Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Jennifer Gidman Writing Samples Portfolio

  • 40,181 views
Uploaded on

Hi. Welcome to my SlideShare writing portfolio, which includes samples of:...

Hi. Welcome to my SlideShare writing portfolio, which includes samples of:

• Interview- and research-focused feature writing for brandchannel.com (an online portal dedicated to branding) and the print and online versions of Studio Photography magazine (a B2B publication geared toward professional photographers)

• A custom advertorial series (targeted at professional wedding photographers) that I created for Nikon for 9 years

• A custom marketing e-newsletter I help create monthly for Tamron USA

• A travel photography series I put together for Tamron to appear on retail vendor Web sites

• Copywriting for ads/brochures for Interstate Lumber

• Blogs for ImagingInfo.com (a Web site for the professional photographer and photo retailer) and Inside-Voice.com (a parenting blog I co-founded)

• Ghostwriting I performed for a diet book by Boo Grace.

More samples are available on request. Please refer to my editing portfolio (coming soon!) for my editing, copyediting, and content management experience.

More in: Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
40,181
On Slideshare
40,162
From Embeds
19
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
27
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 19

http://www.lmodules.com 9
http://www.linkedin.com 9
http://emr.medicbd.com 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.                 Search always branding. always on.   Latest News In Depth  Papers  Books  Brandcameo  Directory  Careers  Branding Glossary          You should register for our newsletter You should also:    follow us on Twitter,      add us on Facebook,   join us on LinkedIn,   subscribe to our RSS  and send us your story ideas at:   tips@brandchannel.com               elsewhere on brandchannel It’s a revamp­gone­wrong tale that has already secured  < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 > its place in the annals of packaging: PepsiCo retains  Arnell Group to redesign its Tropicana Pure Premium  orange juice cartons as part of its new ad campaign.     Said cartons make their aisle debut in January, minus     the familiar straw­punctured orange and sporting a        modernized depiction of—well, fresh­squeezed juice.  Consumers revolt and demand the old packaging  back. Two months and a reported US$ 35 million later,    PepsiCo reverts back to the original Tropicana  packaging, straw between its legs (and back on the  carton).  There’s nothing unusual about a perennial product  Will Windows 7 revive Microsoft's  Packaging Service Brands All Customers Are Irrational Jason Fry Tecnisa Construction Company Branding Airports Where The Wild Things Are Surprising Secret of Successful  Odwalla revisiting its packaging, labels or logos in an attempt to bring outdated aesthetics up to par with an  brand? Brands and employees must work  A marketing book about the human  An interview on how to grow a  Why this successful Brazilian  Why branding will take off with  A boy disappears into his  Differentiation Does this fruit drink and smoothie  enduring brand message. Camel cigarettes underwent its first package redesign in 90 years in 2008.  Join our debate on what brands  together to succeed in such a  subconscious and how it makes us  powerful brand in the routine  company is building both bonds and passengers, airports and the  imagination full of monsters, ideals,  Why effective differentiation means  brand have the right mix of  should and shouldn cluttered marketplace. behave. sunflower seed category. its brand. brands that travel with them. and Converse brandcameos. thinking beyond the core benefits of  ingredients online? ’t do when  Bacardi, which has been distilling spirits since the 1860s, has updated its bottles to “reflect the  reacting to shifts in public opinion. your product category. sophisticated consumer environment.” And then there’s Pepsi, which introduced a new logo last fall  (Arnell Group was also responsible for this design do­over, to mixed reviews).  most viewed posts Charmin To Staff NYC Restrooms  But if the brand is still enjoying hefty market share, why putter around with its packaging? Tropicana  With Bloggers For The Holidays   has historically dominated number­two Minute Maid (owned by PepsiCo rival Coca­Cola) in the OJ  category. “Sometimes [package redesign] has nothing to do with the business at all—it [comes] down  Phillies' Rise Mirrors Philly's Rise    to the new personnel working on the brand, hell­bent on making a mark on their career,” says Dyfed  MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does  “Fred” Richards, executive creative director, North America, for global branding consultancy Interbrand, Retail   which also produces brandchannel. “It’s sometimes difficult for brand managers to demonstrate growth  of a brand they’re being tasked to manage and grow. But a new package design associated with those Martha Stewart Brands A Turkey   changes demonstrates these changes.” Cause Marketing Grows, But Is A  Backlash Ahead?   The agencies commissioned for a redesign may also share some of the blame for failed packaging  overhauls—think about if Mad Men creative director Don Draper’s powers of persuasion were magnified  by corporate fears of losing market share in a depressed economy. “Design companies should be  recent posts asking far smarter questions at the outset of the changes to really understand the reasons for the  Around The Web: Confirm Friend  change,” Richards says. “Sadly, many [of these] companies enjoy the design process so much that  Request  design for design’s sake takes over, and all reason jumps out of the window for the benefit of a trend or MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does  effect they’ve wanted to try.”  Retail  Could this be what happened with the Arnell Group redesign strategy for the Pepsi logo that leaked  Martha Stewart Brands A Turkey  onto the Internet last year? In the 27­page report, simply titled “Breathtaking,” the authors cite such  Phillies' Rise Mirrors Philly's Rise   lofty influences as the golden rectangle (that aesthetically pleasing formula found in architectural and  artistic masterpieces like the Mona Lisa and the Parthenon); magnetic geodynamics; and Hindu  Coke Sends Bloggers On An "Open  Happiness" World Tour   numerical harmonics as all leading up to the design revolution that is the new Pepsi logo. This is excessive profundity for a visual representation that, at the risk of oversimplifying the process,    just took the old logo, rotated it and distorted the white middle wave. And while there ’s plenty in the  Will Starbuck's Via instant coffee  undermine the brand? report about brand geometry, perimeter oscillations and color theory, what’s notable is a lack of  discussion of either the product itself or the consumer. j k l m n No Arnell Group still hasn’t verified the report as being authentic. However, Peter Arnell’s somewhat 
  • 2. Happiness" World Tour   numerical harmonics as all leading up to the design revolution that is the new Pepsi logo. This is excessive profundity for a visual representation that, at the risk of oversimplifying the process,    just took the old logo, rotated it and distorted the white middle wave. And while there ’s plenty in the  Will Starbuck's Via instant coffee  undermine the brand? report about brand geometry, perimeter oscillations and color theory, what’s notable is a lack of  discussion of either the product itself or the consumer. j k l m n No Arnell Group still hasn’t verified the report as being authentic. However, Peter Arnell’s somewhat  j k l m n rambling defense of the Tropicana debacle is comprised of similar stream­of­consciousness  Yes associations between squeezing oranges, hugging children, and ensuring consistency between the    purity of the juice and the carton. Combine this with the grammatically awkward tagline,  “Squeeze… VOTE     It’s a Natural,” and you’re left to wonder: is this branding genius or simply marketing mumbo­jumbo?  Show Results Extreme Package Makeover Polls Archive  With properly ascertained research and consumer feedback, however, a brand can, and should, make  an informed decision to redesign its packaging or logo. “Any brand should be looking at itself in the  mirror 24/7 and measuring itself against all its competitors,” Richards says. “If a brand is in a  leadership position, then it should be protecting and leveraging those key equities at all times in an  effort to reinforce the reasons why it’s the market leader.”  All parties involved need to carefully tread the redesign waters. “Understand the brand’s history,”  Richards explains. “Talk to and listen to loyal consumers. This isn’t about sticking a pretty label on a  box and hoping you win a design award. All the assets of the brand need careful evaluation to find out  equity stretch points and equities that are sacrosanct to the consumer. More often than not, you’re not designing for your client, and certainly not for yourself—you’re designing for the consumer.”  Even after studying the ins and outs of a brand, there’s still that slippery slope to navigate in  contemporizing an iconic brand’s packaging, label or logo while still retaining its most identifiable  elements and the equity it’s built up over the years. “There’s a fine line between being relevant and  being trendy,” Richards explains. “Updating requires a craft that can only be learned over many years  of experience. I always tell my designers that working on the less glamorous brands is character ­ building [work], not on the boutique brands that essentially come and go and fall prey to the latest  tricks and trends.”  While designers should be aware of the new designs around them, they should be careful of what they  leverage in their day­to­day dealings with brands they are charged to develop, Richards says. “I ask all  of my designers to keep personal scrapbooks that are evaluated on a regular basis in one­on­one  sessions,” he says. “I want to see what’s motivating them, what inspires them. It could be a ticket  stub from a concert or a great piece of type from an ad—it doesn’t matter, as long as they are curious  [about] the world around them and download the information in a book rather than carrying this  information as graphic noise in their heads. That noise might then become an impure insert into a  brand’s future that won’t resonate with the consumer.”   Pulp Friction   Tropicana’s carton conundrum is a compelling story on a couple of fronts. First, there’s the juicy,  schadenfreude­esque media obsession—the panned carton was one of the most blogged topics the  week of February 23–27, behind only the machinations of President Obama’s new administration,  according to the Project for Excellence in Journalism’s New Media Index. But even more unusual has been the astonishing backlash from a usually silent, brand­loyal  contingent, and PepsiCo’s eventual acquiescence to these vitamin C devotees. Feedback on the  design, relayed to PepsiCo via letters, phone calls and e­mails, has ranged from deeming the cartons  “ugly” to expressing outright confusion—some customers passed right by Tropicana cartons on store  shelves, mistaking the new packaging for private­label offerings. “What’s evident from my experience  and perspective is that key equities of the brand were thrown away for a generic offering, and  consumers reacted,” Richards says.  Despite such a marketing blunder, however, Tropicana­gate has demonstrated that the brand’s  followers cared enough about the brand to effect change. “I think it’s a blessing for Pepsi that the  consumers didn’t react by walking away from the brand,” Richards says. “We all remember what  happened with New Coke.”  In these troubling economic times, this type of loyalty is an indicator of what roles brands play in our  lives. “The rise of private label is clear (64 percent last year), and orange juice is a commodity  category,” Richards says. “But consumers need their ‘comfort brands’—eventually the message [of  these comfort brands] will get through, and consumers become incredibly powerful brand advocates.  So when the message changes in such a dramatic fashion, as it did with Tropicana, the consumer  feels betrayed.”  Revolution among the common folk is starting to resonate with the brands they’re revolting against.  Facebook users, for instance, recently took issue with certain amendments to the site’s terms of  service. As a result, the social­networking platform temporarily reverted back to its old terms. And  when CBS canceled the prime­time TV show Jericho, disgruntled fans delivered 20 tons of peanuts to  CBS offices (the network cracked and resurrected the show). There are brands that have taken consumer opinion one step further, involving the public in actual    packaging makeovers. Nestlé, for example, is tapping into social media to elicit consumer input for  new packaging for its Goobers, Sno­Caps and Oh Henry! candy lines (the package redesign that gets  the most votes will be on shelves by the end of 2009). And in celebration of its 150th anniversary,  Eight O’Clock Coffee is letting consumers direct its packaging facelift by registering their votes at  CoffeeMaker.com (with a chance to win a year’s worth of groceries to boot).  Of course, there’s empowering consumers with some say, and then there’s giving the consumers a  laptop loaded with graphic­design software and directing them to redesign the packaging from scratch.
  • 3. new packaging for its Goobers, Sno­Caps and Oh Henry! candy lines (the package redesign that gets  the most votes will be on shelves by the end of 2009). And in celebration of its 150th anniversary,  Eight O’Clock Coffee is letting consumers direct its packaging facelift by registering their votes at  CoffeeMaker.com (with a chance to win a year’s worth of groceries to boot).  Of course, there’s empowering consumers with some say, and then there’s giving the consumers a  laptop loaded with graphic­design software and directing them to redesign the packaging from scratch. “I’m a firm believer in engaging consumers at every level of the design process,” Richards says.  “Listen to them first, show them what they know, listen again. Then think about what you’ve heard— put images to the spoken word and play them back. Ensure there’s a clear meaning behind every  image and every word. Go on a shopping trip with the consumer from the moment the grocery list is  being created to the point of selection at shelf to purchase to use in the home; do the same thing  yourself. But don’t let the client or consumer design: brand design is a craft, not a beauty contest.”  So it’s back to the drawing board (or maybe not) for Tropicana. The old cartons are expected to  reappear on store shelves this month. The only remnants of the US$ 35 million Arnell experiment will  be the cute, orange­shaped plastic caps, which will be retained on cartons of low­calorie Trop50. The  advertising campaign that’s currently in place will also continue.  Perhaps this could have all been avoided if PepsiCo had sought out real consumer input in the first  place. “Respect the brand and the role it has to play in the hearts and minds of the consumer,”  Richards says. “Use the product: How does it taste, smell, sound, feel in your hands—how does it  perform? Do you understand it? Can you appreciate why other consumers get excited by it? Go on  that consumer journey.”  Once you’ve taken that step, you’ll be able to embark on a successful packaging redesign if that’s  what’s needed. “Many brands successfully update their look and feel on a regular basis with very little  effect on the loyal consumer—that’s the craft of branding,” Richards says. “When you go back and  look at packaging through the ages, especially the power brands that have stood the test of time  through decades of changes and consumer trends, they offer a unique insight of how to develop and  manage key equities and remain relevant to the consumer of today and tomorrow.”       [16­Mar­2009]      Jennifer Gidman lives and works in New York.     Other articles by this author          commenting closed   bookmark   print   suggest topic   recommend ( 91 )   email    Packaging: Lessons from Tropicana’s Fruitless Design        It's amazing to see so many examples such as this, especially considering the money and  reputations involved.One thing I tend to notice is missing is 'end benefit'... TO THE CONSUMER.I am of  course an advocate, so I would say this, but it also seems a pity more thought in these redesigns is not  given to environmental benefits, especially in the area of reuse, which surely can offer END BENEFIT to  person, pocket, planet and.. if marketed well, the product too!And I can think of many that could well  confer significant advantages in this regard, whilst representing an evolution that will satisfy the desire to  stay 'fresh', but without needing to confuse loyal customers by being too radical. Or not working (I hark to the Wal*Mart large bottle 'green' design; which was more to help the logistics than at the breakfast  table... think 'end benefit' again... where was it?) The will is there, the money is there. The imaginations  are there. Wouldn't it be great if the brief was posed?    Peter Martin, Junkk Male, Junkk.com ­ March 16, 2009     Excellent article. Thank you so much Jennifer!It's always the same old story with leading brands.  Evolution or revolution?Research is very very weak for this kind of projects, we are using the same tools  for the last 25 years and definitely the world (the consumer) has changed...All this shouldn't last; but it  will, always...said Prince of Lampedusa.    Jordi Aguilar, Strategy Director, Morillas Brand Design ­ March 16, 2009     Jennifer, Well put! I agree with your conclusion "Perhaps this could have all been avoided if PepsiCo  had sought out real consumer input in the first place." However, while graphic design firms may be the  easiest target for such criticism, they are not alone. Brand consultants, ad agencies and PR firms are all guilty of the same sins whenever their practitioners focus so much on the client, their peers or their ego  that the consumer becomes a trifling afterthought. Thanks for the post. I will encourage my clients and  employees to read this.    Sean Duffy, Brand Consultant, The Duffy Agency ­ March 16, 2009     Funny, I actually sent Tropicana an email about two weeks ago commenting on the new packaging. I  alerted them that it made it difficult for me (a branding professional) to identify my favorite variety (Light  Jeff Gonzalez, Just a Brand Conscious Guy, Freelance Web Marketing ­ March 16, 2009     Thanks for the thorough follow­up and insights on brand management and "consumers as design  critics." I followed this makeover discussion with great interest and was glad to see Tropicana responded by listening to its core customers. But I do worry about the trend of asking consumers to "be the  designer." The pendulum has swung away from respect for the design craft to allowing consumers to  completely run the show. There needs to be a happy medium between consumer input and thoughtful,  meaningful design choices. Tropicana got lucky and learned a bit about redesigning a customer 
