Quertle

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Basics of Quertle

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Quertle

  1. 1. Quertle<br />
  2. 2. What is Quertle?<br />More than simple keyword searching, Quertle has created a database of 250 million “relationships” that retrieves citations relevant to the query. <br />Quertle uses MEDLINE/PubMed as provided by the National Library of Medicine and full-text documents from BioMed Central and PubMed Central. <br />
  3. 3. Brief overview <br />Quertle is based on relationships between words/concepts<br />Known as “Relationship Triplets” which is <br /> subject-verb-object<br />Uses biomedical-specific natural language processing, which finds possible sentence structures then converts to a semantic tree<br />
  4. 4. How to Make a Query<br />Aspirin treats headaches<br />What treats headaches?<br />Aspirin treats what?<br />Headache $Treatments<br />Aspirin $Treatments<br />Somewhat case sensitive<br />AIDS vs aids<br />(“AIDS” as a disease and “aids” as a verb)<br />No Boolean logic <br />No “AND” “OR” “NOT”<br />No double quotes<br />You can search…<br />But you should know…<br />
  5. 5. Other Features: Power Terms<br />Power Terms = $<br />Query terms to represent a class of entities/objects. <br />For example: $Diseases represents all diseases<br />Cannot create your own Power Terms, the list located under the search bar<br />Most common power terms:<br />
  6. 6. Other Features: Filters<br />Filters<br />“Also Containing”<br />Refining search terms<br />“Published Within”<br />“Publication Type”<br />“Key Concepts”<br />Terms Quertle automatically identifies as “key concepts” in the results set<br />“General Concepts” are additional concepts that may be of interest <br />
  7. 7. Comparison of Acupuncture and Depression: OVID<br />Ovid has 357 citations for the term “acupuncture” <br />When combined with depression, only 3 results<br />
  8. 8. Comparison of Acupuncture and Depression: CINAHL<br />A better database to search this topic, “acupuncture” has over 6,000 citations<br />When combined with depression, 153 results<br />
  9. 9. Comparison of Acupuncture and Depression: PubMed<br />Using classic Boolean logic, “acupuncture and depression” has 417 results <br />
  10. 10. Comparison of Acupuncture and Depression: Quertle<br /> Depends on the verb used for relationship results<br />“For” = 76<br />“Cures” = 4<br />“Helps” = 0<br />“Affects” = 2<br />“Treats” = 4<br />Interestingly, the Keyword Results were always over 500, although the exact number changed slightly depending on the verb used<br />
  11. 11. Applying Key Concepts<br />Depending on the verb used, key concepts can help focus the search<br />In this case, choosing “treatment” when searching “acupuncture for depression” highlights 25 citations that directly relates to the treatment of depression with acupuncture<br />
  12. 12. Initial Thoughts<br />Asking direct questions can be helpful when searching topics that aren’t complicated<br />However, confining the search query to three words can be irritating if the right verb isn’t used<br />The Key Concepts side bar can help focus the search, but again depends on what verb was used<br />The Power Terms can be useful, but it’s topic dependent<br />

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