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Spring09 D6 Financial And Program Needs
 

Spring09 D6 Financial And Program Needs

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Greeley-Evans Weld County (Colorado) District 6 Spring 2009 Financial and Program Needs

Greeley-Evans Weld County (Colorado) District 6 Spring 2009 Financial and Program Needs

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Spring09 D6 Financial And Program Needs Spring09 D6 Financial And Program Needs Presentation Transcript

  • Citizens’ Blue Ribbon Panel A Review of Introductory Meetings November 2008 – January 2009 Dr. Ranelle Lang, Superintendent Mr. Wayne Eads, Chief Operations Officer (Statistical Data Revised, January 2009)
  • The Purpose of the Panel
    • Continue community conversation and build on feedback gathered thus far
    • Assist District 6 staff with their moral and professional responsibility to provide the best education possible
    • Consider community expectations
  • District 6 Profile and Basic Facts 19,284 students 38 facilities 101 portable classrooms 2,307 employees
  • Our Schools
    • 15 elementary schools
    • 2 K-8 schools
    • 5 middle schools
    • 3 high schools
    • 4 alternative schools
    • 3 charter schools
    • 2 contracted or state-run facilities
  • Scope of Operations
    • Every day we have almost 22,000 people involved in our operations
    • Our students eat 2 million school meals a year
    • 8,000 students per day ride our school buses, which travel more than 1 million miles over the course of a year
    • We have 5,000 computers and 3,000 extensions on our phone/data network
  • The State of the District Our Celebrations
    • Increased student achievement
    • Removed from Academic Watch
    • Launched a district-wide continuous improvement process
    • Created and followed-through with a bold strategic plan
    • Earned numerous awards for achievement
  • The State of the District Our Celebrations
    • Increased student achievement
  • The State of the District Our Celebrations 110 strategic plan action steps 92% are complete or ongoing 8% being worked on this year
  • The approaching storms
    • Increasing Accountability
    Rising Expectations and Competition Lack of Money
  • The State of the District Storm 1: Increasing Accountability
    • Federal: No Child Left Behind and Adequate Yearly Progress
    • State: Accreditation
    • District: Comprehensive Accountability System, Achievement Gaps
    • School: School Accreditation System
  • The State of the District Storm 2: Rising Expectations and Competition
    • Parents and students are seeking expanded choices and services
    • Trend of academic improvement must continue
  • Community Expectations are Growing
    • Curriculum and textbooks
    • Computers other technology
    • Specialized programs: alternative schools, IB, AP & CTE
    • Safety and security
    • Transportation
    • and other areas
  • The State of the District Storm 3: Lack of Money
    • Financial resources do not match current or future needs and expectations
  • Financial Storm
    • 170 th
    Question: Of the 178 school districts in Colorado, where do we rank in total funding per student?
  • General Fund Revenue
    • Our general operating fund revenue is controlled by the State. Currently:
        • 25% comes from Greeley-Evans
          • Specific ownership taxes (vehicle registration)
          • Local property taxes
        • 75% comes from State Equalization funds
    • A mill levy override supplements the general fund and is not controlled by the State.
    • Unlike our neighbors, School District 6 has no mill levy override.
  • MLOs around Greeley-Evans: amount per student, every year Greeley- Evans: $0 Eaton: $710 Gilcrest-LaSalle- Platteville: $1,124 Loveland: $969 Johnstown-Milliken: $174 Fort Lupton: $1,155 Windsor: $692 Keenesburg: $609 St. Vrain: $690 2008-09 data Fort Collins: $773
  • 2008-09 data District State Funding Per Student Mill Levy Override Funding Per Student Total Weld County Re-8 Fort Lupton $7,022 $1,155 $8,177 Weld County Re-1 Gilcrest, La Salle, Platteville $6,891 $1,124 $8,015 Thompson Loveland, Berthoud $6,554 $969 $7,523 St. Vrain Longmont, Firestone, Frederick $6,777 $690 $7,467 Weld County Re-2 Eaton $6,703 $710 $7,413 Weld County Re-3J Keenesburg $6,759 $609 $7,368 Poudre Fort Collins $6,554 $773 $7,327 Weld County Re-4 Windsor $6,554 $692 $7,246 Weld County 6 Greeley, Evans $6,732 $0 $6,732 Weld County Re-5J Johnstown, Milliken $6,554 $174 $6,728
  • MLOs + per-pupil funding 2008-09 data
  •  