  • 4.                 Search always branding. always on.   Latest News In Depth  Papers  Books  Brandcameo  Directory  Careers  Branding Glossary     Tim Zagat  full of opinions  by Jennifer Gidman   You should register for our newsletter March 2, 2009 issue   “Power to the people.” Few brands deliver on that  You should also:   slogan like Zagat Survey, which has been compiling   follow us on Twitter,    user opinions of restaurants and other shopping, hotel  add us on Facebook,  and entertainment venues and publishing the results   join us on LinkedIn,  in popular annual guides for 30 years.   subscribe to our RSS  What Tim Zagat and his wife, Nina, began as a hobby and send us your story ideas at:   is now a portable vox populi with a now­familiar 30­ tips@brandchannel.com   point rating scale for dining and entertainment venues. Tim told us how the Zagat Survey (“the ultimate    elsewhere on brandchannel source on where to ‘Eat, Drink, Stay and Play’”) has  evolved, what makes it an enduring brand, and how he < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 > and his wife still play an integral role in the brand that  bears their name.   It’s your namesake—so how would you define     the Zagat Survey brand? The key factors defining the brand are that the guides    are up to date, fun to read and trustworthy—by being    consistently accurate and fair. There’s a sense that  the guides’ information comes from savvy people who  are, hopefully, like you, and who can share their  experiences to help you make smart decisions.   Packaging Service Brands All Customers Are Irrational Jason Fry Tecnisa Construction Company Branding Airports Where The Wild Things Are Surprising Secret of Successful  Odwalla Will Windows 7 revive Microsoft's  Brands and employees must work  A marketing book about the human  An interview on how to grow a  Why this successful Brazilian  Why branding will take off with  A boy disappears into his  Differentiation Does this fruit drink and smoothie  brand?   Walk us through the Zagat voting process.   together to succeed in such a  subconscious and how it makes us  powerful brand in the routine  company is building both bonds and passengers, airports and the  imagination full of monsters, ideals,  Why effective differentiation means  brand have the right mix of  Join our debate on what brands  cluttered marketplace. behave. sunflower seed category. its brand. brands that travel with them. and Converse brandcameos. thinking beyond the core benefits of  ingredients online? should and shouldn ’t do when  People are asked to vote on food, décor, service and cost for restaurants, and then to comment on  your product category. reacting to shifts in public opinion. the overall dining experience. After these votes are submitted, they are read by our editors (we have  about 50 of them), who synopsize what all the people say. The comments are edited with the goal of  most viewed posts being as fair a synopsis as possible. The numeric ratings you see are simply an average score based MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does  on all the collected responses. Retail   Our goal at Zagat is not to create a paradigm of what a great restaurant or store or spa is. Many  Coke Sends Bloggers On An "Open  people want to tell you what they think is the best restaurant or hotel—to create their own  Happiness" World Tour    paradigm—not what you need to know. Our goal is to help you intelligently decide what you want to  Martha Stewart Brands A Turkey   do and where you want to go. Obamas Give J Crew Some Change  You need different things to satisfy your needs from day to day, from a quick late­night dinner nearby  They Can Believe In   with your spouse to entertaining a sophisticated business client. The brand’s goal is to facilitate you  Phillies' Rise Mirrors Philly's Rise    making smart decisions to serve your best interests. If you go to a restaurant that’s a “28/28/28” in  our book, however, you probably are going to a restaurant that gets three stars in the Michelin Guide. recent posts Has the voting system ever been compromised? Any other challenges in maintaining brand  Citizens And Capital One Bank On  integrity? Starbucks And Dunkin' Donuts  If we’re not accurate and fair, it’s pretty easy for people to figure it out. Our whole business and all  Awkward Timing For Tom Ford's  our credibility depends on the quality of the reviews we write. Return To Womenswear  Read the reviews of restaurants that you frequent most. Ask yourself whether they’re accurate. If so,  Headline Roundup: Android Army  you conclude that the system—the brand—works. If not, you ought to throw the book out. Our New  Around The Web: Confirm Friend  York City restaurant guide, though, has probably been the best ­selling book of any kind in NYC for  Request  the last ten years, which I think says something about our reliability. MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does  Retail  If there are large numbers of people going to a restaurant or hotel before you, it’s hard for us to make  a mistake after we’ve read all the comments before we write a synopsis. That’s true even if people  disagree. Let’s say a place is a real hot spot: a 20­year­old will say, “Lively and exciting”; his parents   Will Starbuck's Via instant coffee  may say, “Crowded and noisy.” You get those results fairly often, but both viewpoints are useful.  undermine the brand? So some of the restaurants have been upset about their ratings? j k l m n No Relatively few. When someone has a factual issue, we’ll try to correct it as quickly as possible, 
  • 5. MS Mall 1.0: Microsoft Finally Does  Retail  If there are large numbers of people going to a restaurant or hotel before you, it’s hard for us to make  a mistake after we’ve read all the comments before we write a synopsis. That’s true even if people  disagree. Let’s say a place is a real hot spot: a 20­year­old will say, “Lively and exciting”; his parents   Will Starbuck's Via instant coffee  may say, “Crowded and noisy.” You get those results fairly often, but both viewpoints are useful.  undermine the brand? So some of the restaurants have been upset about their ratings? j k l m n No Relatively few. When someone has a factual issue, we’ll try to correct it as quickly as possible,  because we’re covering 40,000 restaurants, and we want to make sure the guide is factually correct.  j k l m n If it’s a matter of opinion, however, we don’t make changes.  Yes To be honest, most restaurateurs like what we do much more than they like one critic coming in.  VOTE     After all, a critic’s job is to be critical. The regular people who submit reviews to our guides generally  Show Results are going out to have a good time, so, by and large, their reviews are more positive. If the guides have a fault, it may be they’re too nice.  Polls Archive  Do you think the Zagat guides have helped consumers receive better service? After all, a  restaurant must now treat every customer as if he or she is rating it. Ruth Reichl, then the New York Times restaurant critic, visited Le Cirque two nights in a row: the first in disguise, the second as her recognizable self. She then contrasted the service she received those  nights, concluding that the Dubuque tourist visiting a Manhattan restaurant won’t eat as well as the  urbane regular. Frankly, we believe (we hope) that we’re influencing the restaurants for the better, in that way and in  one other way: we try to get the restaurants to understand they are getting a free market review from  their customers. Every time a restaurant owner looks at a review, it’s his customers who are rating  his restaurant and reviewing them. What if your restaurant gets a 23 for food and a 16 for service— what does that tell you? It tells you that the same people who raved about the food don’t think the  service is as good. If the restaurant cares about what its customers think, it ought to be spending  some time trying to work on its service. We’ve also given the consumer a sense of empowerment they didn’t have 30 years ago. Back then,  there were a few great “expert” restaurant critics, and the rest of us had to keep quiet.  Talk about your brand extensions. You started out with restaurant guides and then moved  on to other ratings. We do surveys for hotels, resorts, nightlife, movies and shopping, which we do in 25 cities. We even  do two kinds of shopping in NY: one features gourmet food and entertaining, and the other focuses on retail. We do a nightlife survey in 25 cities—our older son had once told us that he felt his friends  went out to drink more than they eat, so we figured that was a good direction to go in. Of course, I  always hoped his metabolism would revert back to eating instead of drinking. We haven’t done many brand partnerships, however. I’m old­fashioned: I think we should just do what we do as well as possible and not try to confuse the brand by getting involved in things that people  don’t think is our natural territory.  How do you decide where to open a guide? We have people who spend time thinking about those things—I have a tendency of wanting to try  things, and if they work, they work, if they don’t, they don’t. So far we’ve had a good track record of  them working! We’ll have more focused guides to complement the main guide. For instance, we have a San  Francisco guide, with a smaller guide for Napa and Sonoma. And here in New York, for example,  we’re reaching out to support the city of Newark —they have a wonderful new mayor, and that’s part  of why we’re doing it. We have a guide for Brooklyn and for Staten Island, even though they’re all  technically part of New York City. We did a guide for lower Manhattan after 9/11 that was designed to bring back business to downtown. Where do you see the Zagat brand moving in the next decade or so? We just did three cities in China, and we’re talking to people in a number of foreign countries about  expanding into those. China has about 50 or 60 cities with more than the population of Chicago, and  we’re not going to be able to do it by ourselves, so we’re trying to get somebody to work with us in  China under our supervision. How are you and your wife, Nina, still involved in the day­to­day operations of the brand? We’re fully involved. We do different things—I tend to work more on the creative, editorial side and  [am] somewhat more media­oriented. She’s very articulate and smarter than I am in a lot of ways (we met in law school, so we’ve been at it for a long time). She’s more involved in the day­to­day running  of the business. But if there’s a serious issue or big discussion, we’ll both get involved.  Sometimes we’ll argue about issues—but one of the best things about arguing with someone who’s a part of your family is that we have the same ultimate goal: we want the guide to be the best possible  guide there is. There are no politics involved in disagreeing. If she says one thing, and I say another,  at least we both know we’re trying to get to the same place. There are no separate agendas—it’s just a difference of opinion, which is sometimes very useful.  What’s it like sharing the brand name with your family name? Is it a little weird?  Not really, because I’m just so used to it. It seems perfectly natural. I didn’t even know what a brand  was when we started—people started telling me 20 years ago that I was a brand, and I would say,  “What’s a brand?”  How do you pronounce “Zagat,” anyway? Has the continual mispronunciation of the name  affected the brand in any way? It’s “Za­GAT like the cat in a hat, and that’s that!” It hasn’t really affected our success one way or the 
  • 6. What’s it like sharing the brand name with your family name? Is it a little weird?  Not really, because I’m just so used to it. It seems perfectly natural. I didn’t even know what a brand  was when we started—people started telling me 20 years ago that I was a brand, and I would say,  “What’s a brand?”  How do you pronounce “Zagat,” anyway? Has the continual mispronunciation of the name  affected the brand in any way? It’s “Za­GAT like the cat in a hat, and that’s that!” It hasn’t really affected our success one way or the  other. It’s an unusual name—no one else in the whole country has it. It happens to have a nice five  letters—it’s a neat name for a brand. If our name was “Schnitzerbocker,” you’d have to turn the guide  on its side to fit it all in. So, since you’re based in Manhattan, what’s your favorite restaurant? Will we catch you at  Gray’s Papaya, the New York City hotdog institution?  You will see me there, but you’ll also find me at a lot of other places. I like to go to different  restaurants on different nights. I probably wouldn’t want to go to my favorite French restaurant every  day—my liver would likely explode. Some nights I’m in the mood for Chinese, sometimes Italian.  But restaurants I like aren’t the point of the Zagat brand. Whose opinion would you rather base your  decision on: 38,000 people’s, or Tim Zagat’s? We run the voting machine and the election system;  we don’t believe you should have a candidate in the race run the election. You have to be objective,  unbiased, neutral. Pushing restaurants we like on everyone else would be contrary to everything we  stand for. When you do that, you’re saying that one person’s voice is better than any other’s.        Jennifer Gidman lives and works in New York.  Other articles by this author     commenting closed   bookmark   print   suggest topic   recommend ( 149 )   email    Tim Zagat ­ full of opinions        I juts got my Zagat dating and dumping guide and I LOVE IT!    Joe ­ March 16, 2009        2009  |  2008  |  2007  |  2006  |  2005  |  2004  |  2003  |  2002  |   brandchannel careers archive   2001      Oct 9, 2009  Jason Fry ­ cooking up a brand ­­ Abram Sauer        Jason Fry grows branding power in sunflower seeds.                Aug 31, 2009  Herman Mashaba ­ just being himself ­­ Mandy de Waal        How Herman Mashaba built an African megabrand.                Aug 3, 2009  Jose Eduardo Costas ­ jet setter ­­ Preeti Khicha        The sky is the limit for Jose Costas.                Jul 6, 2009  Dan Aykroyd ­ wines and laughs ­­ Reneé Alexander        Dan Aykroyd uncorks his wine brand.                Jun 1, 2009  Lee Zalben ­ spreading his brand around ­­ Anthony Zumpano        Peanut Butter & Co. sticks to brand values.                May 4, 2009  Renzo Rosso ­ the engine behind diesel ­­ Slaven Marinovic        Diesel—one leg at a time.                Mar 30, 2009  Margie Bailly ­ branding behind the scenes ­­ Abram Sauer        A cool focus on a cold brand.                Feb 2, 2009  Mohan Sivanand ­ has lots to digest ­­ Preeti Khicha        The story behind the editor of Reader’s Digest India.                Jan 5, 2009  Gerry Dee ­ stands up ­­ Reneé Alexander        The serious business of comedy brands.                RSS   | Privacy Policy | About Us | Contact Us | FAQ  Copyright  ©  2001­2009 brandchannel. All rights reserved.  
