Ch. Nine Industrial Revolution
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Ch. Nine Industrial Revolution

on

  • 7,637 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
7,637
Views on SlideShare
7,624
Embed Views
13

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
34
Comments
1

1 Embed 13

http://www.slideshare.net 13

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • best powerpoint ever!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! had all the answers to my homework packet sooooo...thank you!!!:)
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Ch. Nine Industrial Revolution Ch. Nine Industrial Revolution Presentation Transcript

  • THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION CHAPTER NINE
  • THE BEGINNINGS OF INDUSTRIALIZATION
  • AGRICULTURAL REVOLUTION
    • INCREASED FOOD SUPPIES LED TO AN INCREASE IN POPULATION THAT BOOSTED DEMAND FOR MANUFACTURED GOODS AND PROVIDED LABOR FOR FACTORIES
  • ABUNDANT NATURAL RESOURCES
    • BRITAIN HAD THE NATURAL RESOURCES NEEDED FOR INDUSTRIALIZATION: WATER POWER, COAL, IRON ORE, RIVERS AND HARBORS.
  • POLITICAL STABILITY
    • ENABLED BRITAIN TO DEVOTE ITS ENERGIRES AND RESOURCES TO ECONOMIC EXPANSION, INDUSTRIALIZATION, AND OVERSEAS TRADE CREATED A CLIMATE FOR PROGRESS.
  • FACTORS OF PRODUCTION
    • BRITAIN HAD ALL THE RESOURCES NEEDED TO PRODUCE GOODS AND SERVICES, INCLUDING LAND, LABOR, AND CAPITAL.
  • TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY
    • IMPROVED THE QUALITY AND SPEED OF COTTON CLOTH PRODUCTION; BOOSTED PROFITS; SPURRED OTHER INDUSTRIAL IMPROVEMENTS
  • ENTREPRENEURS
    • PROVIDED ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT SKILLS AND TOOK FINANCIAL RISKS OF DEVELOPING NEW BUSINESSES
  • BUILDING OF FACTORIES
    • ALLOWED INDUSTRY TO MOVE OUT OF THE HOME AND INTO A CENTRAL LOCATION
  • RAILROAD BOOM
    • PROVIDED AN INEXPENSIVE WAY TO TRANSPORT RAW MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS; CREATED NEW JOBS
  • TERMS
    • ENCLOSURE: WERE LARGE FIELDS THAT WERE FENCED OFF AND ON WHICH LANDOWNERS EXPERIMENTED TO DISCOVER MORE PRODUCTIVE FARMING METHODS TO BOOST CROP YIELDS
    • CROP ROTATION: WAS THE SYSTEM OF GROWING DIFFERENT CROPS IN THE SAME FIELD ON SUCCEEDING YEARS TO PRESERVE THE FERTILITY OF THE SOIL. BOTH GREATLY INCREASED CROP YIELDS AND LED TO AN AGRICULTURAL REVOLUTION.
  • PATTERNS OF CHANGE: INDUSTRIALIZATION
  • POOR CITY DWELLERS
