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Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation
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Ch. 5, sec.2,3 Climate and Vegetation

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Transcript

  • 1. Climate and Vegetation
    Chapter 5, Section 2
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • 4. Colder Climates
    Arctic Coastline = tundra
    Cold, treeless plain
    Long, super cold winters; summers brief and chilly (high 40˚ F)
    Most of the rest of Canada and Alaska = subarctic
    Very cold winters; mild summers
    Some areas have permafrost = permanently frozen ground
    Rocky Mountain and Pacific Ranges = highland
    • Temperature and vegetation vary based on elevation
  • Moderate Climates
    North Central and NE U.S. and Southern Canada = humid continental
    Cold winters; warm summers
    Productive agriculture region
    Northern California to Southern Alaska = Marine West Coast
    Winters long and mild; summers moderately warm
  • 5. Milder Climates
    Most Southern states = humid subtropical
    Summers hot and muggy; winters mild and cool
    Moist air from GOM bring rain in winter
    Long growing season for crops
    Central and Southern California = Mediterranean
    Summers dry, sunny and warm; winters mild and rainy
  • 6.
  • 7. Dry Climates
    Great Plains and Northern Great Basin = semiarid
    15” of rain annually
    Only short grasses and shrubs grow
    Southwestern states = desert
    Hot and dry; < 10” of rain annually
  • 8.
  • 9. Tropical Climate
    Hawaii = Tropical Wet
    Supports lush rainforests
    Temperature varies only a few degrees in the 70s
    Rains almost every day
    South Florida = Tropical Wet and Dry
    Nearly always warm with a wet and dry season
    Everglades = swampland covering 4000 sq. miles
  • 10.
    • The US has more climate zones than Canada.
    • 11. Reason: US extends over such a large area North to South.
    • 12. Remember: Alaska & Hawaii
  • 13. Human-Environment Interaction
    Chapter 5, Section 3
  • 14. First Settlers
    First inhabitants were nomads who crossed over Beringia from Asia
    Mostly hunters and gatherers that moved around the country
    About 3000 years ago, people began relying more on agriculture for food, and created permanent settlements to live in
  • 15.
  • 16. Building Cities
    Where a city is built and develops depends on the physical setting
    Water
    Landscape
    Climate
    Weather
    Availability of natural resources
  • 17. Trails and Inland Waterways
    created trails that led inland as cities started moving away from the coast
    National and Wilderness roads
    Santa Fe and Oregon Trails
    Used existing waterways and created connections
    St. Lawrence Seaway – connects Great Lakes to St. Lawrence R. using a series of locks
  • 18. Transcontinental Railroad
    Began in the early 19th century (1800s)
    Had to work around natural barriers
    Completed in 1869 (US) and 1885 (Canada)
    Helped promote westward expansion
  • 19. Highway System
    Spurred by the development of the automobile in the early 1900s
    US = 4 million miles of road
    46,000 miles crisscross the country
    Runs north to south and east to west
    Canada = 560,000 miles of road
    Mostly runs east to west

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