  • 7.                              Founded in 1869 by Henry John Heinz, the Heinz brand rules the     ketchup market (registered sales reached US$ 267.1 million in 2005)  and has achieved a 60 percent share of the category. ConAgra,     maker of second­place Hunt’s ketchup, trailed behind with a 16     percent share during the same period, while Del Monte barely made     a blip with 5.3 percent—falling even behind private­label brands  which had a 17 percent share. The Heinz name has achieved iconic status and become one of  those rare brands that single­handedly drive a category. A study  done on the brand in 2005 by The New England Consulting Group    estimated the lifetime brand value for Heinz at more than US$ 20  billion. Heinz ranked first in a 2008 overall brand equity study from  EquiTrend, which evaluated more than 1,000 brands across 39  categories. "I do think Heinz does have a quality product,” says Andrew F.  Smith, author of Pure Ketchup: A History of America's National  Condiment. “It's very sticky; I don't like ketchup that drips off a French fry. Their  ketchup is slow, which is what their commercials promoted in the 1960s and 1970s. It  has a high viscosity, so it sticks to whatever you put it on —if you bite into a hamburger  or hot dog, it doesn’t squish out the other end. People see that quality and have brand  loyalty. It's a great story not many commercial products have.”   Most consumers rely on trusty Heinz 57 to perk up their hamburger patties, but who is  buying the number­two and number­three brands? And why? “It’s mainly price,” says  Smith. “The Hunt's and Del Monte varieties have a lower price point than Heinz." The  Packaged Facts report backs up his assertion: people with household incomes greater  than US$ 100,000 are more likely to use Heinz, while Hunt's is the most often ­used  ketchup brand in households with incomes less than US$ 20,000. Viscous Visibility So, with such one­sided dominance in the category, what type of marketing is  necessary for the top brand, as well as for its distant competitors? "When you're controlling 60 percent of the market, why innovate?" laughs Smith. “Heinz  controls the commercial ketchup market in ways that no one else can compete with.  Once you get to that point, it doesn't matter if Del Monte and Hunt's advertise their  ketchups—Heinz sales actually go up when they do that!"  Most of the marketing and advertising initiatives that  have cropped up in recent years have revolved around  packaging innovations. In 2002, Heinz and ConAgra both  launched their inverted squeeze ketchup bottles—the  Heinz Easy Squeeze and Hunt's Perfect Squeeze—in the  same week. Heinz continued pioneering in packaging with its Top­ Down and Fridge Door Fit bottles. They reached out to 
  • 8. Most of the marketing and advertising initiatives that  have cropped up in recent years have revolved around  packaging innovations. In 2002, Heinz and ConAgra both  launched their inverted squeeze ketchup bottles—the  Heinz Easy Squeeze and Hunt's Perfect Squeeze—in the  same week. Heinz continued pioneering in packaging with its Top­ Down and Fridge Door Fit bottles. They reached out to  younger consumers as well, with Silly Squirts bottles,  designed with different nozzles to let little hands create  their own dinnertime concoctions. The company also    launched a “Create­A­Label” campaign where consumers  could visit Heinz.com to create customized messages, as  well as the "Top This” TV challenge that allowed users to  compete to create the next Heinz TV commercial. Hunt’s has tried to keep up in the bottle wars by jumping on the green bandwagon: its  46­ounce bottle recently won an Institute of Packaging Professionals’ sustainable  packaging award for its DiamondClear PET construction, which Hunt’s claims makes the  bottle 12 percent lighter and more environmentally friendly than Heinz bottles of the  same size. Other recent ConAgra promotions designed to gain visibility for the brand have included  its role as an exclusive food sponsor for Six Flags, Inc., which put Hunt’s ketchup front  and center on every theme­park fast­food platter to enhance brand loyalty and reach  out to consumers beyond traditional media. The Hunt’s brand also took the unusual step  of offering "taste guarantee certificates " to consumers: anyone not satisfied with the  brand’s new, thicker ketchup can opt for a full cash refund or swap the certificates for a US$ 20 discount on other ConAgra product purchases. Sticky Situations Ketchup’s reputation as the untouchable topper, however, has not gone unchallenged.  There was the "salsa scare,"which, depending on which report you’re reading, has seen  salsa and ketchup alternate as the number­one condiment in the US. The nature of the product itself has seen little change over the years, and ketchup  continues to tickle the palate by appealing to all five of the basic taste receptors on the tongue: salty, sweet, sour, bitter and umami—a savory sensation triggered by glutamic  amino acid.  With the exception of Heinz’s ill­fated colored ketchups that didn’t quite catch on with    the kid demographic, as well as a Hot & Spicy Heinz ketchup that hasn’t given the  brand the extra kick that was expected, the only other recent brand extensions within  this category—Heinz’s organic ketchup and Hunt’s no­salt added—are focusing on  health benefits. Ketchup contains lycopene, a nutrient that has been linked to staving off some cancers and other diseases, and the recent brand extensions seem to be an attempt to appeal  to an increasingly health­conscious public. Sixty­six percent of consumers say that  they eat organic foods at least occasionally, according to the Organic Trade  Association (OTA). Smith isn't buying the organic angle, however. "It won't catch on,” he  asserts. “Heinz was worried with salsa, so they made a salsa ketchup  [in 1993 that was eventually discontinued].”   Expanding Markets Despite failed brand extensions and competition from more culturally  influenced condiments, Smith doesn’t see a decline in the ketchup  category coming anytime soon—and he looks to local food markets as    proof. “There are a huge number of designer ketchups,” he says. “If I go into a gourmet food  store here in New York, I’ll find ten or 15 different types of ketchup. It’s not just the  basic three. Restaurants are also serving fresh ketchup that they’re making themselves. I think that shows the vibrancy of the category—it’s an exciting field that hasn’t grown stagnant.”  Furthermore, there is an international market for the condiment. In other countries, as  Smith documents in his book, ketchup is used on anything from pasta (Holland and  Venezuela) to cabbage rolls (Japan) and meatballs and fishballs (Sweden). “The  formulas could also be different, depending on location,” he says. “They change based  on local needs." Kraft Foods, for example, produces curry­ and paprika­flavored  ketchups in Europe, says Smith. With that level of international appeal, ketchup is poised to become a respected  ingredient instead of a panacea for bland dishes. And, as with salt and mustard,  ketchup is gaining notoriety in the gourmet market, which may have Heinz seeing red.       [17­Nov­2008]
  • 9.      Jennifer Gidman uses OJ as a breakfast supplement every morning and as an  indispensable ingredient in her mixology experiments every Friday night.     Other articles by this author          commenting closed   bookmark   print   suggest topic   recommend ( 43 )   email    The Squeeze on Ketchup      market leader(s), no matter how large and dominant they are, should they choose to  cut and slow innovation, that is when their foothold will start shaking. I got to say, life is tough, you need not only grow up but to keep on growing or the other  kids on the block will start bigger and bigger. innovation= business continuity.    Raziel, full time brand junkie/part time corporate sales ­ November 15, 2008     A few years ago I saw a TV documentary about the history of the Heinz company. After learning about their devotion to sanitation and their progressive policies for their workers,  I have been a loyal Heinz consumer.    Tom Brown, retired journalist ­ November 17, 2008     Raziel makes a good point regarding innovation = business continuity.  Let’s look at one startling point that was stated in the article: “people with household  incomes greater than US$ 100,000 are more likely to use Heinz, while Hunt's is the most  often­used ketchup brand in households with incomes less than US$ 20,000.” Can Heinz  take advantage of this data, and generate an offering that has some appeal to the under  $20k household (other than price point)? What is resonating with this group? Are there  emotional considerations when ketchup is purchased? By sitting back and not innovating,  Heinz may be missing an opportunity here to increase their stronghold on the category.    Dave, Marketing Communications, Michelin ­ November 17, 2008     I am a Heinz devotee but was sad to hear nothing about whether they are using  recycled materials for their bottles while Hunt's is doing so. Come on Heinz. Make me  proud.    ­ November 17, 2008     When you're this big you can leak from above and below. Above is the gourmet market.  People looking for the "fleur de sel" of red condiments are unlikely to go to any exotic new  product with the Heinz name on it ­ they'll want something from someone different. And  below: when I worked in restaurants I remember seeing staff refill Heinz bottles from  industrial cans of generic ketchup. This eventually cuts the 'sticky' product quality out  from under the name and the brand becomes more like a label. These, of course, are not  the worst kind of problems to have when you own the big 60 in the middle.    Paul Belserene, Senior Strategic Storyteller, Envisioning and Storytelling ­ November 17, 2008    view all comments     2009  | 2008  |  2007  |   2006  |   brandchannel home archive  2005  |   2004  |   2003  |   2002  |   2001    Dec 22, 2008  Brand Darwinism: When & Why Brands Falter & Die       Where brands go when they die.        Dec 15, 2008  M.H. Alshaya Co.: Paving the Way in Emerging Markets ­­  Mya Frazier       Alshaya offers brands direction in the Middle East.        Dec 8, 2008  Branding by the Nose in Brazil ­­  Ana Paula Palombo Terzi       Brazilian brands take a nose dive.        Dec 1, 2008  Wines: Is ''Made in France'' Enough? ­­  Joe Ray       French wine brands pour on uniqueness.        Nov 24, 2008  German Engineering Drives Global Brand Success ­­  Barry Silverstein       How German brands deliver discipline and quality.        Nov 10, 2008  Abu Dhabi: A City Rich in Branding ­­  Mya Frazier       The brand strategy behind the world's richest city. 
  • 10.                    Barack Obama  clicks with voters?  by Jennifer Gidman   February 25, 2008  issue     And then there were three:  McCain, Hillary, and Barack. While  John McCain has safely locked up  the Republican Party's presidential candidate nomination, the  Democrats are still involved in a  battle between two tenacious  hopefuls who refuse to back  down: Hillary Clinton and Barack  Obama.    The brand that Obama’s camp is trying to sell isn’t difficult to nail down: He’s a  Washington interloper with fresh ideas (a trait that has become his liability as well as his    main selling point). He’s user­friendly and approachable—the type of guy you could  discuss critical issues with at a black­tie gala one evening, and mix a guacamole dip with  at a Super Bowl bash the next.  Obama also personifies the cutting­edge and tech­savvy candidate, with a deep  understanding of how to maximize today’s multimedia to communicate with his core  demographic. Here is where the Barack Obama website comes into play, extending his  brand to countless Internet political junkies who can surf to their hearts ’ content about  where he actually stands on the issues.  The site’s welcome mat features Barack, his wife, and two children, sitting arm­in­arm  under a slogan that reads "Change We Can Believe In." This page doesn’t come without  strings; before you’re taken to the home page, you’re faced down by the obligatory “fill­     in­your­email­and­zipcode­here­so­we­can­bombard­you­with­propaganda” signup  screen. (This, of course, is a common tactic employed by his competitors throughout the  quest for the Democratic, and Republican, nomination.)  The real branding and reaching out begins on the home page, which offers a countdown  to the campaign's goal of "One Million People Who Own This Campaign," a "State of the  Race" map, "Make a Difference" and "Next Up" sections, and six drop­down menus: Learn,  Issues, Media, Action, People, and States. There is even a BarackTV section that    features video clips from his speeches. Otherwise, the home page is dedicated to  breaking news, speaking engagements, and a detailed map of the US, broken down state­ by­state, encouraging visitors to click on "Where do you live" so they can become more  involved in local, grassroots politiking for Obama.  The Get Involved area highlights a place to donate, volunteer,  and register to vote. You can even sign up for "Camp Obama,"  a two­day training session that will indoctrinate you into the  Obama family and help you organize your own community to  support Barack. I even received my very own dinner invitation  from the unseen Obama Webmastercontingent, of course, on  my making a small donation and being one of the three average  citizens selected to attend. Devotees can also download icons  and logos to support the Obama mission (though organizers  probably could have come up with something a little more exciting than an “I’m Caucusing for Barack Obama” site widget).  Of course, Obama’s biggest challenge (besides his junior­politician status) has been trying to convince the American populace that he isn’t all sparkle and no substance. His site  would be prime real estate to really push his perspective on important issues, but while  the main nav bar links to an extensive section that contains detailed blueprints for  everything from improving our schools to protecting our borders, Obama’s team doesn’t    capitalize on this online opportunity to really put the issues front and center.  A political    website, like a political campaign, must be organized, informational, and motivational.  Barack's website offers all three of these components, but it remains to be seen if the  necessary balance is struck to most effectively promote the message, issues, and  constituents that comprise the Obama brand. 
  • 11. To comparison shop, check out Hillary Clinton's website and John McCain's website as  well. Also, for a comprehensive look at the 2008 nominee hopefuls and their brands, visit  a study of the 2008 presidential candidates as consumer brands created by two South  Carolina firms, Chernoff Newman and Market Search. In this self­proclaimed intellectual  exercise, the firms ask such questions as: Are political candidates knowingly and  proactively setting forth to build their brand? And are the public’s perceptions of  candidates in sync with the attributes candidates are espousing in their advertising, press releases, and appearances?  And, of course, don't forget to vote.    Jennifer Gidman uses OJ as a breakfast supplement every morning and as an  indispensable ingredient in her mixology experiments every Friday night.  Other articles by this author  *Due to the constantly changing environment of websites, some reviews may no longer reflect the current  website for this brand.    commenting closed   bookmark   print   suggest topic   recommend ( 38 )   email    brandchannel webwatch    2009  | 2008  |  2007  |   2006  |   2005  |   2004  |   2003  |   2002  |   archive  2001      Dec 22, 2008  Nestlé’s Everyday Milk ­ dairy intimate ­­  Umair Naeem     Everyday milks tea time in Pakistan.          Dec 15, 2008  Brill ­ cutting it online? ­­  Abram Sauer     Brill is sharp online.          Dec 8, 2008  Femina ­ fashionable? ­­  Preeti Khicha     How Femina clicks with Indian women.          Dec 1, 2008  Cricinfo ­ fan friendly? ­­  Umair Naeem     Cricinfo swings at the future.          Nov 24, 2008  bumGenius.com ­ sensitive? ­­  Abram Sauer     Does this website dispose of diaper confusion?          Nov 17, 2008  SmartNow.com ­ resourceful? ­­  Abram Sauer     What is the future of SmartNow.com?          Nov 10, 2008  Campbell's Soup ­ un­canny ­­  Abram Sauer     Why Campbell's Soup is good for the online soul.          Nov 3, 2008  Arsenal ­ homepage advantage ­­  Preeti Khicha     This website needs a kick in the grass.          Oct 27, 2008  Cathay Pacific Airways ­ cabin fever ­­  Shashank Nigam     Cathay Pacific Airways takes flight online.          Oct 20, 2008  Flip Video ­ sleek ­­  Abram Sauer     Can Flip Video zoom in on online shoppers?          Oct 13, 2008  Asian Paints ­ a­peeling? ­­  Preeti Khicha     Can Asian Paints brush aside online competition?          Oct 6, 2008  Scholastic StudyJams ­ brain candy ­­  Alycia de Mesa     Why Scholastic StudyJams rocks online.          Sep 29, 2008  Incredible India ­ too spicy? ­­  Preeti Khicha     Indian culture spices up this dynamic website          Sep 22, 2008  Pottery Barn ­ home coming ­­  Vivian Manning­Schaffel     Does Pottery Barn's website sit well with the brand?          Sep 15, 2008  British Monarchy ­ rules ­­  Anthony Zumpano     Is the British Monarchy's website a royal pain?          Sep 8, 2008  Charmin ­ main squeeze ­­  Abram Sauer     Charmin's website offers a load of information.          Sep 1, 2008  Canadian Museum for Human Rights ­ ground breaking? ­­  Renée Alexander     CMHR goes online to give tragic history a new life.       
  • 12. enter keyword(s) or titles Photography  • Product Reviews  • How­tos • News • Techniques for Professional Photographers, Photofinishers, & Retailers    Studio Photography PTN Home News Magazines Techniques Reviews Online Exclusives Buyer's Guide Book Store Community Classified Subscribe Home » Studio Photography  » July 2008 Issue  » Magazine Article  More from Studio Photography   More from The July 2008 Issue   More from Jennifer Gidman   yourname@domain  Most Read  |   Most E­mailed  |  E­mail Article  |  Print Article  | Save Article  | License Article      eNewsletter Archive Adventures in Fine Art  What a niche: When he's not at the ends of the earth on an icebreaker, David Schultz is manning his fine art gallery,  selling limited­edition prints.  Don't ever try to steal a fur seal's woman ­just ask David Schultz.  The wildlife, landscape, and nature photographer, based in Park City, Utah, has  had some close calls during his photography tenure, but it was on one of his  polar expeditions to South Georgia Island where man came face to face with a  ferocious (and territorial) beast.  "The beaches here at this time of year are breeding grounds for fur seals," he  explains. "All of the bulls are staking out their territory and trying to keep other  bulls from coming ashore. They're usually confronting each other right at the  water's edge. On one particular trip, I was photographing some penguins with  my back to the surf, and this very large fur seal came charging up right out of a  © David Schultz   wave. I didn't see it until Woody, one of the other expedition members,  shouted, 'David, look out!' I didn't even have to look­I just dove. The seal went  on a rampage and smashed my video camera­I guess my backside looked like  competition! Needless to say, I ended up buying a lot of beers for Woody during  PTN Dailes HERE that voyage." Despite this brush with death ­by­fur­seal, Schultz continues to venture to  glacier­dotted tundras and other landscapes for his compelling imagery, which  he then uses to line the walls as limited ­edition prints at his Utah gallery. A Teen Dream Becomes Reality Schultz's photography career got its serendipitous start when he was  diagnosed with diabetes as a teenager. "I guess if I hadn't become a diabetic, I  never would have picked up a camera and probably never would have become a  photographer," he says. "There was a big concern in the back of my mind of  losing my vision at some point in my later years, so I wanted to at least have  the memories. When I got out of high school, I would take off for a few months  at a time and just drive around to see what was out there. I picked up a camera    somewhere along the way." © David Schultz   After meeting up with a pro photographer during a trip to Ruby Beach in  Washington State when he was 19, Schultz decided he wanted to be a  photographer. "It took many years ­I was all self ­taught," he says. "I left  Michigan and went to Dallas in 1980 and got into commercial photography,  shooting primarily fashion and lifestyle work. I built up a clientele, and after  about seven years of that, I came out to Utah on an assignment for a resort. I  just fell in love with the area, and a month later I moved out here." Schultz had figured on continuing in the fashion/lifestyle genre in Utah, perhaps  geared more toward the resort/sports industries, but that wasn't the plan life  had in store for him. "There were a lot of people out here already doing that;  the field was saturated with landscape images as well," he explains. "Plus,  while I enjoyed the fashion work and the people I was working with, it really  © David Schultz   wasn't what I was cut out for. I didn't have the personality or the drive."  Utah's spectacular landscapes were also partly to "blame" for Schultz's switch.  "It's an incredible region," he says. "Utah has some of the most diverse and 