    • BECAUSE NO PLANS, SANITARY CODES, OR BUILDING REGULATIONS CONTROLLED THE RAMPANT GROWTH OF ENGLISH CITIES, THE POOR LACKED ADEQUATE HOUSING AND MANY WERE FORCED TO LIVE IN DARK, FILTLY, OVERCROWDED SLUMS UNDER VERY UNHEALTHY AND UNSAFE CONDITIONS.
  • FACTORY WORKERS
    • BECAUSE FACTORY OWNERS WANTED TO KEEP THEIR MACHINES RUNNING FOR AS A MANY HOURS A DAY AS POSSIBLE, WORKERS WERE FORCED TO WORK LONG HOURS FOR STARVATION WAGES, OFTEN UNDER DANGEROUS AND UNHEALTHY CONDITIONS, LATER, WORKING CONDITIONS AND THE STANDARD OF LIVING IMPROVED
  • WEALTHY MERCHANTS, FACTORY OWNERS, SHIPPERS
    • THEY GAINED WEALTH AND STATUS IN SOCIETY AND JOINED A GROWING MIDDLE CLASS OF SKILLED WORKERS, PROFESSIONALS, BUSINESS PEOPLE, AND WELL-TO-DO FARMERS.
  • CHILDREN
    • CHILDREN AS YOUNG AS SIX BEGAN TO WORK IN FACTORIES WITH THEIR FAMILIES FOR LONG HOURS UNDER BRUTAL CONDITIONS; CHILD LABOR LAWS LATER BROUGHT SOME REFORMS.
  • LOWER MIDDLE CLASS OF FACTORY OVERSEERS AND SKILLED WORKERS
    • THEY ENJOYED A COMFORTABLE STANDARD OF LIVING.
  • LARGE LANDOWNERS AND ARISTOCRATS
    • BECAUSE SOME FACTORY OWNERS, MERCHANTS, AND INVESTMENT BANKERS GREW WEALTHIER, THEY LOST SOME STATUS, RESPECT, AND POWER BUT CONTINUED TO LOOK DOWN ON THOSE WHO GAINED WEALTH IN BUSINESS
  • THE ENVIRONMENT
    • THE ENVIRONMENT WAS POLLUTED AND NATURAL RESOURCES WERE DEPLETED.
  • EDUCATION
    • EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES EXPANDED IN RESPONSE TO A NEED FOR SKILLED AND PROFESSIONAL WORKERS.
  • TERMS
    • URBANIZATION: THE MOVEMENT OF PEOPLE TO THE CITIES.
    • MIDDLE CLASS: MADE UP OF SKILLED WORKERS, PROFESSIONALS BUSINESS PEOPLE, AND WEALTHY FARMERS.
  • INDUSTRIALIZATION SPREADS
  • WHAT WERE SOME FAVORABLE CONDITIONS THAT SPARKED INDUSTRIALIZATION IN BOTH BRITAIN AND THE UNITED STATES?
    • WATER POWER, HARBORS, IRON ORE, COAL, VAST LABOR FORCE, POLITICAL STABILITY, FAVORABLE FINANCIAL SYSTEM.
  • WHAT FACTORS LED TO THE GREAT EXPANSION OF U.S. INDUSTRY IN THE LATE 1800s?
    • TECHNOLOGICAL BOOM, EXPANSION OF RAILROADS, FORMATION OF CORPORATIONS, AVAILABLE CAPITAL
  • HOW DID THE NAPOLEONIC WARS AFFECT THE DEVELOPMENT OF INDUSTRY IN EUROPE?
    • DELAYED INDUSTRIALIZATION BECAUSE WAR HALTED COMMUNICATIONS AND TRADE, DRAINED RESOURCES, AND CAUSED INFLATION AND POLITICAL INSTABILITY
  • HOW WOULD YOU CHARACTERIZE THE EXPANSION OF INDUSTRY THROUGHTOUT EUROPE DURING THE EARLY 1800s?
    • INDUSTRIALIZATION WAS REGIONAL RATHER THAN NATIONWIDE; SOME COUNTRIES DID NOT INDUSTRIALIZE BECAUSE OF GEOGRAPHIC OR SOCIAL OBSTACLES.
  • HOW DID INDUSTRIALIZATION SHIFT THE WORLD BALANCE OF POWER?
