Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Media violence presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Media violence presentation

5,745
views

Published on

Published in: Education

1 Comment
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
5,745
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
60
Comments
1
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • This is from The Elements of Style. Please read. Every word must tell. Every word must do work for you. Repetition is judiciously done, like here! Do not be afraid to repeat similar words. Do not get out the thesaurus, but use the proper word.
  • Transcript

    • 1. What the Debate Hides
      A an assessment of the media violence debate and the issues neglected due to its prominence
      by Paige Howarth and Libby Hall
      Click speakers for narration!!!!
    • 2. Objectives:
      Define and explain the media violence debate
      Explain the argument that says that exposure to violence in the media causes later aggression.
      Expose the weaknesses supporting the main arguments of the violence debate
      Prove that the debate is actually just hiding social issues such as politics, elitism, and class differences
    • 3. The violence-media debate:
      Does prolonged exposure to violence in the media cause increased aggression and violence in young people?
      The media violence debate surrounds the question whether children’s exposure to violent television and other media leads to future aggressive behavior.
      One sides states that children's viewing of violent TV shows, their identification with aggressive same-sex TV characters, and their perceptions that TV violence is realistic are all linked to later aggression as young adults, for both males and females. That is the conclusion of a 15-year longitudinal study of 329 youth published in the March issue of Developmental Psychology, a journal of the American Psychological Association (APA).and: Among the tenets that most psychologists embrace as self-evident, the negative effects of media violence on children holds a special place. Virtually every major professional organization concerned with the development of children has issued an unequivocal policy statement about the harmful effects of violent media,vs. The other side to this debate can be described by the view of Jonathan Freedman of the University of Toronto, who maintains "the scientific evidence simply does not show that watching violence either produces violence in people, or desensitizes them to it."
    • 4. The Two Sides of the Debate
      Exposure to Media Violence Causes increased Aggression in Children
      Vs
      There is no relation to media violence and aggression in children.
      The media violence debate surrounds the question whether children’s exposure to violent televsion and other media leads to future aggressive behavior.
      One sides states that children's viewing of violent TV shows, their identification with aggressive same-sex TV characters, and their perceptions that TV violence is realistic are all linked to later aggression as young adults, for both males and females. That is the conclusion of a 15-year longitudinal study of 329 youth published in the March issue of Developmental Psychology, a journal of the American Psychological Association (APA).Among the tenets that most psychologists embrace as self-evident, the negative effects of media violence on children holds a special place. Virtually every major professional organization concerned with the development of children has issued an unequivocal policy statement about the harmful effects of violent media,The other side to this debate can be described by the view of Jonathan Freedman of the University of Toronto, who maintains "the scientific evidence simply does not show that watching violence either produces violence in people, or desensitizes them to it."
    • 5. Weak Evidence for Most Popular Side
      “Media Violence causes aggression”, side of debate most popular among society
      The support for this argument is weak:
      Range of other factors
    • 6. Misguided Conversation
      Exposure causes aggression
      Other ignored factors cause aggression
      Class Differences
      Elitism
      Politics
    • 7. Class Differences/Elitism and Their Effect on Children and Later Aggression
      Class differences in television viewing usage
      Race Elitism
      The other
      There are differences in the way the public applies the media to daily life. The lower class primarily use media for entertainment and escape while the middle class focuses on hard information – a prime example of socially stratified behavior. Theoretical attention should be paid to the proposition that an individual's range of spoken behaviors fits with the range of media behaviors, together forming a communication repertoire that correlates with social stratification.Previous research has indicated that a number of demographicfactors, particularly ethnicity and socioeconomic status, aresignificantly related to children's use of television. Yet thesefactors are often not integrated into research relating television-viewingbehavior to psychological and social variables of interest.In the present study of three samples of upper elementary schoolstudents, ethnicity was found to be a strong determinant ofthe amount of television viewed. Black children viewed nearlytwice as much television as White children, independent of parents'level of education, which itself was inversely related to viewingfrequency. No clear relationship was found between viewing frequencyand sex, birth order, or number of siblings, according to studies done by SeamoreFeshbach of Bryn Mawr College.Jib Fowles claims that an argument missing from the television violence debate is about “the Other”. In European society, the Other is of Oriental descent while in the United States, this figure is the Dark Other of African American or Hispanic American descent. He hypothesizes that in both television and in reality, the Dark Other’s culture, viewing habits, and behaviors are disparaged. The elitists of the society fear the Dark Other because of what they have come to stand for in society as a whole which include our fear of difference, of being prayed upon, of having our culture overturned and of invalidating our cultural identity. In the end, Fowles found that while we push away this Dark Other from our lives and television viewing, the elitists always end up beckoning the Dark Other back. Whites are fascinated by not only their dress and music but also their athletic prowess and behaviors. Whites call upon the Dark Other entertainers to portray the violent roles in television.
    • 8. Politics and its Effect on the Livelihoods of Children
      Welfare Laws
      Education Funding cuts
      Afterschool programs
      Scholarship opportunities
    • 9. Conclusion
      Media Violence Debate hides the effects of class differences, elitism, and the neglectful politics
    • 10. Sources:
      http://www.apa.org/releases/media_violence.html
      http://culturalpolicy.uchicago.edu/conf2001/papers/engle.html
      http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/issues/violence/effects_media_violence.cfm
      http://www.apa.org/releases/media_violence.html
      http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1P3-637663721.html
      http://books.google.com/books?id=l_wD_mxdyEoC&dq=media+violence+debate&printsec=frontcover&source=bl&ots=QQ0uuF4mqA&sig=gWdvnmfTHg0zhKZJq09NQatrpoU&hl=en&ei=0tHESvarBcrL8Qbv9dVF&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=11#v=onepage&q=&f=false
      http://www.ed.gov/Speeches/09-1994/strong.html
      http://www.eric.ed.gov:80/ERICWebPortal/custom/portlets/recordDetails/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED168008&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED168008
      http://psp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/14/1/145
      http://reason.com/archives/2001/03/01/the-whipping-boy/2