  • 13. Utah's spectacular landscapes were also partly to "blame" for Schultz's switch.  "It's an incredible region," he says. "Utah has some of the most diverse and  dramatic terrain [of] anywhere I've been. You've got the change of seasons,  you've got the mountains, the wildlife, the salt flats; within a six ­hour drive, I  can be in 10 different national parks. It's a pretty special place." The seed of an idea for a fine ­art gallery was planted after a visit to Robert  © David Schultz   Redford's Sundance Resort, located about 10 miles from Schultz's house. "One  day I was at the resort in one of the gift shops, trying to figure out a way to  market my images," he recalls. "I spoke to the manager of the gift shop and  asked her if I could put some framed images up on easels on their beautiful  deck. It had a gorgeous backdrop, with a creek running by, mountains in the  background, and all the autumn colors [in full bloom]. It was the perfect  landscape for what I was trying to sell." Schultz did extremely well in sales that weekend and started approaching other  local resorts with the same exhibition idea. "After a couple of years of doing  these outdoor exhibits and realizing I didn't like having to deal with the sudden  change of weather (you don't want to have your images ruined by a sudden  downpour!), I decided to open up the gallery on Main Street in Park City," he  says. While he acknowledges there are other photographers who have ventured  down the limited ­edition­print path, Schultz tries to differentiate himself from the  pack. "I wouldn't say there are a lot of photographers doing what I'm doing, but    right here on Main Street in Park City, there are four nature ­photography  © David Schultz   galleries," he says. "You have to take it to a different level, with both the quality  and the personal connection ­people are always surprised when they call the  gallery and discover I'm the actual photographer. The work also far exceeds  what you'll often find in most photography galleries. I decided early on that I  was going to stick with a very high­quality print and do a number of them signed  with museum matte board. Everything is archival, and we use a lot of frames  imported from Italy with beautiful woods. The other part of my little niche is the  images themselves. My style is trying to find really vivid colors and scenes and  getting it in the right light to bring those things out." Into the Wild Schultz stays busy during the wintertime at the gallery ("I'm basically in the  gallery from before Christmas through Easter without a day off.") In the spring  and in the fall is when Schultz sets out for faraway climes. "A lot of my work recently has been in the Arctic and Antarctic polar regions," he  says. "I'll be returning to Antarctica in October to photograph emperor  penguins ­my fourth trip down there. We'll be on an icebreaker ­an entirely    different class of ship." © David Schultz   He began his ventures into the deep freeze as a passenger. "I made the right  contacts with the expedition company that leases the ship; they brought me on  several voyages into the Scandinavian Arctic," he says. "This will be my third trip  with them as a guest lecturer on the voyages into Antarctica. I don't get paid for  it, but when you figure a voyage like that is like $20,000...plus, you have a little  more flexibility than the other passengers might. You know the staff and might  help with the launching and landing of the zodiacs (the rubber rafts) and such. If  you want to head over to a certain iceberg, you might have a better chance of  talking the driver into it!" Planning for such a photographic adventure requires backups, sturdy gear, and  some good old ­fashioned common sense. "If a wave's coming, you duck and  cover!" he laughs. "I had a video camera that was full of saltwater; it still  © David Schultz   worked until that fur seal smashed it." Having extra supplies is key. "You're down there for six, seven weeks," he  explains. "It's hard, because you already are bringing so much gear to stay dry  and warm, but it's not like there's an Adorama or a B&H Photo along the way!" Schultz recommends packing extra UV filters for your lenses, battery chargers,  and even the right adapters. "Digital photography is both a good and bad thing,  because now you have five pounds of power cords and rechargers and stuff like  that, and then you have to make sure you have the right adapters (for a  Russian ship on top of that)," he says. "But after going a few times, I can easily  © David Schultz   pack in a couple of hours to go on that type of trip." Keep Your Eye on the Mandible... As anyone who's seen The March of the Penguins can attest, setting foot among  these dorsal darlings can be exhilarating, suspenseful, and even humorous. "It's 
  • 14. Keep Your Eye on the Mandible... As anyone who's seen The March of the Penguins can attest, setting foot among  these dorsal darlings can be exhilarating, suspenseful, and even humorous. "It's  absolutely hilarious when you land on some of these beaches and you've got  200,000 penguins around you," Schultz explains. "They come right down to the  zodiacs. You're just in the middle of all this noise and chaos; then you throw in  some three ­ton elephant seals duking it out, and a bunch of angry fur seals.  That's the big thing with wildlife­it's right in your face." © David Schultz   For his up­close­and ­personal encounters, Schultz often uses telephoto lenses  to isolate a scene. "When there are a couple hundred thousand penguins,  trying to find a shot in that chaos is the difficult part," he says. "You watch their  patterns and try to find the couple that may end up entwining their necks. Or  maybe one adult with all the woolies (the big, brown, puffy king penguin chicks)  gathered around it." Schultz relies a lot on his 80 ­400mm Nikkor VR lens. "It's a perfect range for this  type of work­things change so quickly that if I were trying to switch cameras or  lenses, I'd miss it," he says. "And when you're out shooting on a zodiac, you're  bouncing around; very seldom is it calm. Having a vibration­reduction or image­ stabilization lens is very helpful. The 80 ­400 is very sharp ­it's just that you have  to be diligent with it." Looking for a story or a bit of trademark humor in every scene helps Schultz  © David Schultz   compose his shots. "Rather than trying to get a nice portrait of an animal, I try  to capture their personalities," he says. "If I can come up with a real nice caption of an image in a heartbeat, then I know I've done what I was trying to do." As an example, he cites a visit he took to the Grytviken whaling station on South Georgia Island, where Sir Ernest Shackleton is  buried. "There was this old pipe sticking out of an embankment, and a little drizzle of water was coming out of the pipe," he recalls. "A baby elephant seal (we call them wieners) was right under the stream of water playing in it, just twirling around with his mouth  open. All these passengers from the ship were walking by, and here was this incredibly fun scene; everybody else was looking at  the church. Part of my job is to get people involved with the scenery, so I did bring the seal to a couple of people's attention. Then  an Arctic tern landed on the end of a pipe; one of my favorite shots is the expression on this baby elephant seal's face. It had  these giant eyes that were just mesmerized by this tern, who was just perched on the end of the pipe, screeching at him."  Photographing polar bears has also become a passion for Schultz. "They have such incredible personalities," he says. "[You'll see  them] sparring and doing somersaults and just being themselves. I get people all the time who come into the gallery and ask, 'So,  are they friendly?' I'll pull out one of the claws, or the museum ­quality replica of a polar bear skull to show them. That's another fun part of the job: educating people when they come in and see the images and relating the stories behind them. Kids love when  they can wrap the jaws of an 1,800­pound polar bear skull around their heads!"  Lighting for these types of photographs, be they landscapes or wildlife, needs to be spot ­on­something his gallery customers don't always understand right off the bat. "People will come into the gallery and see this mountain scene on my wall that's just got  amazing light in it and perfect autumn conditions with wildflowers, and they want me to come out and photograph their resort or  their new development here in Utah," he says. "They don't understand that some shots have taken me four years of going back to  the same spot over and over again to finally capture it in that nice light. I can quote them a day rate and tell them I have no idea  how long it will take. I could go out there every morning for a week and have lousy light. I avoid that as much as possible."  In fact, less­than ­ideal lighting has prevented many a shot from being taken. "It's more often that I don't take a shot than I do  because of how critical I am about the lighting conditions," he says. "When I only have a very limited amount of wall space, if I  can't capture something better than what I already have, it's one of those things where I'll mark it on the calendar and go back to  the same place next year." And it's not just having that revered early­morning or late­evening light. "Yes, that's typically going to be better light, just because  you get longer shadows and warmer light," Schultz concedes. "But I've got some shots that were shot in the middle of the  afternoon; there was a storm going through and I had little pockets of light coming through the clouds, highlighting the little  homestead in the middle of a yellow canola field." Schultz is currently trying to market a book project based on his Antarctic and Arctic travels. "It's still a work in progress," he says.  "I'm trying to find a publisher; I'll even self­publish if it comes down to that. It wasn't my goal initially to do a book ­after reading a  book about Sir Ernest Shackleton and the Endurance expedition, and seeing the photography that Frank Hurley came back with, I  knew I had to go down and see this place, experience it. I feel like the images I've captured are some of my best work; hopefully a publisher will agree."  He also can't deny the excitement inherent in traveling to distant tundras. "To experience it firsthand, to try to land on Elephant  Island­we've made three attempts so far and still haven't been able to," he says. "We've hiked the last leg of Shackleton's trip on  South Georgia Island a couple of times, and one of my cameras actually got smashed on Sir Ernest Shackleton's gravestone on my  first voyage. That was an interesting insurance claim!" For more of Schultz's work, go to www.westlight.net DAVID SCHULTZ'S TOP BUSINESS TIPS 1. Use your website as a necessary marketing tool. "It's easy to update  immediately, as opposed to a print catalog (which I also have)." 2. Consider a guestbook in your gallery. "I encourage people to sign my 
  • 15. guestbook whenever they come into the gallery; that way, if I have any new  releases, a special edition of a certain image, or a sale, I can send out an email  to direct people to my website." 3. Check out alternate venues. "I would like to open up a couple of other  galleries. This is a seasonal area; if you have a real bad winter, you're going to  be hurting for the rest of the year. So I'm trying to open up a gallery in another  location that's more of a summer clientele." 4. Don't be heavy ­handed with the post ­production finessing. "I pretty much stick  with what I could do in a traditional darkroom, but to a much finer degree,  including dodging and burning, color correcting, etc. I'm not going in to insert a  penguin on top of a polar bear!" David Schultz's Gear Box CAMERAS/LENSES Nikon D2X bodies  Nikon F100 bodies   Nikkor lenses: 200­400mm VR­AF; 80­200mm f2.8D ED; 80­400mm f4.5 AF­VR; 24­85mm f2.8 DX IF­ED; 12­24mm f4G IF­ED;  20mm; 24mm f/2.8; 28mm; 105mm macro; 180mm f/2.8 Nikkor TC­14E II teleconverter  Hasselblad XPan   Canon HG10 HD video camera   ACCESSORIES Really Right Stuff BH­55 ballhead   Acratech GV2, V2, and Ultimate ballheads   Gitzo GT­1530 tripod  Manfrotto 055XWNB Wilderness tripod  Manfrotto 680B monopod   L.L. Rue Groofwin window support   Kinesis SafariSack, bean bag   Lowepro Photo Trekker AW II backpack  DIGITAL DARKROOM Lexar Professional media    Dell Laptop for travel  Epson P ­4000 for travel  Adobe Photoshop CS3   iView MediaPro   Nikon Capture Editor Film/Paper   Fuji Velvia 50 or 100 ISO  Fujiflex Crystal Archive  LABS Printing by Calypso Imaging  Drum scans by West Coast Imaging   MOST IMPORTANT TOOLS FOR PRODUCTIVITY "Digital, continuous ­tone printing has made a big difference in my workflow and  productivity, as opposed to traditional darkroom work. The accuracy of the color­ correcting, dodging and burning, etc., throughout the various­size images I print  has made it much easier for me. I know that if a customer comes into my shop  and sees a 10x14 ­inch print and wants it in a 25x40 that the prints will be an  extremely close match. The ability to do the darkroom work on my PC, FTP the files to the lab I use in  California by midweek, and have them delivered to my gallery in Park City by  Friday is also wonderful. It has completely eliminated the many hours I once  spent driving to a 'local' lab, a 110 ­mile round trip, to deliver a slide, then proof  and/or pick up prints several days later. With gas hitting $4 a gallon, not to  mention my time, this has been a big savings." ­DAVID SCHULTZ Click here for copyright permissions!     Copyright 2009 Cygnus Business Media  
  • 16. enter keyword(s) or titles Photography  • Product Reviews  • How­tos • News • Techniques for Professional Photographers, Photofinishers, & Retailers    Studio Photography PTN Home News Magazines Techniques Reviews Online Exclusives Buyer's Guide Book Store Community Classified Subscribe Home » Studio Photography  » September 2007 Issue  » Magazine Article  More from Studio Photography   More from The September 2007 Issue   More from Jennifer Gidman   yourname@domain  Most Read  |   Most E­mailed  |  E­mail Article  |  Print Article  | Save Article  | License Article      eNewsletter Archive Taking Care of Business  Robert Houser puts a new twist on corporate portraiture with his "traveling conversations"   When companies hire San Francisco photographer Robert Houser to shoot their  annual reports or headshots, executives shouldn't be surprised if they're  whisked out from behind their cluttered desks and into a kitchen, a bathroom­ even a parking garage. "I love parking garages!" Houser explains. "The light in parking garages out  West is like being surrounded by linear softboxes with a roof ­you get no  downlight and all this wonderful sidelight." It's this devotion to "following the light," a well­honed ability to make clients feel  comfortable­even if it means telling them their tie looks dumb­and his belief that  failure is not an option that have put Houser in high demand with the corporate  portraiture crowd. Getting the Suits to Smile Cajoling a grin out of a guy whose blazer is too tight is an often­unappreciated  skill, according to Houser. "Whenever I look at portrait awards books, I get  PTN Dailes HERE frustrated, because they always show celebrities looking fabulous," he says.    "Anybody can make a celebrity look good. I think those who are doing  Robert Houser   portraiture in the business realm and who are doing it well are the ones who  really should be lauded, because these people are not given unlimited time and  access, and a makeup artist and stylist. The other day I had 30 minutes for a  cover story, and the guy showed up 20 minutes late!" In the late 1990s or early 2000s, Houser noticed that the business ­picture realm  was veering into what he called a "hyperreality devoid of emotion." "There were  a whole lot of disconnected profiles of executives, where they weren't looking at  a camera and weren't engaged," he recalls. "I wasn't going to do that kind of  picture. I stopped using hard light and started getting these caught moments  with a lot of available light. It actually brought me less work for a little while, but  it was a direction I think I had been going in." Magazines started taking notice of Houser's unique look. "CFO magazine did a  huge redesign and said they didn't want anything that looked like  BusinessWeek or Forbes. I said,  Good, they don't like me anymore,'" he  laughs. "So I did CFO's second cover assignment after the redesign and the  magazine won a design award for it."   Houser achieves his signature look by specializing in what he calls "traveling  Robert Houser   conversations." "I ended up developing this style of just taking someone for a  walk through my prescouted shot," he explains. "I'd stick them here and there,  and a lot of times based on the conversation we were having, I might try  something different. I'd keep talking to them the whole time. They almost don't  realize they're even being photographed. It engages the person a little more. I  once took the CEO from PG&E outdoors, and we did seven setups in 45 minutes.  The CEO actually remarked later,  No one's ever taken me outside before.'"   Helping his subjects to relax is a skill he's honed through years of practice. "I'm  a flippant New Englander, so I'm kind of obnoxious to these execs," he says. "It  makes me stand out, because I'm talking to them without kissing up to them. I'll 