    • WIDENED EXISTING INEQUALITIES BETWEEN INDUSTRIALIZED AND NONINDUSTRIALIZED COUNTRIES AND PAVED THE WAY FOR IMPERIALISM
  • IN WHAT WAYS DID INDUSTRIALIZATION BENEFIT SOCIETY?
    • CREATED OPPORTUNITIES FOR ACHIEVING WEALTH, A COMFORTABLE STANDARD OF LIVING, EDUCATION, A HIGHER LIFE EXPECTANCY, AND DEMORATIC AND SOCIAL REFORMS
  • TERMS
    • CORPORATIONS: FORMED TO RAISE CAPITAL AND INCREASE PROFITS BY ENCOURAGING PEOPLE TO INVEST IN BUSINESS VENTURES THAT REDUCED THEIR FINANCIAL RISKS.
  • AN AGE OF REFORMS
  • ADAM SMITH
    • ECONOMIC LIBERTY GUARANTEED ECONOMIC PROGRESS GOVERNMENT NEED NOT INTERFERE IN THE ECONOMY.
  • THOMAS MALTHUS
    • POPULATION TENDED TO INCREASE MORE RAPIDLY THAN FOOD SUPPLY, WITHOUT WARS AND EPIDEMICS TO KILL OFF EXTRA POPULATION, MOST PEOPLE WOULD ALWAYS BE POOR.
  • DAVID RICARDO
    • THE PERMANENT UNDERCLASS WOULD ALWAYS BE POOR BECAUSE WAGES WOULD BE FORCED DOWN AS POPULATION INCREASED AND MORE WORKERS BECAME AVAILABLE.
  • JOHN STUART MILL
    • MILL WANTED GOVERNMENT TO DO AWAY WITH GREAT DIFFERENCE IN WEALTH; HE FAVORED A MORE EQUAL DIVISION OF PROFITS, A COOPERATIVE SYSTEM OF AGRICULTURE, AND WOMEN’S RIGHTS SUCH AS THE RIGHT TO VOTE.
  • ROBERT OWEN
    • HE IMPROVED WORKING AND LIVING CONDITIONS FOR EMPLOYEES IN THE MILLS BY RENTING THEM LOW-RENT HOUSING THAT HE BUILD, PROHIBITNG CHILDREN UNDER TEN FROM WORKING IN HIS MILLS, AND PROVIDING FREE SCHOOLING. HE ALSO FOUNDED A COOPERATIVE UTOPIAN COMMUNITY.
  • CHARLES FOURIER AND HENRI DE SAINT-SIMON
    • THEY ADVOCATED SOCIALISM, UNDER WHICH THE FACTORS OF PRODUCTION WOULD BE OWNED BY THE PUBLIC AND OPERATED FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL, AS A REPLACEMENT FOR FREE-MARKET CAPITALISM.
  • KARL MARX AND FRIEDRICH ENGELS
    • THEY PREDICTED THE DESTRUCTION OF THE CAPITALIST SYSTEM AND THE CREATION OF A CLASSLESS COMMUNIST STATE IN WHICH THE MEANS OF PRODUCTION WOULD BE OWNED BY THE PEOPLE.
  • WILLIAM WIBERFORCE
    • HE LED THE FIGHT IN PARLIAMENT FOR THE END OF THE SLAVE TRADE AND SLAVERY IN BRITISH EMPIRE.
  • JANE ADDAMS
    • SHE RAN A SETTLEMENT HOUSE TO PROVIDE SOCIAL SERVICES TO RESIDENTS OF A POOR NEIGHBORHOOD.
  • HORACE MANN
    • HE CALLED FOR FREE PUBLIC SCHOOLING FOR ALL CHILDREN.
  • TERMS
    • LAISSEZ-FAIRE: A FREE MARKET ECONOMY IN WHICH THE OWNERS OF INDUSTRY AND BUSINESS SET WORKING CONDITIONS WITHOUT GOVERNMENT CONTROLS
    • UNION: WORKERS JOINED TOGETHER TO FORM A VOLUNTARY ASSOCIATION.
    • COLLECTIVE BARGAINING: “ONE VOICE” IN NEGOTIATIONS WITH EMPLOYERS FOR BETTER WORKING CONDITIONS AND HIGHER WAGES.
    • STRIKE: THE REFUSAL TO WORK, TO SPEAK.