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AP Chemistry Chapter 18 Sample Exercises
AP Chemistry Chapter 18 Sample Exercises
AP Chemistry Chapter 18 Sample Exercises
AP Chemistry Chapter 18 Sample Exercises
AP Chemistry Chapter 18 Sample Exercises
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AP Chemistry Chapter 18 Sample Exercises

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  • 1. Sample Exercise 18.1 Calculating the Concentration of Water in Air What is the concentration, in parts per million, of water vapor in a sample of air if the partial pressure of the water is 0.80 torr and the total pressure of the air is 735 torr? The concentration of CO in a sample of air is found to be 4.3 ppm. What is the partial pressure of the CO if the total air pressure is 695 torr? Answer: 3.0 × 10 -3 torr Practice Exercise Solution Analyze: We are given the partial pressure of water vapor and the total pressure of an air sample and asked to determine the water vapor concentration. Plan: Recall that the partial pressure of a component in a mixture of gases is given by the product of its mole fraction and the total pressure of the mixture (Section 10.6): Solve: Solving for the mole fraction of water vapor in the mixture, , gives: The concentration in ppm is the mole fraction times 10 6
  • 2. Sample Exercise 18.2 Calculating the Wavelength Required to Break a Bond What is the maximum wavelength of light, in nanometers, that has enough energy per photon to dissociate the O 2 molecule? Solution Solve: The dissociation energy of O 2 is 495 kJ/mol. Using this value and Avogadro’s number, we can calculate the amount of energy needed to break the bond in a single O 2 molecule: We next use the Planck relationship, E = hv , (Equation 6.2) to calculate the frequency, v of a photon that has this amount of energy: Finally, we use the relationship between the frequency and wavelength of light (Section 6.1) to calculate the wavelength of the light:
  • 3. Sample Exercise 18.2 Calculating the Wavelength Required to Break a Bond The bond energy in N 2 is 941 kJ/mol (Table 8.4). What is the longest wavelength a photon can have and still have sufficient energy to dissociate N 2 ? Answer: 127 nm Practice Exercise Solution Thus, light of wavelength 242 nm, which is in the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum, has sufficient energy per photon to photodissociate an O 2 molecule. Because photon energy increases as wavelength decreases , any photon of wavelength shorter than 242 nm will have sufficient energy to dissociate O 2 .
  • 4. Sample Interactive Exercise Putting Concepts Together Mixtures (a) Acids from acid rain or other sources are no threat to lakes in areas where the rock is limestone (calcium carbonate), which can neutralize the excess acid. Where the rock is granite, however, no such neutralization occurs. How does the limestone neutralize the acid? (b) Acidic water can be treated with basic substances to increase the pH, although such a procedure is usually only a temporary cure. Calculate the minimum mass of lime, CaO, needed to adjust the pH of a small lake ( V = 4 × 10 9 L) from 5.0 to 6.5. Why might more lime be needed? Solution Analyze: We need to remember what a neutralization reaction is, and calculate the amount of a substance needed to effect a certain change in pH. Plan: For (a), we need to think about how acid can react with calcium carbonate, which evidently does not happen with acid and granite. For (b), we need to think about what reaction would happen with acid and CaO and do stoichiometric calculations. From the proposed change in pH, we can calculate the change in proton concentration needed and then figure out how much CaO it would take to do the reaction Solve: (a) The carbonate ion, which is the anion of a weak acid, is basic. (Sections 16.2 and 16.7) Thus, the carbonate ion, CO 3 2– , reacts with H + ( aq ) . If the concentration of H + ( aq ) is small, the major product is the bicarbonate ion, HCO 3 – . If the concentration Of H + ( aq ) is higher, however, H 2 CO 3 forms and decomposes to CO 2 and H 2 O. (Section 4.3) b) The initial and final concentrations of H + ( aq ) in the lake are obtained from their pH values: Using the volume of the lake, we can calculate the number of moles of H + ( aq ) at both pH values:
  • 5. Sample Interactive Exercise Putting Concepts Together Mixtures Solution (Continued) Hence, the change in the amount of H+( aq ) is 4 × 10 4 mol – 1 × 10 3 mol ≈ 4 × 10 4 mol Let’s assume that all the acid in the lake is completely ionized, so that only the free H + ( aq ) measured by the pH needs to be neutralized. We will need to neutralize at least that much acid, although there may be a great deal more acid in the lake than that The oxide ion of CaO is very basic. (Section 16.5) In the neutralization reaction 1 mol of O 2– reacts with 2 mol of H + to form H 2 O. Thus, 4 × 10 4 mol of H + requires the following number of grams of CaO: This amounts to slightly more than a ton of CaO. That would not be very costly because CaO is an inexpensive base, selling for less than $100 per ton when purchased in large quantities. The amount of CaO calculated above, however, is the very minimum amount needed because there are likely to be weak acids in the water that must also be neutralized. This liming procedure has been used to adjust the pH of some small lakes to bring their pH into the range necessary for fish to live. The lake in our example would be about a half mile long, a half mile wide, and have an average depth of 20 ft.

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