  • 17. walk through my prescouted shot," he explains. "I'd stick them here and there,  and a lot of times based on the conversation we were having, I might try  something different. I'd keep talking to them the whole time. They almost don't  realize they're even being photographed. It engages the person a little more. I  once took the CEO from PG&E outdoors, and we did seven setups in 45 minutes.  The CEO actually remarked later,  No one's ever taken me outside before.'"   Helping his subjects to relax is a skill he's honed through years of practice. "I'm  a flippant New Englander, so I'm kind of obnoxious to these execs," he says. "It  makes me stand out, because I'm talking to them without kissing up to them. I'll  say, "Your tie looks stupid like that ­move it over this way!" They're not used to  hearing that, so as a result they're very relaxed." Finding some common ground to chat about is also one of Houser's missions. "I  always look for something ­I don't know what I'm looking for, but I'm always  looking for something I'm going to use later," he explains. This technique helps  break the ice, whether it's a piece of artwork on the wall handpicked by the    executive, where the subject went to college (often divulged by a diploma in the  Robert Houser   exec's office), or even how much the company's stock has fluctuated (a result of  Houser's pre ­shoot research. Let There Be Light Houser developed his lighting technique while he was a travel photographer,  many moons before taking on Silicon Valley. "I ended up with a very strong  background in natural light, since that was all I had," he says. "Now, instead of  trying to find the picture and then bring my lights in, I end up looking at the  light, finding where the light is already good, and then seeing what picture  works there. It completely changes the way you're looking at a shot." He still brings his own illumination and improvises in case the light is not  cooperative. "The other day, for instance, for the first time in 100 years of  record­keeping, it rained here in July," he says. "So I had to tweak it a little bit.  On another recent shoot, I did an available ­light shot and lit the guy with a  handheld cosmetic mirror, catching a little bit of light bouncing off a car in the  distance and ricocheting it off the mirror into his face. But it looked really harsh,  and I needed to diffuse it. I didn't have time to get any diffusion, so I spat on    the mirror­hey, it worked!" Robert Houser   Digital has helped him harness the light as well. "If the light is dark or the  windows aren't working, you can change the ISO on the camera and still get  something," he says. "If you work with fast lenses and reasonable ISOs, it's  amazing what you can pull off in fluorescent light. Fluorescent light can be  gorgeous ­everyone avoided it for so many years, but I finally am embracing it." A Penchant for Perfection Keeping his clients happy means that Houser can't accept failure, whether that  means a piece of equipment that dies or a shoot that doesn't go as planned. "I  don't like to trust someone's rental equipment or knowledge or skill base, and  have my shoot hinge on their software working," he says. "Someone else might  say,  Well, my laptop died, these things happen ­good thing I have a backup.'  But does the software work on your backup? Someone asked me the other day  if I had some sort of insurance in my contract if I have a mechanical problem.  There's no clause for me having a failure, because that's not why they're hiring  me. The client can hire someone for $500 and that person could say,  Sorry,  we're having problems.' The person you hire for $5,000 is not going to say that.    That's not to say errors don't happen, but when I hear about advertising  Robert Houser   photographers not backing up and then their hard drive goes down and they  have to redo the shoot, I'm like,  What were they thinking?'"   Houser has also learned to roll with the punches. "I think better if I just show up completely raw and have no ideas or  preconceived notions," he explains. "I did a shoot a few years ago where we had five hours to scout this annual report picture of a bunch of executives. We found a great room, but then they said we had to be closer to the meeting room. There were no rooms  big enough to accommodate them all, so we had to shoot them outside (even though they didn't want an exterior shot) then splice them all in.  1 2 3 next Click here for copyright permissions!     Copyright 2009 Cygnus Business Media  
  • 18. enter keyword(s) or titles Photography  • Product Reviews  • How­tos • News • Techniques for Professional Photographers, Photofinishers, & Retailers    Studio Photography PTN Home News Magazines Techniques Reviews Online Exclusives Buyer's Guide Book Store Community Classified Subscribe Home » Studio Photography  » September 2007 Issue  » Magazine Article  More from Studio Photography   More from The September 2007 Issue   More from Jennifer Gidman    Most Read  |   Most E­mailed  |  E­mail Article  |  Print Article  | Save Article  | License Article      Taking Care of Business  Robert Houser puts a new twist on corporate portraiture with his "traveling conversations"   "Then they wanted to shoot at 3:30 instead of 5:00, even though my makeup  artist was still two hours away. So I powdered everyone up myself and ate the  cost of the makeup artist.  "Then, right when I had figured out the symmetry of the shot with 12 people  (plus one missing person I was planning on splicing in later), a 13th person  showed up at the shoot. But in business, especially in the corporate world, they  just want to hear you say you'll take care of it. If you just keep saying  everything will be fine and figure out a way around it, then the next year, when  they're reshooting the annual report, they'll call back the guy who made  everyone happy." Getting Down to Business To market his work, Houser ditched low ­end postcard campaigns and put more  time into nicer print efforts and the online arena. "If I mail something, I want it  to be an expensive, nice mailer," he says. "But I also decided to try Web­only  marketing for a year. I'm trying to use BlackBook.com, Workbook.com,  Photoserve, and one or two others, and see how that goes for a year."   Robert Houser   Houser sends targeted email campaigns monthly. "I had done a couple of email  campaigns in the past and sent them out to thousands of people," he says. "I  think all that did was put me on blacklists! Now I go after past clients and just  remind them I exist. Every time I get a shoot, I keep the PR person's email. If I  have to do head shots for them after they get an email from me six months  later, it's perfect." A blog has also recently popped up on Houser's website. "I wanted an arena  online where I could regularly show new work," he says. "I didn't want to be  changing my website every day, but I want people to see my new images.  Blogging is a good medium for that." Houser also keeps busy as a co ­founder of both Editorial Photographers and  bigshotstock (visit www.imaginginfo.com for details). He also has embraced  what he used to consider the drudgery of the corporate portraiture world: head  shots.  "I thought it was mainly uncreative work until I had a client for whom I had to  shoot nearly 90 head shots in two days. That meant doing head shots in five­   minute intervals. The people I shot were from all walks of life and different  Robert Houser   countries. While the assignment wasn't creatively stimulating, it gave me good  practice getting subjects comfortable quickly." Once he saw the benefit of the shoot, it didn't seem like drudgery anymore.  "It's like stretching­I don't love sitting down and doing Pilates in the evening,"  he says. "I'd rather have a beer. But in the end, it's exercising some part of me  that will only help me later on. No matter how challenging a job seems, just  figure out what it will do for you." FOR MORE HOUSER IMAGES, VISIT WWW.ROBERTHOUSER.COM FOR MORE BUSINESS TIPS AND INFORMATION, GO TO 
  • 19. practice getting subjects comfortable quickly." Once he saw the benefit of the shoot, it didn't seem like drudgery anymore.  "It's like stretching­I don't love sitting down and doing Pilates in the evening,"  he says. "I'd rather have a beer. But in the end, it's exercising some part of me  that will only help me later on. No matter how challenging a job seems, just  figure out what it will do for you." FOR MORE HOUSER IMAGES, VISIT WWW.ROBERTHOUSER.COM FOR MORE BUSINESS TIPS AND INFORMATION, GO TO  WWW.IMAGINGINFO.COM Most Important Product For Productivity: My Canon IDs Mark II is the most important product for my profitability and  productivity. The switch to digital for me with that camera has resulted in a big  change in my business.    Robert Houser   Robert Houser   Business Tips #5 Tips For Corporate Portraiture Success 1. Find common ground with your subject to create an instant ice ­breaker. 2. Take the executive out of his or her office and into a new environment as  long as it has good light. 3. Learn to think on your feet so you can do whatever the client asks of you.  The client is always right! 4. Deliver what you promised to deliver on time or earlier. 5. Don t nickel­and ­dime valuable clients who bring in a lot of work.  Bob Houser's Gear Box DIGITAL CAMERAS  Canon EOS 1Ds Mark II    Canon EOS 5D Robert Houser   Canon lenses: 50mm f/1.4; 35mm f/1.4; 24mm f/1.4; 100mm f/2; 24mm­70mm  f/2.8; 17mm­40mm f/4; 70mm­200mm f/2.8 IS previous 1 2  3 next   Robert Houser   Click here for copyright permissions!     Copyright 2009 Cygnus Business Media            Submit a Comment or Start a Discussion at http://forums.imaginginfo.com    Name: *  
  • 20. enter keyword(s) or titles Photography  • Product Reviews  • How­tos • News • Techniques for Professional Photographers, Photofinishers, & Retailers    Studio Photography PTN Home News Magazines Techniques Reviews Online Exclusives Buyer's Guide Book Store Community Classified Subscribe Home » Studio Photography  » September 2007 Issue  » Magazine Article  More from Studio Photography   More from The September 2007 Issue   More from Jennifer Gidman    Most Read  |   Most E­mailed  |  E­mail Article  |  Print Article  | Save Article  | License Article      Taking Care of Business  Robert Houser puts a new twist on corporate portraiture with his "traveling conversations"   LIGHTING Minolta Flash Meter 5 Sekonic L­508 spot/flash meter Canon Speedlite 580EX Five White Lightning Ultra 1200s Two Vagabond battery units Flex Fills Home Depot 24  fluorescent work light sticks  DIGITAL/COMPUTER Apple 15­inch MacBook Pro Apple G5 dual processor  Two Dell monitors, 20  and 24   Apple Mini for use by interns and assistants Epson R2400 for portfolio printing Sonnet Tech SATA enclosure; eight 750GB Seagate hard drives, some in a fire  safe;    Portable FireWire drives: one with a clone of the laptop (SuperDuper), others for  Robert Houser   shoot backup NECESSITIES SanDisk Extreme 3 and 4 2GB cards Card readers Lightware Pelican PortaBrace  previous 1 2 3    Robert Houser  
  • 21. enter keyword(s) or titles Photography  • Product Reviews  • How­tos • News • Techniques for Professional Photographers, Photofinishers, & Retailers    Studio Photography PTN Home News Magazines Techniques Reviews Online Exclusives Buyer's Guide Book Store Community Classified Subscribe Home » Studio Photography  » April 2007 Issue  » Magazine Article  More from Studio Photography   More from The April 2007 Issue   More from Jennifer Gidman    Most Read  |   Most E­mailed  |   E­mail Article  |   Print Article    yourname@domain Hyde & Seek  eNewsletter Archive Wildlife photographer John Hyde scopes out the Alaskan landscape for indigenous creatures, carving  There's something about big animals that gets John Hyde's adrenaline flowing  and his camera clicking. "I think it's the fact that they make me feel small and  humble," says the Juneau, Alaska­based wildlife and nature photographer and  owner of Wild Things Photography. "Like when you have a 60 ­foot whale next to your little kayak. Or when there's  an 800­pound grizzly bear 30 feet away from you. Even though he's accepted  your presence, every once in a while he'll turn his head and check on you out of  the corner of his eye. It definitely makes your pulse rate pick up pretty good! I  love the adrenaline rush I get from that!" It's this predilection for heart­pumping photography and his ability to transport  his viewers to the time and place where he's shooting that elevates his work  beyond simple mammalian, avian, and maritime mug shots. "I try to make it so that the person viewing the image has a sense for the  experience I had when I was there," he explains. "I have two different types of  compositions: First, I try to do a shot that's more about the environment and  Images by John Hyde   PTN Dailes HERE the scene than it is about the person or animal. That person or animal is just a  small element in the scene, so I can show a sense of place. The other type of  image is about the action, event, and person or animal. I show the people or  animals half­frame or larger in the picture, and if they're facing the camera you  can see the emotion in their faces and sense the experience they're having." Trekking Over the Tundra Thanks to his degrees in wildlife and animal science, as well as years of  experience, Hyde knows where and when to go to get the best shots. "I'm very  familiar with the wildlife I shoot," he says. "I've studied these animals and spent  so much time with them up here and know where they eat, play, and travel." Interacting with his often ­skittish subjects is a delicate transaction that requires  Images by John Hyde   photographic skills and a lot of patience. "I want to get natural behavior from  the animals, so the animal either has to not know I'm there, or I have to be  there, but to the point that the animal doesn't see me as a threat. The animal  has to accept my presence. That's something you really have to work on, and  not in the middle of a national park. I try to avoid those places. That's where  everyone goes, so another way I make my work look different is to find my own  places." The volatile Alaskan weather patterns also dictate Hyde's shooting schedule  and locales. "If a good weather forecast comes up, and I can access the area at  that time of the year, I'll decide whether I go there or not," he says. "And, of  course, clients always have their own preferences, as well, as to where I shoot,  so that plays a role, too." Images by John Hyde   Keeping his gear safe from the elements is just as critical as striking up a  rapport with a wild animal or knowing what location to select for a good shot. "To protect and condense gear during travel, we often put our loaded Lowepro  and Tamrac backpacks inside our Pelican hard cases, packing clothing, tents,  boots, and sleeping bags around them for extra protection," he says. "Laptops  and hard drives go inside soft cases, which go inside waterproof hard cases. 
  • 22. "To protect and condense gear during travel, we often put our loaded Lowepro  and Tamrac backpacks inside our Pelican hard cases, packing clothing, tents,  boots, and sleeping bags around them for extra protection," he says. "Laptops  and hard drives go inside soft cases, which go inside waterproof hard cases.  Batteries, media, and card readers go inside waterproof hard cases, too. When  you work on, in, and around the water in a temperate rain forest, waterproof is  essential and it's good to have in the snow as well.   "We also carry large cloth bags of desiccant in case gear gets wet in the field. If  this happens, we dry the lens or bodies with very absorbent, lint ­free towels,  then place them inside a waterproof Pelican case with a large bag of desiccant.  Images by John Hyde   We change the bag an hour later. This works well with media cards, too, should  they get wet." Familiarity HIS Forte It's Hyde's intimacy with the animals and the landscape that has allowed him to  achieve business success in his genre. "When some people get into wildlife or travel photography, they try to do  everything," he explains. "What I did was label myself as doing a certain kind of  work and a certain coverage. I decided I'd specialize in whales, bears, and  eagles in Southeast Alaska and to maintain the best client services and  relationships and have new material for them every year. What I didn't do was  try to go to Africa and Antarctica and all over the globe. I'd love to go to those  places as well, but for me, those locations have never been good business  decisions.  Traveling costs so much money; you have to invest a lot of time, and there's a  lot of competition in those areas, because so many people go there all the time.  Lots of people come to Alaska, too, but they're not here all the time, like I am.    They'll come up for two weeks and the weather will be crappy, but I'm here all  Images by John Hyde   the time. Whenever the light's good, I can go out and shoot." The Alaskan light can throw seasoned photographers if they're not from Hyde's  home turf. "I prefer shooting at a 45­degree ­or­less angle of sunlight. In Alaska,  in the summertime, the sun is at 45 degrees or below at times of the day when  most people are sleeping. The best light here in the summer is from 3:00 a.m. to  6:00 a.m. and from 8:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. In the wintertime it's great, because  the sun never goes more than 45 degrees above the horizon, so we get four to  six hours of great light."  Images by John Hyde   1 2 3 next Images by John Hyde   Images by John Hyde  
  • 23. enter keyword(s) or titles Photography  • Product Reviews  • How­tos • News • Techniques for Professional Photographers, Photofinishers, & Retailers    Studio Photography PTN Home News Magazines Techniques Reviews Online Exclusives Buyer's Guide Book Store Community Classified Subscribe Home » Studio Photography  » April 2007 Issue  » Magazine Article  More from Studio Photography   More from The April 2007 Issue   More from Jennifer Gidman    Most Read  |   Most E­mailed  |   E­mail Article  |   Print Article    yourname@domain Hyde & Seek  eNewsletter Archive Wildlife photographer John Hyde scopes out the Alaskan landscape for indigenous creatures, carving  Which is why visitors from the "lower 48," as Hyde refers to it, are often puzzled  at Hyde's response to the question, "So, when are we getting up to shoot?"  Hyde replies, "How does 2:30 a.m. sound?" "After we shoot, I'll crawl into the bushes or nestle into the kayak and go to  sleep. I'll tell whoever's with me to wake me up at 4 in the afternoon! People  usually don't know what I'm doing, but we're going to be working again from 8  to 11 that night, and photographing animals can be tiring, so I need to rest!" Hyde keeps his post ­production work simple, using it if he needs to for the  client's perspective or for the artistic perspective. "I can't do a whole lot of retouching, or the workflow would be bogged down  like crazy," he says. "To keep everything moving, I've started working with  Adobe Lightroom. It's a faster workflow for me than using Photoshop. I can  open images and review them and add metadata. I can do a variety of  exposures of a scene and then combine those exposures into one and get a  really nicely exposed image, no matter what the light was really like." Images by John Hyde   PTN Dailes HERE Constant Creatures  Hyde's customers come to him year after year because each image shows  everything they want it to show in one depiction. "I specialize in what I do, and I have new material all the time," he says. "They  want new material they don't want to use the same picture over and over,  especially if they have the same recurring need. If a client needs photos of  whales, they need something different every time. They come to me because I  have new pictures every year."  Besides his regulars, Hyde finds new clients through word ­of­mouth and when  people catch a glimpse of his portfolio. "One of my pieces will get printed and  someone will say,  Wow, I can't use that, but I want something like that. Or, if  Images by John Hyde   it's editorial, they'll want to use the same picture." Keeping up with ever ­evolving technology remains a challenge, especially when  Hyde would rather be cavorting with orca whales or bald eagles. "Things are changing so quickly. There are so many new technologies, and  people are adapting and changing the way they take and look at photographs,"  he says. "You have to keep up. It takes away from the creative process, but I  can't afford not to do it. So I have to bite the bullet like teachers have to keep  taking continuing ­ed classes. When I receive the beta 3 version of Photoshop, I  have to use it. And even though I'm not really a technical person, people still  come to me for technical expertise because I have been doing it for so long and  I know how to do things." Hyde also shares his experience and expertise by leading a variety of  Images by John Hyde   workshops. "I have one coming up at the end of May/beginning of June on a  vessel named the Pacific Catalyst. It's a weeklong trip through Southeast  Alaska, where we'll see glaciers, birds, and whatever else we might run into,"  he says. "Then there's another one at the end of July/beginning of August near  Katmai National Park, where we'll be looking for brown bears."
