• Like
  • Save
Protista blog notes
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Protista blog notes

on

  • 1,050 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,050
Views on SlideShare
1,050
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Protista blog notes Protista blog notes Presentation Transcript

    • Introducing … the Protista!!
    • Protista Basics:
      • Include:
      • Protozoa
      • Algae
      • Slime molds
      • Water molds
      • All are eukaryotic
      • All lack tissue differentiation
    • Protozoa
      • Single-celled
      • Noted for their ability to move independently
      • Often called “animal-like” protista
      • About 65,000 species have been identified
      • Almost half of this number are extinct species
      • Live in many different environments
      • Are heterotrophs
      • Some are free-living, others parasitic
    • Protozoan Reproduction
      • All are capable of asexual reproduction
      • Called “binary fission”
      • Some species reproduce sexually
      • Called “conjugation”
      • Conjugation in protozoa is more complex than in bacteria
    • Phylum Sarcodina
      • 40,000 + species
      • Most have flexible cell membranes
      • Have unique features
      • Many are “naked” - cell membranes directly exposed to environment
    • Specializations
      • Have pseudopodia (“false feet”)
      • Are cytoplasmic extensions
      • Responsible for “amoeboid” movement
      • Also use them for feeding
      • Engulf via phagocytosis
      • Many have contractile vacuole
      • Expels material from cell
    • Radiolarians & Foraminiferans
      • Both have protective shells called, “tests”
      • Tests made of calcium carbonate
      • Responsible for limestone formations
      • Radiolarian tests form “chert” (flint)
      • Found primarily in oceans
      • Major ingredient in Egyptian pyramids
      • Radiolarians amongst oldest sarcodines
      • Existed since Precambrian time (500 million years ago)
      • Most radiolarians live in shallow water
    • Phylum Ciliophora
      • 8000 species
      • Move with cilia
      • Most elaborate organelles of any protozoa
      • Some structures include a mouth pore, gullet, and anal pore
      • Macronucleus - multiple copies of DNA
      • Needed for asexual reproduction
      • Micronucleus - needed for conjugation
    • Phylum Zoomastigina
      • 2500 species
      • One or more flagella
      • Called “zooflagellates”
      • Examples:
      • Trypanosoma genus
      • African trypanosomiasis - sleeping sickness; spread by tsetse fly
      • Mental deterioration, fever, coma
      • South American trypanosomiasis - Chaga’s disease. Spread by kissing bug.
      • Heart transplant required, no cure
    • Phylum Sporozoa
      • 6000 species
      • Most are parasitic - require vectors
      • Complex lifecycles, develop a protective cover called a “spore”
      • Most common called “Malaria”
      • Has killed more people than any other life form on the planet (2.7 million/yr)
    • Malaria Life-Cycle
      • Person bit (mosquito vectors)
      • Sporozoites enter blood stream
      • Travel to liver, divide repeatedly into merozoites
      • Merozoites infect red blood cells (asexual)
      • Merozoites burst from RBC’s ..release toxins over and over again, change into gametocytes
      • Drugs may not cure totally - lagging infection
      • Must have liver-stage drugs to cure
      • Mosquito can infect itself from a host vector’s gametocytes
    • Algae
      • It’s NOT moss!! (moss is Kingdom Plantae)
      • Photosynthetic
      • Produce up to 50% of the Earth’s oxygen supply
    • Phylum Chlorophyta
      • Green algae
      • Freshwater habitats
      • Can be single-celled or live in colonies
      • Lives in moist conditions
      • Ponds, some species on rock & tree surfaces
    • Phylum Phaeophyta
      • Brown algae
      • Found in cold saltwater environment
      • Giant kelp grow to over 100 m long
    • Phylum Rhodophyta
      • Red algae (Rhodo/red)
      • Found in warm saltwater environments
      • Depth depends on amount of pigment
    • Diatoms and Dinoflagellates
      • Both are considered algae
      • Diatoms:
      • Shells contain silica
      • Found in freshwater & saltwater
      • Component of phytoplankton
      • Dinoflagellates:
      • Cause algal blooms “red tide”
      • Can exhibit bioluminescence