance for school supplies 41 82% Table 3. Other expenditures of the respondents. Half of the surveyed respondents (50%) are male and the other half are female. See Table 1. Most of the surveyed respondents are 12-year old though 16% (8 respondents) of them are 11-year old and 22% (11 respondents) are 13-year old. See Table 2. The irregular expenditures of the respondents that they take from their daily allowance are the following: monetary contributions (80%, 40 respondents), hangouts (48%, 24 respondents), accessories (12%, 6 respondents) and school supplies (82%, 41 respondents). See Table 3.
  • 15. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 14 A DYCI 7th grader averagely spends 85.9% of his daily allowance. The remaining 14.1% is uncategorised or spent for other unknown purposes (see Chart 1). The chart shows that a DYCI 7th grader can actually spend as much as 85.9% for the expenditures he already knows. These expenditures are food, transportation and social expenditures. The uncategorised money comprises 14.1% of his daily allowance. This portion includes all the expenditures that are not regularly happening yet are taken from the daily allowance. This can be spent into hangouts, accessories, school supplies, etc. See Chart 1. Chart . Distribution of spent and uncategorised money in the average daily allowance.
  • 16. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 15 A DYCI 7th grader averagely spends 37.3% of his daily allowance for his food, 19.0% for his transportation, 15.1% for his social expenditures, 14.5% goes to his savings and the remaining 14.1% is uncategorised or spent for other unknown purposes. See Chart 2. Chart 2. Distribution of different expenditure categories and uncategorised money in the average daily allowance.
  • 17. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 16 A DYCI 7th grader averagely spends Php 31.42 for his food. It is 37.3% of his daily allowance. The average daily food expenditures can further be divided into three categories. These categories are drinks (26.1%), meal (29.8%) and snack (44.1%). See Chart 3. He averagely spends Php 16.00 for his transportation. It is 19.0% of his daily allowance. The average daily transportation expenditures can further be divided into two categories. These categories are tricycle (40.4%) and jeep (59.6%). See Chart 4. Chart 3. Distribution of further categories in the average daily food expenditures. Chart 4. Distribution of further categories in the average daily transportation expenditures.
  • 18. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 17 A DYCI 7th grader averagely spends Php 12.75 for his social expenditures. It is 15.1% of his daily allowance. The average daily social expenditures can further be divided into four categories. These categories are social networks (4.9%), cellphone load (22.7%), gaming (3.1%) and Sagip-Aral (69.3%). Table 4 shows all the gathered values in the average daily basis. The biggest percentage among the large expenditure categories goes to food (37.29%) followed by transportation (18.99%) and social (15.13%). Amount Percentage to the daily allowance Percentage to the category Daily allowance Php 84.26 100.00% Spent money Php 72.37 85.89% Uncategorised money Php 11.89 14.11% 100.00% Food Php 31.42 37.29% 100.00% 1 Drinks Php 8.20 9.73% 26.10% 2 Meal Php 9.36 11.11% 29.79% 3 Snacks Php 13.86 16.45% 44.11% Transportation Php 16.00 18.99% 100.00% 1 Tricycle Php 6.46 7.67% 40.38% 2 Jeep Php 9.54 11.32% 59.63% Social Php 12.75 15.13% 100.00% 1 Gaming Php 0.40 0.47% 3.14% 2 Social networks Php 0.62 0.74% 4.86% 3 Cellphone load Php 2.90 3.44% 22.75% 4 Sagip-Aral Php 8.83 10.48% 69.25% Savings Php 12.20 14.48% 100.00% Table 4. The average daily values in accord to the data gathered. Chart 5. Distribution of further categories in the average daily social expenditures.
  • 19. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 18 Chart 6 shows the distribution of all further expenditure categories, savings and uncategorised money in the average daily allowance. The biggest percentage among the small expenditure categories goes to snack (16.4%) followed by savings (14.5%), jeep (11.3%), meal (11.1%), Sagip-Aral (10.5%), drinks (9.7%), tricycle (7.7%), cellphone load (3.4%), social networks (0.7%) and gaming (0.5%). Chart 6. Distribution of further expenditure categories, savings and uncategorised money in the average daily allowance.
  • 20. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 19 Range 130 Class size 7 Class interval 19 Class interval Frequency (f) Midpoint (x) f(x) Class boundary cf< 20~38 3 29 87 19.5~38.5 3 39~57 8 48 384 38.5~57.5 11 58~76 9 67 603 57.5~76.5 20 77~95 5 86 430 76.5~95.5 25 96~114 19 105 1995 95.5~114.5 44 115~133 4 124 496 114.5~133.5 48 134~152 2 143 286 133.5~152.5 50 Total 50 602 4281 Mean Php 85.62 Median Php 95.5 Mode Php 104.62 Table 5. Statistical treatment of the respondents' daily allowance. Table 5 presents the statistical treatment of the data gathered by the researchers. However, the researchers use the simple arithmetic average for the average daily allowance presented by the early charts and tables.
  • 21. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 20 CHAPTER 5. CONCLUSIONS. The researchers try to put together the related literature and studies, and the data gathered to come up into great findings and so, the researchers learn facts that can be carried onto future researches of the same nature, financial accounting, marketing plans, etc. The common expenditures that a DYCI 7th grader put their daily allowance into are the following: food, transportation, social and savings. These are the categories of expenditures that can be further divided into the following categories: meal, drinks, snack, tricycle, jeep, gaming, social networks, cellphone load, Sagip-Aral and savings. Students in DYCI do not have the permission to leave the school just for eating snack or lunch. Students have two snack times, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. This is a good reason why they spend more money for snacks than the money they spend for meal. Some respondents did not allocate any money from their daily allowance for lunch. This is a very obvious case that these students pack their lunch at homes and consume it inside the school during meal. In most cases, the grade school students of DYCI are located near the school itself. It is a good reason why they prefer public transportation instead of private one. However, the survey results tallied that some students do not spend money for their transportation at all. It may be because their parents applied their students into the service-type of transportation. These are jeeps or tricycles that bring the students daily from their home to the school, vice versa, in return of monthly or weekly payment by the parents. Sagip-Aral is the priority social expenditure of the DYCI 7th grader. The school has provided rules that no student are allowed to go to internet cafés that are near the school campus. This is a very good reason for students to not prioritise gaming and social networks. See Table 4, Chapter 4. The uncategorised money is the portion of the daily allowance that are spent into unknown purposes or natures. The researchers tallied the daily allowance and find out that the spent money rarely equalise with the daily allowance. Therefore, there are really some unknown cases where the money shall be spent. This uncategorised money however can be irregular expenditures that are taken from the daily allowance but do not happen daily or categories that are not included into the breakdown concept of the researchers. The researchers learn that this can be spent into monetary contributions for the DYCI 7th graders’ projects, activities, etc., accessories, school supplies, or hangouts. Budgeting has never been a simple task people do every day. People just simplify it by negligence. People ignore budgeting and allocation of allowance thinking that they are not supposed to be as responsible for their money. At the end of the day, the allowance and expenditure models of DYCI 7th grader is realised to gradually change over time. Therefore, future researches can be done and specify the rate of changes into the allowance nature over a given period of time.
  • 22. The Average Daily Expenditures of a DYCI 7th Grader | 21 External links. http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/nation/06/06/10/students-struggle-stretch-school-allowance-0 http://www.macaudailytimes.com.mo/macau/43199-maximum-limit-of-student-allowances-up- 22-pct.html http://college.lovetoknow.com/Amount_of_Spending_Money_a_College_Student_Needs