  • 24. vessel named the Pacific Catalyst. It's a weeklong trip through Southeast  Alaska, where we'll see glaciers, birds, and whatever else we might run into,"  he says. "Then there's another one at the end of July/beginning of August near  Katmai National Park, where we'll be looking for brown bears." He has a couple of book projects in the works, as well. "One that's coming up is  about the Juneau ice fields, which is a spectacular place to photograph," he  says. "People think of an ice field or a glacier as a remote, sterile place where  nothing happens, but that's not necessarily the case. It can be that way, but  here it's a fantastic environment where you can do research, on global warming,  for example. It's also a prime recreation place for climbers, skiers, backpackers,  and glacier trekkers." Images by John Hyde   When all is said and done, Hyde will continue to concentrate on shooting his  animal subjects and staying safe in the process.   "I've had a few close encounters when I was just in the way and they were in a  hurry, like when one bear was chasing another on the same path I was on," he  says. "Another time, a male bear was running down the beach chasing after a  female during the mating season, and I didn't notice because my head was  buried in my pack looking for some spare media. And another time I thought a  huge male orca was going to ram my kayak. "All of these close calls ended without incident, and left me just a bit wiser  about what can happen when you work with large, wild  animals." previous 1 2  3 next   Images by John Hyde   Images by John Hyde   Images by John Hyde   Images by John Hyde  
  • 25. enter keyword(s) or titles Photography  • Product Reviews  • How­tos • News • Techniques for Professional Photographers, Photofinishers, & Retailers    Studio Photography PTN Home News Magazines Techniques Reviews Online Exclusives Buyer's Guide Book Store Community Classified Subscribe Home » Studio Photography  » April 2007 Issue  » Magazine Article  More from Studio Photography   More from The April 2007 Issue   More from Jennifer Gidman    Most Read  |   Most E­mailed  |   E­mail Article  |   Print Article    Hyde & Seek  Wildlife photographer John Hyde scopes out the Alaskan landscape for indigenous creatures, carving  For more of John Hyde's images, visit www.wildthingsphotography.com   Most Important Product for Productivity "My Canon EOS ­1Ds Mark II gives me better quality than 35mm film. I can look  at my images and evaluate them immediately; I don't have to wait for them to  get back from the processor, which up here could be weeks to a month. If I  don't get the shot, going back to the client is not ideal, which you would have to  do with film. So for me, digital gives me control over the shoot and I can work for  a longer period of time. The instant feedback I get from my images, both when  they're in the camera and when I get the images back to look at them on a  laptop, really helps my creative process. The turnaround is much faster, and I'm  more productive."  John Hyde    John Hyde's Gear Box Images by John Hyde   Digital Cameras  Canon EOS ­1Ds Mark II Canon EOS 30D  Lenses 16­35mm f/2.8 L, 24­70mm f/2.8L, 45mm f/2.8 TS, 70­200mm f/2.8L, 100mm  f/2.8 macro, 300mm f/2.8 L, 600mm f/4.0 L Hardware Apple G5  Apple 23" displays  Apple 20" iMac (office) Images by John Hyde   Apple 13" MacBook (in the field) RAID external drives  Software liveBooks 5.0 Adobe Photoshop CS2 & CS3 (beta) Adobe Lightroom Canon Digital Photo Pro Various sharpening, noise reduction,  HDR plug­ins and stitching software Printers "HP and Canon printers are in our studio, but we do all our art print work at  service providers to take advantage of the newest and best printers. We've  Images by John Hyde   developed custom profiles for each Epson printer, so proofs are very close or  right on from the start."  Accessories Gitzo tripods Really Right Stuff ballheads
  • 26. Accessories Gitzo tripods Really Right Stuff ballheads Lowepro and Tamrac backpacks  Pelican hard cases Kingston, SanDisk, Lexar CF(2­4GB) and SD cards (1­2GB) Apple iPod (for photos and music) Custom­made remote ­release  underwater housing with dome port previous 1 2 3  Images by John Hyde     Images by John Hyde   Images by John Hyde   Images by John Hyde   Images by John Hyde  
  • 27. enter keyword(s) or titles Photography  • Product Reviews  • How­tos • News • Techniques for Professional Photographers, Photofinishers, & Retailers    Studio Photography PTN Home News Magazines Techniques Reviews Online Exclusives Buyer's Guide Book Store Community Classified Subscribe Home » Studio Photography  » October 2008 Issue  » Magazine Article  More from Studio Photography   More from The October 2008 Issue   More from Jennifer Gidman   yourname@domain  Most Read  |   Most E­mailed  |  E­mail Article  |  Print Article  | Save Article  | License Article      eNewsletter Archive Charitable Captures  Photographers team up with charities and other nonprofits for good causes   Running a business involves using your brains (to make smart business decisions) and your gut (instincts can go a long way when  dealing with a challenging client). But letting your heart occasionally rule the roost can be the impetus behind your most inspiring  projects, as the photographers in the stories that follow can testify. In celebration of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and in  honor of all the good causes that exist out there, we're bringing you these compelling stories of how some of your fellow  photographers chose to donate their time, efforts, and funds to help people in need in a variety of situations. Diamond Girls: An Empowering Experience Over the course of five months, I photographed several breast cancer survivors for the Susan G. Komen  Breast Cancer Foundation, a breast cancer research and support facility. The women exposed their scars,  reconstruction (or lack of), bald heads, battle wounds, and their hearts as they allowed me to capture this  challenging time in their lives. I photographed them alone, with their husbands, their girlfriends, with and  without clothing. It was an empowering experience for my "Diamond Girls."  In February 2008, I hosted the Diamond Girls Gala, a gallery showing of images of each woman. Every image  was accompanied by that woman's story of triumph­­ [stories that were] sad, happy, emotional, angry,  PTN Dailes HERE spiritual, and raw. Several restaurants and local businesses donated food and silent auction items. In just  over two hours, my little company (plus several wonderful volunteers) raised more than $2,000 in the fight  against breast cancer. It was an incredible experience for both me and the women who participated.  Shown here [at right] is an image of Joy, one of my Diamond Girls, and her partner. Joy chose not to do  reconstruction and instead got 12 butterflies tattooed all over her chest in place of her breasts to symbolize her strength, beauty, and triumph. ­Andi Diamond , www.andidiamond.com  Laughter: The Best Medicine My mother was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2006; my friend and client was diagnosed with colon cancer in 2005; my  son's girlfriend was diagnosed with melanoma in 2006 at the age of 17; and another friend was just diagnosed this year  with colon cancer. The cancer in our area is extremely high, and I wanted to do something for the community­­ to share  my photography and show that laughter is the best medicine.  With the help of Jodi Waymoth, my friend and client, we decided to create "The Spirit of Survival" portraits [shown above  left], which show cancer survivors laughing and having fun with their family members in my studio. Every cancer has a  color­­ we chose different types of cancer, placed a scarf around the cancer survivor, and [created] black­and­white  prints with the scarf representing the cancer. Each print is 16x24, framed and matted. The American Cancer Society (ACS) in our area is displaying all the portraits and asking for donations to go directly to ACS.  ­Jayne Schumacher, www.portraitsbyjafa.com  Revved Up for UCP In June I was hired to photograph a classic car show in Houston called "Classy Chassis," held at Reliant  Stadium. I specialize in writing and photographing vintage and classic cars for car magazines around the  world. The event benefited United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Houston. Among the beautiful cars on  display were superbly restored Bugattis, Duesenbergs, Jaguars, Ferraris, Porsches, and Corvettes. The  cars brought automotive history to life, but more important, they benefited children with disabilities and 
  • 28. cars brought automotive history to life, but more important, they benefited children with disabilities and  their families.  At the end of the day, a spectacular 1939 Bugatti Type 57C Van Vooren Cabriolet once owned by the  Shah of Iran and entered by the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles won Best of Show. I was  moved by the compassion and devotion displayed by the volunteers. I donated my entire fee to the  United Cerebral Palsy Foundation during the awards ceremony. I told committee member David Dutch.  His hug was from the bottom of his heart, and I felt it! ­­Howard Koby, www.howardkoby.com  "Mr. Picture Man" Helps At­Risk Kids  My sister is the co­founder of Gordon Parks Elementary School in Kansas City, MO, a charter school that caters to at ­risk children. It has been in existence for 10 years. More than 90 percent of the children  come from Operation Breakthrough, which is run by St. Vincent's Day Care. For 10 years, I've done  individual, class, and special­event photography as my contribution to the community.   When I roam the school, children invariably call out to me, "Hey, Mr. Picture Man!" It's a label I enjoy  immensely. The photo shown [at bottom left] is from Back to School Night, held in July 2008. ­­Jim Jarvis, www.Pbase.com/jarvol   Walls of Hope I donated fine­art portrait work to line the walls of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), as well as  the halls between the north and south lobbies, in the Margot Perot Center for Women and Infants at  Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas. The work, entitled "The Walls and Halls of Hope," is valued at $75,000  and features a series of 54 images of Presbyterian­born children, many of whom are premature birth  survivors, and their families. Over the next few years, I'll continue to add other installments of photos to the displays. Touched by my own experience, as well as those shared by my clients, I wanted to give back to the  Presbyterian community in a personal and inspirational way. I reached out to my client base and asked  for volunteers who had children born at the hospital. More than 200 families volunteered, and I chose 45 families to feature in the permanent display. I hope to share their stories of survival, joy, and hope with  other families, especially those of newborns admitted to the NICU or needing special medical attention. Each one of these families has an incredible story, and I wanted to capture that in the photos. My work  brings me great joy every day, and I'm happy to be able to share that with others in the community. Our main goal in carrying out this project is for a parent of a baby born prematurely to see the images of  these survivors along the walls of the NICU and think "Miracles do happen­­ if this baby made it, so can  mine." ­­Kimberly Wylie, www.kimberlywylie.com  It's a Beautiful Life Last year I followed my heart and produced a calendar to raise funds for pro­life education. The result  was a lush calendar called "Life Is Beautiful." It featured beautiful, noncontroversial quotes about life  that go beautifully with each photograph. The expenses were underwritten by various corporations in  the area. The local daily in Philadelphia, The Bulletin, picked up the story and ran free ads for us. It was  printed magnificently by Marathon Press, who gave us a nice quantity discount. We raised $7,000. We're at it again this year, with 10,000 copies to be printed. Our story this time is fatherhood. It  includes many photos of fathers and their children, and will be equally lush.  ­­Maria Kurmlavage, www.luminous5.com  Daniel's Care We were drawn to Hospice's Daniel's Care program; the main mission of Daniel's Care is to assist  children with life­threatening or life­limiting illnesses by providing them with the highest­quality care. Daniel's Care services enable children to be at home as much as possible, allowing the families to  lead a more normal life.  This inspired us to start the "Images That Speak" program. We not only wanted to give back to our  community­­ we also wanted to give families in need a memorable gift. The program was created to  provide one Daniel's Care family per month the chance to visit our studio and to receive a free wall­ size, matted, framed Relationship black­and­white portrait with their child. We feel blessed to be  involved in this program­­ these brave families allow us to put a "face" on the Daniel's Care mission.  ­­Tim and Bev Walden, www.waldensphotography.com 
  • 29. Calendar Girls Redux I produced a calendar, called "Bares It ALL," similar to the one in the movie Calendar Girls. I decided I'd  photograph women, mostly survivors, and have them topless but covered with creative props or  creativelighting.  I'm currently working on the fifth calendar! To date, we've made more than $150,000 and have helped  women all over western North Carolina. As I like to tell people: Don't ask what the world needs; ask  what makes you come alive, and go do that. ­­Robin K. Reed, www.baresitall.com  Say Cheese! Kids Fighting Cancer "The Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation (PCRF) has presented a photography exhibit titled 'Things That Make My Face  Say Cheese,' featuring the photography of six children who are fighting cancer. I created and directed the project,  designed to raise awareness of pediatric cancer by gifting young oncology children with a digital camera, pairing the child  with his or her own personal professional­photographer mentor, and sending them off to photograph whatever or whomever makes them smile­ultimately creating a photographic exhibit to move, touch, and inspire.  "In May 2008, the exhibit had its premiere at a photography gallery in Santa Ana, CA. In June, the show was on display at  CHOC (Children's Hospital of Orange County). It was also on display at the Orange County Fair, which, coincidentally, had  "Say Cheese" as its theme this year. South Coast Plaza, the premiere mall of Southern California, displayed the exhibit  during its Festival of Children in September. In October, the exhibit will travel to Loma Linda University Hospital for its final  show of the year. After the exhibit tour, plans are to auction the photos at the foundation's  year­end dinner and  fundraiser. Plans are also underway to continue the project next year. "We wanted to have professionals work with the kids to help them  in identifying and capturing the things in their life that  gave them joy and made them smile. We were delighted by what they delivered." ­Al Nomura, alnomuraphotography@gmail.com  Focused on a Cure "What started out as a fundraiser for my sister last year, who was diagnosed with breast cancer, has become our 'Focused on a Cure' campaign here at Irresistible Portraits. We have always tried to help out our  community by raising awareness  through photography. What better way to help a great cause than to get your family together and finally have the family  portrait that you can never seem to fit in everyone's busy lives.  "Last fall, we photographed handicap children at Wings of Eagles, a therapeutic horse ranch, to raise money for the ranch.  This summer, we formed our own team, Digital Divas, to walk in the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer being held in October.  We're raising awareness for breast cancer and fighting to find a cure. We recently sent an email to our clients and friends  to see if they would be interested in sharing their stories of how this disease has changed their lives, to help them or  others that are going through this. We photographed these awesome women and used ideas from their stories in a  collection that was displayed at our studio in August and September. We hope to  be able to display this campaign as a  traveling exhibit throughout our community." ­Renda Ayscue, www.irresistableportraits.com  Strength Through Survival "Dreams can come true, and I'm living proof, as it happened to me this year. I had a vision five months ago of doing a  black­and­white study  to honor local women and give something of myself back to the community. Through networking  and a chain of events, I created 'Strength Through Survival,' a pictorial celebration of the triumphs over breast cancer.  "I had some goals that I wanted to meet along this journey. One was to meet these women I was  about to photograph;  learn from their stories, and portray them as they wished to tell their stories to the world. I chose the Mercy Pink Ribbon  Fund to give back to the community­it's a local organization that enables people with little or no insurance to receive  advanced breast cancer screening. "I wanted to have a grand opening for the event to raise awareness and funds for this organization, which we did last  October. We raised more than $1,400 in three hours. I also wanted a big party to celebrate all of them at the end. The  party was a high­tea and fashion show. We had raffles and door prizes, and vendors participated in the event. We raised  more than $7,500 for the fund. The show is on the Mercy Hospital website (www.mymercy.us). "Along the way, I met some incredibly strong women. These women are survivors, they are your family our  co ­workers ,  your friends, your neighbors­and without your help and support, they would never have made it through their darkest days. This exhibit is not just about me as an artist ­it's about all of the survivors. I'm just the vehicle that has given them a  voice." ­Rose Norton  Making a Difference in Kids' Lives "I feel I've made a difference in the lives of many young children with pulmonary disorders. I became involved in a camp for
  • 30. these kids in 1986 (I had two stepkids who attended this camp). My wife and I went to  the talent show that year, and we  both said we would like to be involved in the camp. I started taking photos and slides for the camp to show parents and   potential donators what went on there.  "For the last 10 years, I've been doing a video that  shows better what the camp does for these special kids while also  taking photos. After camp is over, I make DVDs, and we provide them for all the campers and staff to remember their year  there. When I see one of the children during the year, I can see how much camp and the video means to them. This  experience has been one of the most rewarding things I've ever done. We just completed our 23rd year." ­Scott Riecke, www.paradiseproductionsinc.com  Local Assistance "We've always dreamed of what we would do if we won the  lottery. We'd love to start a foundation. Along with funding  several favorite organizations and answering needs of the community, Michael would do photography for nonprofits in need, and Jennifer would handle public relations to spread the word about our efforts and services.  "Throughout 2007, we, through studio m, have been able to donate more than $80,000 in studio services and products to  local schools and nonprofit organizations. Beneficiaries include La Jolla Elementary School, The Bishop's School, Old Globe  Theatre, Museum of Contemporary Art, Las Patonas, Tony Hawk Foundation, Sundt Memorial Foundation, San Diego  Repertory Theatre, and more than 50 others. "Through a program Jennifer launched a few years ago, the studio reaches out to schools and organizations prior to their  respective fundraising events, offering donations of gift certificates for professional portrait sessions and fine­art  photography prints and gifts, including albums, handbags, and jewelry. Each year, the offers are greatly appreciated, but  2007 was a watershed year for our giving. We have really streamlined our process of donating so that we can reach  several more organizations and tailor each donation to a specific event. Whether it's the  Jewel Ball or a potluck dinner for a high­school sports team, we're thrilled to be able to participate.  "Along with the donations of gift certificates, Michael continuously offers in­kind photography services to a few special  groups, working throughout the year with the ladies of Las Patronas on their photography  needs, and photographing the  students at his daughters' school for a spectacular slideshow shown at the annual gala. He has also provided event  photography for groups such as the Boy Scouts of America and the La Jolla Recreation Center. ­Jennifer and Michael Spengler, www.studiomlajolla.com  Helping NJ Families "I am one of the board members of the 503c corporation Arms Around Morristown. What we do each year is find the 20  poorest families in Morristown, NJ, no matter how many kids they have (one family has 9), and we treat them to school  bags and supplies, holiday meals, and home repair; we're working on adding auto repair and doctor care in the near future. "The families (we hope) will keep changing as some of the families move up from being the 20 poorest. What we offer is  free to our clients/friends, so we constantly look for gifts from small companies, large corporations, and individuals. Our  goal is to bless and improve the lives of the families we serve. We miss the ones who leave, but we are glad that they are  moving up and onward. "Right now we help people who are known by Morristown's Office of Temporary Assistance. Therefore, they're all legal  citizens living in Morristown but have great needs, which we try to meet." ­Bill Truran, www.billtruran.com  Keeping Seniors Company "For the past 15 years, I've worked the Wilmette Rotary Club Golf outing and provided complimentary images to the club.  Wilmette Rotary use the images to attract golfers to the annual event, which raises several  thousand dollars every year to fund their charitable projects. "In addition, my family spends its Thanksgiving at the Wilmette Seniors Club, serving Thanksgiving dinner to the elderly.  This tradition began when the Simm clan, first­generation immigrants, didn't know what to do with themselves on a holiday  they weren't quite used to. So I, and the children, all set off to work as servers and helpers at the Rotary­sponsored  event for lonely seniors. "The children all started at around seven years and kept it up until adulthood; Ahmed, my eldest boy, missed just one year  while on active duty in Iraq with the U.S. military. Other than that, the tradition continues." ­David Simm, www.davidsimmphotography.com  Project Cuddle "For the last several years, we've been privileged to work with Project Cuddle, an amazing organization dedicated to  preventing infants from being abandoned. Our dear friend Debbe Magnusen started this project in the small garage of her  home, and it has now grown into a nationwide program that finds homes for unwanted babies. In addition, Project Cuddle  helps pregnant women who might otherwise abandon babies to safely deliver the babies, and then finds loving homes for  them. 