  • Where is our revenue spent? This container represents our general operating fund Our general operating fund for the current fiscal year is $128,334,016
  • Expenditures The vast majority of the budget is spent on employee salaries and benefits. Everything else (utilities, fuel, textbooks, etc.) makes up just 13% of the budget. 13% 87% Utilities, fuel, textbooks, etc. People (salaries and benefits)
  • Expenditures Utilities 32% Professional fees 4% Other 5% Repairs, maint. & equipment 5% Textbooks 6% Computers and technology 6% Tuition 9% Purchased services 12% Supplies, postage, printing, etc. 21% 13% 87% Utilities, fuel, textbooks, etc. People (salaries and benefits)
  • Expenditures Teachers 71% Instructional aides 5% Bus/Facilities staff 8% Principals 6% Office/Support staff 4% Professional staff 3% Administrators 3% 13% 87% Utilities, fuel, textbooks, etc. People (salaries and benefits)
  • Higher Costs = Forced Choices If costs increase in any area, some other cost area must be reduced in order to make room. Purchased Items Teachers Instructional aides Bus/Facilities staff Principals Office/Support staff Professional staff Administrators
  • Forced Choices in 2008-09
    • Fewer people (central administrators, teachers, classified staff, non-classroom substitutes)
    • Less technology
    • Limited textbooks, school materials and supplies
    • Less classified overtime
    • Smaller raises for support staff and administrators than teachers
  • Forced Choices in 2009-10
    • If nothing changes…
      • will have to make cuts to purchased items,
      • and/or eliminate or reduce programs,
      • and/or reduce staff.
    • Community choice
      • Should we reduce programs, materials or staff?
      • Should we maintain programs, materials or staff?
      • Should we enhance programs, materials or staff?
    • Increasing Accountability
    Rising Expectations and Competition Lack of Money
  • Process and Timelines
    • Dozens of citizen volunteers who are:
      • Reviewing district programs and areas of need
      • Reviewing costs and expenses
      • Asking questions, seeking clarification, being critics
      • Prioritizing the areas of need
      • Recommending course of action to the Board of Education in August 2009
    • Areas being studied, based on community and staff feedback:
      • Academic Programs
      • Student and Teacher Resources
      • Safety and Security
      • Special Programs: Co-Curricular and Extracurricular
      • Operations, Facilities and Transportation
    • Some of the items being reviewed by the Academic Programs committee:
      • Increase program offerings for students, including International Baccalaureate (IB) and Advanced Placement (AP) classes
      • Counseling services at all schools
      • Increase technology access and use in the classroom
      • Full-day kindergarten and preschool for all students
      • Career and Technical Education (CTE)
        • Estimated “100% costs”: $24,409,350
    • Some of the items being reviewed by the Co/Extracurricular committee:
      • After-school program for all students
      • Soccer program for Middle School students
      • Upgrades to athletic equipment and facilities
      • Equitable athletic and fine arts offerings to all students at all schools
      • Upgrades to fine arts equipment and facilities (i.e. band uniforms, instruments)
        • Estimated “100% costs”: TBD
    • Some of the items being reviewed by the Student/Teacher Resources committee:
      • Textbooks for all students
      • Appropriate intervention materials and consumables for all students (workbooks, etc.)
      • Additional classroom aides for students
      • Appropriate materials and technology resources in every classroom (whiteboards, overheads, LCDs, etc.)
        • Estimated “100% costs”: $19,808,366
    • Some of the items being reviewed by the Safety/Security committee:
      • Campus monitors for all schools
      • Video cameras for security monitoring of all entrances
      • Safety lighting on campuses
      • Parking lot updates and traffic flow support
      • Crossing guards
        • Estimated “100% costs”: $709,500
    • Some of the items being reviewed by the Operations/Facilities/Transportation committee:
      • Updates to schools and district buildings to ensure safety of students and staff
      • Replace portable buildings with appropriate classrooms for student learning
      • Provide lockers for middle school students
      • Provide district-wide transportation for field trips and special programs
        • Estimated “100% costs”: $38,661,384
    • Timeline:
    • Now through April
      • committees review and prioritize areas of need
    • April
      • committees present their findings and priorities to full CBRP
      • CBRP citizen leadership begins narrowing focus on highest priorities
      • CBRP begins drafting advisory recommendation to Board of Education
    • Timeline:
    • May
      • CBRP finishes draft of advisory recommendation to Board of Education
    • May and June
      • CBRP citizen leadership gathers community feedback on draft recommendations, adjusts draft as needed
    • July
      • CBRP citizen leadership gives final draft to BOE
    • Timeline:
    • July
      • CBRP citizen leadership gives final advisory recommendation to BOE
    • August
      • BOE takes action on recommendations
  •  
  • Frequently Asked Questions regarding mill levy overrides
  • Don’t we already have a mill levy?
    • The current mill levy goes into the state equalization fund.
        • 25% comes from Greeley-Evans
          • Specific ownership taxes (vehicle registration)
          • Local property taxes
        • 75% comes from State Equalization funds
    • Mill levy override dollars stay in our community.
  • What is a mill levy?
    • “ Mill” does not mean a million
    • “ Mill” comes from the Latin “mille” which means one thousand.
    • So a “mill levy” in tax language is a tax of one/one thousandth of the value of something
  • What is a mill levy override ?
    • The State sets the funding formula for K-12 districts.
    • Local K-12 districts can vote to tax themselves at a higher rate than the State formula.
    • If local taxpayers approve a tax rate higher than the State formula, they “override” the State formula and provide more funding for the education of their children.
  • How much does a mill cost a homeowner? One mill costs the owner of a $100,000 home 67 cents per month.
  • Show me the math!
    • The assessor sends every homeowner a Notice of Valuation .
    • This sets the actual value of a home (this is not the market value, but should be close).
    • This notice also tells you what percent of the actual value will be subject to property tax. Currently that percent is 7.96%.
  • Tax Process
    • The assessor also sends the Real Estate Property Tax Notice .
    • This notice actually shows the calculation for your property tax bill.
    • The actual value is multiplied by the assessment percentage to find the assessed value.
  • If Actual Value = $100,000
    • Taxable value = 7.96% of $100,000
    • = $7,960
    • Cost of one mill = $7,960/1,000
    • = $7.96 per year
    • Monthly cost per mill = $7.96/12 = $.67
    • = $.67 per month
  • The Actual Cost of a Mill
    • A $200,000 average home: Mill cost $1.34 per month
    • 15 mill on a $200,000 home: $20.10 per month
    • Yearly cost on a $200,000 home: $241.20 or:
      • 1 Starbucks Venti Mocha per week (estimated cost $4.20)
      • 1 trip to McDonalds per month for a family of 4 (estimated cost $20)
      • 2 music CDs per month (each CD costs approximately $12)
  • Does an MLO Affect Businesses?
    • Yes, business properties are assessed at a higher rate, currently 29%.
    • The math process is the same.
    • 15 mills on a $1 million business property would cost a business owner:
      • $362.50 per month or
      • $4,350 per year.
  • Does an MLO Affect Senior Citizens?
    • Senior Homestead Exemption
    • If you meet the criteria, 50% of the first $200,000 of actual value of residential property is exempt from taxation.
    • A property owner must be 65 years old and have owned and occupied the property as a primary residence for the last 10 years.
    • This exemption is contingent on yearly funding from the Colorado Legislature.
      • It is currently funded and in full effect
      • There have been prior years where the exemption was not funded by the legislature and the exemption was suspended.
  • How Much Revenue Does a Mill Generate?
    • Considering the overall assessed value in Weld County, right now one mill would generate approximately $1 million for Weld County School District 6.
    • If property values decline, the revenue generated would go down as well.
  • What about charter schools?
    • State law does not require charters to be included. Each community makes its own decision.
    • In some communities they have been included and in some they have not. This will be some of the work of the CBRP.
    • Generally, the details of charter participation are outlined in contracts with the district.
    • Interest and support of the MLO is created through knowledge and conversation.