Agile for project managers - A presentation for PMI

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A sailor's analogy to explain the core principles and project management practices of agile methods

A sailor's analogy to explain the core principles and project management practices of agile methods

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  • 1. Agile for Project Managers A sailor’s look at Agile A presentation for A presentation for Produced by Square Peg Consulting, LLC Orlando, Florida www.sqpegconsulting.com 1Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 2. Agile and Sailing? Really? Photo: US Navy Ok, lets get started! 2Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 3. Begin with small teams Collaboration and trust Instinctive action without direct commands Proven protocols and practices Crew master on the helm (wheel) Redundancy among crew Risks managed real-time Photo: US Navy 3 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 4. Scope: sailing for the marks Customer (sponsor) Sailing for the marks prospective expectation: ‘make the mark’ Retrospective: Best value—most that can be accomplished Every sailor— individually and collectively—is committed 4 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 5. Adjusting Scope But… marks are Sailing for the new mark updated, added new, or even deleted from time to time Architect drives the distribution of marks 5 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 6. Lay-line is the backlog plan Lay-line: most efficient course from “here” to “there” Lay-line → ‘backlog’ Lay-line → ‘planned value’ PV Sailing the ‘lay line accumulates value 6 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 7. Wind is a source of energy Motive energy for the boat (project) Source of risks and unknowns Represents (also) stakeholder biases, attitudes, and pressures Complex and unpredictable 7 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 8. It all interacts: complex and adaptive Boat-sails-rigging: methodology and practices Wind: energy, risks Mark: scope and sponsor expectations Lay-line: back-log & plan to make the ‘mark’ Overall course: architecture Complex: A system of many structural parts with uncertain interactions and behaviors Adaptive: A system with input-to-output transform that changes over time to maintain fidelity of expectation 8 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 9. From energy to value1. Maximize energy from favorable wind2. Apply wind energy to create velocity3. Measure velocity along the lay-line4. Accumulate value by distance sailed on the lay-line Accumulated valued (distance): velocity along the lay-line x elapsed time 9 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 10. Accumulate earned valueThe segmented lay-line is the value planEV strategy: Sail as close to the line as possibleValue is earned when the mark is reached 10Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 11. Tack to the mark Tactical response to circumstances Emergent with the wind Variance to the planned lay-line Short performance increments (time box)Tacking: sailing one direction and then the other across the lay-line 11 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 12. Most pessimistic forecast Wind (risk) directly opposes the boat (project) Least energy available in the direction of the lay-line Strategy:  Find energy ‘off axis’ (evolve the plan)  Tack (incremental performance) across the lay-line Wind 12
  • 13. Progress on the lay-line Most Pessimistic progress forecast ❖Output / Input ❖EV efficiency ❖Example 1.4 / 2 = 70% Lay-line Wind (energy and risk) 1 Input 1 increments 1.4 Output: projected along the lay-line 13 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 14. Benchmarks forecast velocity  Velocity creates throughput  Throughput is "miles sailed" on the lay-line  "Miles sailed" are like story points’ accomplished 14Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 15. Benchmark units of performance Velocity = performance units per unit of time  Performance Unit (Story point) = Nautical mile (NM)  Unit of time (Time Box) = 1 hour  Example: 8 knots velocity = 8 NM per hourPhoto: City of Baltimore 15 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 16. Cost estimating with benchmarks 1. Backlog (performance units)  Vision, strategic direction, architecture 2. Velocity benchmark  Benchmark from reference case (similar architecture, similar environment, similar crew) 3. Unit cost benchmark (cost per unit of time )  Crew and boat Inputs 𝐵𝑎𝑐𝑘𝑙𝑜𝑔 Expected cost = ∗ Unit cost 𝑉𝑒𝑙𝑜𝑐𝑖𝑡𝑦 Calculation 16Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 17. Schedule (earned schedule) Earned schedule: effective time made along the lay-line ES = Total duration x efficiencyEfficiency:effective duration / total duration Photo: US NIST 17 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 18. Schedule Example• Planning metrics – 40 NM lay-line – 8 Knot velocity benchmark – Earnable schedule: 40/8 = 5 hours• Most pessimistic forecast: 𝑂𝑢𝑡𝑝𝑢𝑡 40 – 𝐼𝑛𝑝𝑢𝑡 = = = 57NM 𝐿𝑎𝑦 𝑙𝑖𝑛𝑒 𝑒𝑓𝑓𝑖𝑐𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑦 0.7 57 – 𝐷𝑢𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 = = 7.2 ℎ𝑜𝑢𝑟𝑠 8 18 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 19. Scale is manageable The fleet has sortiedPhoto: Nicoyogui on flickr 19 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 20. Scale is manageable Vision and strategic direction  Conveyed from the fleet captain Each boat is a self-directing team,  But learns from the performance of others Protocols observed  For communication, sequencing, and coordination Each boat maintains situational awareness 20 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 21. Rolling Wave planning Boats on the leading edge of the fleet relay over the horizon information to others Far out lay-lines planned as approached And finally: Adjustments made for obstructions and wind shifts The end! 21 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 22. All done and ready for questions! 22Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 23. The author of this seminarJohn C Goodpasture, PMPProgram manager, author, coach,and instructor• PMI eSeminarsWorldsm instructor for Advanced Agile Project Management, and• Advanced Risk Management, and• Understanding Organizational ChangePortfolio manager and business unitleader• Operations and IT professional info@sqpegconsulting.com johngoodpasture.com 23 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 24. Read more …..• Jim Highsmith: “Agile Project Management: Creating innovative products”• Dean Leffingwell: “Agile Software Requirements: Lean requirements practices for Teams, Programs, and the Enterprise”• Mike Cohn: “Agile Estimating and Planning”• Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory: “Agile Testing: A practical guide for Testers and Agile Teams”• John Goodpasture: “Project Management the Agile Way: Making it work in the Enterprise” 24 Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved
  • 25. John sailed with the Eau Gallie Yacht Club, Eau Gallie, FL 25Copyright 2012 Square Peg Consultiing, All Rights Reserved