  • 31. "Over the last year, we worked with Project Cuddle to create a calendar to help generate funds for the organization. We  photographed some of the beautiful babies and children who have been adopted through Project Cuddle. It was amazing to work with these families. We asked each mother what she felt the first time she looked into her new baby's eyes, and with  tears in their eyes, they said things such as: 'It's amazing how much love you can have for a child, knowing you would do  anything for her'; 'I couldn't wait to get her home and spend the rest of my life loving her'; 'All of our dreams came true  when we first held our child in our arms.' "You wouldn't believe the joy and gratitude that emanated from these proud and loving parents. We really enjoyed working  with them and their beautiful children, photographing them in our studio for the 2008 calendar that Project Cuddle sells to  raise funds for their organization. And it felt good to us, too: We were honored to be a part of such a worthy  cause. Graphic designer Anjani Gupta also contributed by donating her time to help design the calendar pages.  "We were very surprised and deeply touched when Project  Cuddle presented us with the President's Choice Volunteer of the Year Award. What a remarkable and unexpected recognition to receive! Spending time with these remarkable parents  and their adorable children was enough of a reward for us.  ­Maria and Prasad, www.prasadphoto.com  Caregivers United "For the past year, I have worked on a photography project, the Raymond W. Holman Jr. Caregivers Portrait Project, which is presently on exhibit at the African American Museum in Philadelphia. The project is the result of my  father, Raymond W.  Holman Sr., dying from complications of dementia in 2001.  "The exhibit focuses on 57 family caregivers who have or still are taking care of family members with Alzheimer's disease or dementia. My father developed dementia in 1997, and shortly thereafter I hired two caregivers to stay with him eight hours a day at his house, since he could no longer be there alone. On August 16, 2001, my father passed away in his house (as  he wished), and not in a nursing home. I believe the two caregivers who took care of my father extended and improved the quality of his life.  "In 2004 I was shooting an assignment for WHYY TV/12 Public Broadcasting Station in Wilmington, DE. The assignment  was about a husband and wife, Florence and Russell Collins. Russell developed frontal temporal dementia when he was 50  years old. Florence became his primary caregiver. I decided at the completion of that one­day assignment to approach  Florence about doing a long­term project on them, which lasted for eight months. I went to their house  on average once a week. It soon became clear I was witnessing the same love and care that I saw when I watched the two women take care of my father.  "At the completion of my eight months with Florence and Russell, I attempted to get a photo story published in local  newspapers both in Philadelphia, PA, and Wilmington, DE, but had no success. In the spring of 2007, I decided to do a  portrait project concentrating on caregivers. Richard Watson, the curator for  the African American Museum in Philadelphia, approached me about having the exhibit at his museum. I approached the  Alzheimer's Association Delaware Valley Chapter, and they agreed to partner with me. Shortly thereafter, I approached  WHYY TV/12, which also agreed to help get the word out that. I was seeking caregivers who would be willing to come to  my studio to do a portrait session. A very well­known councilperson, Philadelphia councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown,  came onboard and provided great support.  "On May 8, 2008, the African American Museum in Philadelphia had the opening reception for the Raymond W. Holman Jr.  Caregivers Portrait Project. It was a huge success. People have come from as far away as Los Angeles, West Palm Beach,  and Detroit to see the exhibit." ­Raymond Holman, www.rholmanjrphoto.com  Helping NJ Families "I am one of the board members of the 503c corporation Arms Around Morristown. What we do each year is find the 20  poorest families in Morristown, NJ, no matter how many kids they have (one family has 9), and we treat them to school  bags and supplies, holiday meals, and home repair; we're working on adding auto repair and doctor care in the near future. "The families (we hope) will keep changing as some of the families move up from being the 20 poorest. What we offer is  free to our clients/friends, so we constantly look for gifts from small companies, large corporations, and individuals. Our  goal is to bless and improve the lives of the families we serve. We miss the ones who leave, but we are glad that they are  moving up and onward. "Right now we help people who are known by Morristown's Office of Temporary Assistance. Therefore, they're all legal  citizens living in Morristown but have great needs, which we try to meet." ­Bill Truran, www.billtruran.com  Click here for copyright permissions!     Copyright 2009 Cygnus Business Media  
  • 32. Classic Nuptials Joe Buissink embraces technology by dabbling in digital with his D2x and D200—and taps into tradition with his F6. From the time he started shooting weddings, Beverly Hills photog- rapher Joe Buissink knew he wanted to create his own signature style. “From day one, I was trying for that 1930s-1940s feel, that LIFE magazine quality: Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank, all the masters,” he says. “I wanted to bring that to people, for my images to look like timeless scenes from the ’30s and ’40s.” Joe’s D2x has helped him easily transition this classic film shooting style to the digital realm. “The D2x is seamless,” he explains. “I shoot the D2x like I would a film camera. It felt exactly the same as my F6 when I first picked it up—it had the same functionality, the quick- ness, the accuracy of the meter, all the same things the F6 has.” The D2x comes through for Joe in some of his most challenging © Cliff Mautner shooting situations. “I’ll use the D2x when I need faster focusing in lower-light situations,” he says. “Plus the D2x battery lasts through 1,500 images—I love the ability to shoot the entire wedding without worrying about the battery dying on me.” His recent forays with the new D200 offered Joe some nice sur- © Joe Buissink prises. “In mixed lighting situations, the D200 was right on,” he says. “That for me was the biggest deal. I can shoot this camera in avail- able light or mixed lighting, and the images are always beautiful.” What Joe witnessed on his D200’s LCD was, simply put, “awesome.” “The color balance is very accurate,” he says. “I originally started shooting RAW, because I didn’t necessarily like the capture of digital “There’s not a whole lot of post-pro- in the beginning in terms of color. I didn’t have time to do the custom W duction needed when shooting with white balance, since I shoot very fast. I’d shoot in RAW so I could fix things in post-production. I don’t have to worry about that with the the D200—it’s right on the money.” D200; there’s not a whole lot of post-prod needed in terms of white —JOE BUISSINK balance—it’s right on the money.” The D200 has also proven to be an ergonomic blessing. “It’s really capitalize on available light. “I shoot with fast films, and my film gets simple to carry around, and it feels good in the hand,” he says. “Plus processed by inspection, a long-lost art. While it’s in the developer, my E it works with the SB-800 Speedlight like an amazing little trooper.” guy will take the film out and look under a green light to see how much Lighting is critical in his wedding work, and Joe is always looking to further it has to be processed before it gets pulled out of the developer. That way, it’s right where it needs to be. The grain is very fine, and it’s got beautiful contrast to it. I can get away with shooting at 3200 and © Kevin Kubota edding © Joe Buissink 6400 without having my photos be underexposed or muddy-looking.” Joe’s F6 is still a core part of his wedding work. “I feel the F6 is probably one of Nikon’s flagship cameras—it is my favorite camera,” he says. In fact, he’s recently handed over digi- tal responsibilities to his other shooter so he can return to his roots. “He shoots all digital, dge all the formal stuff in color, while I concentrate on the film, all black-and-white. I get to do my thing, hanging from the rafters with the long © Joe Buissink 2006 lens—all my artsy stuff!” § To see more of Joe Buissink’s work, go to www.joebuissink.com © Claudia Kronenberg Published on behalf of Nikon Inc. by Cygnus Business Media, Cygnus Imaging Group Custom Publishing Department 3 Huntington Quadrangle, Suite 301N, Melville, NY 11747. Designed by Marianne Pardal. Edited by Jennifer Gidman Zumpano. © 2006, Nikon, Inc., 1300 Walt Whitman Road, Melville, NY 11747-3064, U.S.A. http://www.nikondigital.com ADVERTISING SECTION
  • 33. PERFECT UNION Ask professional wed- ding photographers how they use their equipment to capture the big day, and there will be plenty The New D200 Joins the Nikon Total Imaging System of discussion about Cameras are often described as superfast, sharp, or rugged—but how many are built right into the camera, as well as wireless image transfer over a megapixels, color rendi- said to be truly intelligent? Wi-Fi network built into the optional WT-3 Wireless Transmitter (available Enter the new Nikon D200™ digital SLR, a high-performance wedding wonder later this year). The camera’s powerful built-in Speedlight, capable of tion, and proper lighting. that will bring a new spark to every candle ceremony, a welcome perspective to coverage for lenses as wide as 18mm, features a Commander Mode that can wirelessly control up to three separate groups of an unlimited number each conga line on the dance floor, and an ease of use that will make you wonder of i-TTL Speedlights such as the SB-800, SB-600, and the SB-R200. The But delve a little deeper, how you ever documented an “I do” without it. It’s smarter, faster, stronger— Commander Mode in the D200 can adjust flash compensation settings and you’ll find that the think of it as the Bionic Man of digital cameras. for each of the two groups on the fly, making light output control from Speedlights placed in hard-to-reach locations simple and effortless. pros aren’t just mesmer- Smarter... Add in a large 2.5-inch viewing LCD with a 170-degree viewing NIKON D200 What makes this camera a candidate for matrimonial Mensa? For starters, since it’s equipped angle, visually enhanced user menus, and compatibility with the rest ized by their gear’s bells of the Nikon Total Imaging System (including Nikon’s DX Nikkor lenses, with Nikon’s exclusive 1,005-pixel 3D Matrix Metering II, the D200 is able to find ideal exposures and whistles: They want even in the least ideal lighting conditions (including dimly lit churches and poorly illuminated designed exclusively for Nikon DSLRs), and you’ll see why the D200 is reception halls). This advanced system employs further improved algorithms for even better evalu- ready to become the next wedding workhorse in your special-events an imaging system that ation of large-area highlight and shadow detail. stable. The 10.2-effective-megapixel image sensor on the D200 incorporates a high-speed four-chan- is so ergonomically nel data output and a new Optical Low Pass Filter that significantly reduces any incidence of Total Imaging moire, as well as color fringing and shifting. This four-channel output allows the camera to inherit System friendly and intuitive (in the advanced image-processing engine of the Nikon D2x™ professional digital SLR, combining The D200 joins Nikon’s stellar color-independent preconditioning prior to A/D conversion with advanced digital image processing family of professional imaging addition to providing algorithms to deliver fine color gradations with smooth, consistent transitions. equipment. The Nikon Total Imag- the high quality they The D200’s 11-area AF system, convertible to a seven-wide area AF system, is based on Nikon’s ing System continues to wed tradi- advanced Multi-Cam 1000 AF Sensor Module. Not only does this AF system support the photogra- tion with technology: From the tried-and- demand) that their cam- pher with fast and precise auto focus under a variety of shooting conditions, but it also offers an true D2x, the flagship F6™ film camera, array of functions for greater flexibility. exclusive Nikkor VR (Vibration Reduction) eras and accessories and DX lenses, and the i-TTL Wireless Faster... Speedlight system, the lineup helps you become an extension of You don’t want to miss a single expressive glance or furtive flower-girl antic, and the D200’s implement an effortless workflow and responsiveness ensures you’ll get every shot. The D200 can shoot continuously at up to five frames achieve the creativity you’re looking for in the their creative selves. With per second, capturing up to 37 JPEG images (when using select high-performance CompactFlash limo, at the altar, and on the dance floor. the Nikon D200, the D2x, cards capable of and certified for this performance specification) or up to 22 NEF (RAW) images, NIKON SB-800 making it ideal for the big day. NIKON D2x and the other standout With an industry-leading power-up time of 0.15 seconds, the D200 is ready to shoot as soon as you’re ready. Its reduced shutter release time lag of 50 milliseconds is nearly undetectable, and Next-Generation Capture Software players that comprise when shooting in the continuous burst mode of five frames per second, its shortened viewfinder blackout time (between each successive shot) of just 105 milliseconds proves especially useful in To help you in your post-production endeavors, Capture NX is the Nikon Total Imaging keeping an eye on a moving subject—whether it’s Uncle James on the dance floor or the ringbearer Nikon’s all-new image processing and editing software that inherits showing off his new juggling skills. the robust RAW (NEF) processing capabilities from Nikon Capture™ System, wedding pho- 4.4, and combines these with brand-new features such as Nik Soft- tographers have discov- Stronger... ware, Inc.’s revolutionary, patented U Point technology (which enables Just like the couples you’re photographing on their special day, you and your gear are in it edits to portions of an image or the entire image without requiring ered the perfect marriage for the long haul. The D200 is designed with long-term durability, ruggedness, and precision in the photographer to manually outline or mask the editable area), mind. Built on a magnesium alloy chassis and body cover, the D200 combines light weight with seamless image-browsing, advanced batch-processing capabili- of superior picture qual- high-level durability. It also features an enhanced environmental sealing system that helps protect ties, superior color management control, and comprehensive system exterior seams from potentially damaging moisture and dust. The D200’s double-bladed shutter compatibility with Nikon’s Digital Imaging System. ity, remarkable speed, unit is tested to well over 100,000 cycles, ensuring highly reliable performance year after year. With its wide-ranging features, user-friendly interface, and power- You won’t have to worry about running out of power in the middle of the ceremony with the ful performance, Capture NX makes image editing visually intuitive, and a system that lets allowing you to immediately see the effects as they are applied. The D200. With a capacity of up to 1,800 shots per charge, the D200 also features an intelligent power management Fuel Gauge that constantly monitors the battery’s precise remaining power in 1% software is scheduled for delivery this spring. them effortlessly shoot in increments. It also displays the total number of shots taken on each charge, as well as overall life NIKON F6 their own unique styles. of the battery, so photographers can easily tell when to replace a battery. Like the D2x before it, the D200 features Nikon’s advanced i-TTL wireless Speedlight control For more information on the groundbreaking Nikon D200 and other Nikon products, go to nikondigital.com.
  • 34. I Second That Emotion Lens Lineup A bride will never feel the stress of the day You’ll always find a if Kevin Kubota has any say—and his stockpile of Nikon lenses Nikon D2x and D200 capture those in Kevin Kubota’s wedding workbag, including the relaxed moments for all time. 12-24mm, the 85mm f/1.4, the 50mm f/1.4, and While documenting the details of the intricately designed gown and the 70-200mm. “I have a the icing peaks on the multi-tiered cake are important, it’s the peak couple of others I throw in of emotions that Kevin Kubota is after when he’s shooting a wedding. there, too, like the fisheye “What I go for are those intimate, precise moments,” says the Bend, lens,” he says. “If I could take only one or two lenses, I’d pick the 12-24mm Oregon, wedding photographer. “I often look for more of the joyful, and the 70-200mm. My philosophy is to stay away from the middle range emotional moments, more so than just the real dramatic ones.” lenses—to me, that’s more typical of what most amateur photographers Kevin achieves this trademark style by building up trust with his shoot with. You can set your images apart that way from amateur photogra- tried-and-true lineup of Nikon digital cameras: the Nikon D70, D2x and phers—of course, hopefully your image quality is better, too!” the D200. The powerful D2x has stood by Kevin for many of the emotional “I do’s,” and it hasn’t let him down yet. “The D2x’s main advantage is that it tends to focus extremely fast, especially if you’re shooting quick sequences of images,” he says. “Plus, the autofocus system and low- light capability is great on the D2x. If you’re a real fast shooter, or you shoot a lot of moving subjects, the D2x has the ultimate advantage.” It’s the trust he builds with his clients, however, that most works It’s the new D200, though, that has Kevin clamoring to capture in tandem with his trusty Nikon gear. “Setting them at ease, from our the exchange of vows at the altar and the antics on the dance floor. initial meetings when they come into the studio to the way we deal “I’ve used the D200 almost exclusively on my last two weddings, with them on their big day, is paramount,” he says. “We give them © Kevin Kubota © Kevin Kubota and I love it,” he says. “The noise levels are much improved at the impression there’s nothing they can do wrong—we’re not going higher ISOs, and the shadows are really smooth. It’s a very nice to get stressed out if they’re late. If things aren’t going right we don’t camera for low-light work.” give them the impression that we’re stressed out or it’s a problem. The D200’s color rendition is stellar as well. “It’s probably a little They’re already stressed out as it is. I’ve seen a lot of photographers get more punchy than previous cameras, which I really like,” says Kevin. to take some pictures outside, I don’t have to worry about forgetting to stressed out, and that doesn’t help anyone. My wife, who works with me, “I shoot RAW, so I can customize how I want the colors to look when I switch it back down and about getting unnecessarily high-ISO images is the same way. She reminds the clients that everything will be fine, process the images. But I find the colors are very true with the D200—I “The full ISO feature hadn’t been outside (which I’ve done before in the past!). That’s a great feature. It even if things are completely haywire!” don’t have to do very much adjustment to get them to look right.” This feeling of trust ultimately helps Kevin pull out the emotions he perfected until the D200—now, when hasn’t been perfected until now in the D200.” One of the features of the D200 that has come in especially handy The camera’s light weight takes some of the physical burden off wants. “Timing and knowing what to watch for is for Kevin is the full ISO feature. “Basically, I use the auto ISO to the I move into a darker room, so important,” he says. “Being able to anticipate Kevin as he’s chasing after those fleeting matrimonial moments. “The lowest setting; then, in custom settings, I can indicate the lowest the camera automatically bumps what’s going to happen—a lot of that comes from D200 is definitely lighter and easier on your arm,” he says. “There’s also shutter speed I’m going to allow the camera to go to for hand-holding, the ISO up just enough to give me a vertical grip for the camera that I really like.” experience in shooting weddings. I’ve seen a lot of and the highest ISO I want the camera to pick,” he explains. “That the proper exposure, without me Kevin keeps his lighting simple, sticking to natural light whenever cool imagery, which I love, but to me, if your photos way I can leave it at the lowest ISO. When I move into a darker room, having to think about it.” possible. “Sometimes I use a pop-up reflector and a diffuser to diffuse touch your client, then you’ve really done something the camera automatically bumps the ISO up just enough to give me the sunlight,” he says. “If I’m shooting in a situation where I have to special.” § —KEVIN KUBOTA the proper exposure; it goes up or down as needed, without me having light it up, such as inside a church, I’ll just use the flash on-camera To see more of Kevin Kubota’s work, go to www.kkphoto-design.com. to think about it. If I’m shooting at 800 inside a church and then run pretty much.” © Kevin Kubota © Kevin Kubota © Kevin Kubota © Kevin Kubota
  • 35. More Than a Feeling The Cult of Personality Claudia Kronenberg uses her D2x and her new D200 to re-create the essence Cliff Mautner’s images look real, because the of the big day. moments are real—and they’re all achievable with his Nikon F6, D2x and D200 cameras. Part historian, part artist, and part technician: This is how Nantucket Island wedding photographer Claudia Kronenberg sees herself when says. “The autofocus is extremely decisive, and it locks beautifully.” she steps behind the camera. “I really try to translate my vision of Never one to pass up a challenge, Cliff was also recently able to the bride and groom’s day into the medium of photography,” she test-drive the new Nikon D200, even though Mother Nature was not says. “I want to re-create that ambiance—it’s not just about the as cooperative that February weekend. “It was the big blizzard of visual for me. It’s about that feeling the bride has when she walks 2006,” he laughs. “I took the camera and the couple out in the snow, into her tent at dusk with the candlelight glowing—I want her to get in the middle of Broad Street in Philadelphia. It was light, mobile, those goosebumps she first got when she walked into the room.” and easy to carry.” Claudia’s wedding workhorse is the Nikon D2x, which she first He was impressed with the D200’s image quality as well. “When I used on a bridal fashion shoot about a year ago. “I love the fast re- do high-end weddings, room and décor shots are very important,” he sponse focus of the D2x—it blows away any camera I’ve ever used,” explains. “There’s an allure to the creaminess of the files I get with she says. “And the large LCD is one of the biggest I’ve ever seen.” the D200—I just love the color rendition.” Other features of the camera she particularly enjoys: battery Audible and ISO noise are significantly reduced in the new D200. longevity (“the camera doesn’t eat away batteries—I can go through “I can see myself using the D200 for ceremonies, it’s so unintrusive an 8- to 10-hour day and only use one-and-a-half battery charges”); and quiet,” Cliff says. “I also believe it’s got a lower noise level in © Claudia Kronenberg terms of ISO noise. When I need to shoot in lower light, the D200 is the vertical shutter release (“I can just tuck my elbows in and it going to be my camera of choice.” © Cliff Mautner really helps save my shoulders”); and the camera’s handy highlight warning (also featured on the new D200). “You can put the warning The camera’s light weight also lends itself to a full day of nuptials on so that when your preview comes up after you take a shot, it will shooting. “The D200 can always be on my shoulder for a grab flash the highlight warning if you’ve overexposed—it’s perfect for bridal gowns,” she says. “I can look at my preview in a split second “When I do high-end weddings, and see if I’ve overexposed my highlights.” Philadelphia wedding photographer Cliff Mautner has plenty of pho- what I’m doing. I just dial it in, and I intuitively feel where I need to tojournalism experience—but he hesitates to label his shooting style room and décor shots are very In the end, though, it’s simply the D2x’s instinctual interface be. The D2x nails every exposure.” that helps Claudia get the shots she needs. “I shoot on manual, as strictly “photojournalistic.” “I like to achieve an artistic interpre- important. There’s an allure to the Claudia recently had the chance to try out Nikon’s new D200, and and I change my ISO and white balance for almost every scene,” tation of the day, taking some of the best of photojournalism with the creaminess of the files I get with the she can already envision what place that camera will hold in her traditional aspects of wedding photography mixed in,” he says. she says. “When you’re shooting a wedding, you’re constantly wedding workflow. “The D100 was my first digital camera—the D200 D200—I just love the color rendition.” running into a church, coming out of a tent, running to the Cliff’s M.O. for his natural-looking imagery: to bring out his feels like a perfected version of the D100,” she says. “It’s very quiet, —CLIFF MAUTNER beach. You have to really know intuitively where all your settings subjects’ true personalities. “The images look real, because the it has a nice-sized LCD, and the focusing system is tight and fast as moments are real,” he says. “I try to put people in the best lighting are. The D2x allows me to shoot without having to think about well. We shoot a lot of black-and-white in our studio, and it will be situations and the best compositional scenarios, and just allow them shot—it’s so convenient,” he says. “The lighter weight will keep me great to have the D200 as our designated black-and-white camera. to interact with one another.” fresher; I’m not going to be as tired after the wedding.” “The D2x allows me to shoot That way, when we upload our images and brides are viewing them, Using the Nikon D2x has proven a formidable factor in creating Cliff’s Nikon F6 continues to play an important role in his wedding we don’t have to convert anything to black-and-white.” without having to think about what his matrimonial montages. “There isn’t a better-handling DSLR on work, along with the newer digital gear in his arsenal. “I still love A full set of Nikon lenses accompanies her to every wedding, the market,” he says. “Coming from a strong film background, it was the look of black-and-white film, and I still love the look of color film I’m doing. I just dial it in, and I including the 17-55mm, the 28-70mm, the 70-200mm VR, and one a natural transition for me to go to the D2x. It fits right in with the for family portraits—I really enjoy the skin tones,” he says. “The F6 intuitively feel where I need to be. of her all-time favorites, the 105mm macro. “I was never a zoom instinctive factor of shooting—my mind’s eye doesn’t have to change really is the most incredible 35mm film camera that I’ve ever had in The D2x nails every exposure.” lens person until these lenses came out,” she says. “But another just because I changed cameras.” my hands. It’s amazing.” —CLAUDIA KRONENBERG photographer turned me onto the 70-200mm, and it was amazing. It Besides the camera’s superior 12.2-megapixel capabilities, Cliff Also in Cliff’s gear bag: his supply of Nikon lenses (usually the was so versatile and perfect for my shooting style.” is a fan of the D2x’s AF acumen. “The autofocus on the D2x is far 28mm f/1.4, the 50mm f/1.4, and the 85mm f/1.4). “I haven’t used Ambient light illuminates Claudia’s glowing brides, with a little superior to anything that I’ve ever encountered—it doesn’t miss,” he a third-party lens in 24 years,” he says. “I don’t remember the last help from her Nikon SB-800 Speedlight. “I like to use an SB-800 and time I had a lens in the shop.” dial it down for a light touch of flash so the natural light doesn’t Three SB-800 Speedlights also help cast a special glow. “One of look overly filled. “For instance, when I’m shooting people on the the things that’s most distinctive about my style is how I incorporate dance floor, I’ll put my ISO to 800, open all the way, put my shutter light into my images,” he says. “There are times I’ll go wireless and speed down, and balance a little bit of that with the SB-800 and it’s just use an SB-800 on my camera to set off another SB-800 as my gorgeous. You get all that warm, soft ambient light, but you freeze main light, to just give me the look of the light the action.” coming from a different direction, to add a With her Nikon system, Claudia is able to little bit of drama and texture.” successfully document that ethereal realm It’s the drama of the day that Cliff’s © Claudia Kronenberg newlyweds enter on the big day. “Brides ultimately out to capture. “I’m there to capture always say to me ‘I don’t feel like this is the essence of that couple, not just what © Cliff Mautner real.’ That’s my job as a photographer—to that couple looks like,” he says. “I want their re-create that essence for her.” § personalities to come forth.” § To see more of Cliff Mautner’s work, go to www.cmphotography.com To see more of Claudia Kronenberg’s work, go to www.claudiakronenberg.com.
  • 36. w © Michael O’Neill © John Solano © Damon Tucci edding edge 2009 TM © Cliff Mautner © Damon Tucci © Michael O’Neill ADvERtISING SECtIoN
  • 37. 1 THE When the D3 debuted last year with Nikon’s new FX-format CMOS sensor, it upended the wedding photography world. Not far behind were the D700 and the recently debuted D3X, a 24-megapixel masterpiece— both also sporting the FX-format NIKON D700 sensor and delivering stellar imagery that Nikon is known for. The D3 was the perfect culmination to a digital line that started with Nikon’s first-generation DSLR nine years ago. The camera’s groundbreaking FX-format CMOS sensor was nearly identical to the size of 35mm film, so pho- tographers were finally able to achieve the higher ISO sensitivity and wider dynamic range they had longed for from their DSLRs in a complete 12.1-megapixel package. It’s no surprise, then, that the D3 has been integral in convincing many professional wedding photographers to complete their transition to digital (see story on photographer John Solano on page 7). The camera produces high- high-quality images with extremely low noise throughout its normal ISO range of 200 to 6400. It also boasts a 51-point autofocus system with Nikon’s 3D Focus Tracking feature, as well as Nikon’s Scene Recognition System and improved focus algorithms that also contribute to the impressive performance of the AF system. The D3 is also, as Solano puts it, “built for speed.” After all, there’s no room for error when you have the father of the bride expecting every shot from his little girl’s moment in the spotlight to be magical. The D3’s shutter-release time lag is only 40 milliseconds, with a startup time of approximately .12 seconds. The camera is capable of continuously shooting approximately nine frames per second (fps) in full resolution with the FX format; up to 64 consecutive frames in JPEG (Normal compression); and up to 20 consecutive frames for NEF (RAW) files. THE D700: A MINI D3? So how could Nikon possibly top such an exemplary piece of hardware like the D3? Simple: Take the D3’s advanced photographic features and capabilities to offer true pro-level performance in a more com- pact, portable package. The resulting D700 is the perfect complement to Nikon’s flagship model, the ideal mate for when you’re trying to keep up with the newlyweds in the limo, at the cocktail hour, and on the dance floor. In addition to the same FX-format CMOS sensor that has catapulted the D3 to photographic re- nown, the D700 also offers 12.1 effective megapixels, Nikon’s EXPEED Image Processing System, the 51-point autofocus system with 3D Focus Tracking, Nikon’s Scene Recognition system, and two Live View shooting modes that allow photographers to frame a shot using the camera’s 3-inch high-resolution LCD monitor. One of the D3’s hallmarks is its outstanding image quality and high-ISO capabilities, and the D700 effortlessly adopts these capabilities for the same impressive tonal range and depth, as well as low noise throughout its native ISO range of 200 to 6400—a previously unheard-of feat on the big day. Wedding pros can now shoot with confidence, knowing that they can take on even the most challenging lighting situations (especially in combination with the new SB-900 Speedlight) during the nuptials. NIKON D3X The D700 system keeps up with the D3 in terms of speed, starting up in .12 seconds, with a shutter-lag response time of 40 milliseconds—exactly the responsiveness needed by an on-the-move wedding pro. The D700 can record full-resolution JPEG images at five fps, or eight fps with the optional MB-D10 battery pack for up to 100 images, or up to 17 lossless 14-bit Nikon NEF (RAW) files. The Nikon D700 is also compatible with the next-generation of high-speed UDMA CompactFlash cards for recording speeds up to 35 megabytes/second.
  • 38. PHENOMENON The D700 and 24MP D3X join the flagship D3 to raise the wedding photography bar even higher. It may have been hard in the past to track the bride as she’s leading the fast-moving conga faster recycling time, “intelligent” line, but the D700’s Multi-CAM 3500FX autofocus sensor module makes it easy. The 15 cross- features, simplified interface, type sensors and 36 horizontal sensors can be used individually or in groups, with the option for and user-applied firmware Single Area AF mode and Dynamic AF modes using groups of either 9, 21, or all 51 focus points. updates, in combination The system also features 3D Focus Tracking with automatic focus-point switching that takes with Nikon’s DX-format and advantage of all 51 AF points as it uses scene color content and light information to accurately FX-format camera systems, track the subject. further expand a photog- Worried about dust particles marring your money shots? New to the D700 is Nikon’s first rapher’s creative lighting self-cleaning system designed for the FX-format sensor. Utilizing four distinct vibration frequencies, possibilities and ensure that the D700 frees image-degrading dust particles from the sensor’s optical low-pass filter at startup, less-than-ideal lighting will never shut-down, or on demand. Plus, the mirror box and entire shutter mechanism are constructed of prevent a photographer from nailing those critical materials that resist creating debris that can affect image purity. emotional moments. The SB-900 offers unprecedented zoom-range A 24-MEGAPIXEL POWERHOUSE: coverage from 17mm to 200mm to increase THE NIKON D3X flexibility in a variety of shooting conditions, and Photographers have been buzzing for months about Nikon’s much-anticipated new “product,” provides photographers with advanced wireless but the recently announced D3X has surpassed all imaging expectations. This FX-format digital SLR i-TTL capabilities so multiple Speedlights can be boasts 24.5 effective megapixels for stunning, high-quality images, comparable to those you’d ex- used with ease at any wedding venue. A quick recycle pect from medium-format cameras. The camera gives photographers an ISO range of 100 to 1600, time of 4.0 seconds at full power with four alkaline AA expandable to 50 (Lo-1) and 6400 (Hi-2). The ultra-smooth tones and lack of grain at ISO 1600, as batteries drops to 2.3 seconds with four rechargeable well as at low sensitivity settings, result in smooth, natural skin tones and phenomenal detail. NiMH batteries. In its quest for ultimate image quality, however, Nikon didn’t want to sacrifice the mobility And talk about smart: When using the included fluorescent or incandescent filters and and ease of use of its flagship DSLR, so the D3X shares the same robust body and ergonomics as adapter, the flash recognizes what filter is being used and automatically adjusts white the D3. Like the D3 and D700, the D3X is superfast, shooting at up to five fps at full resolution or balance on the latest Nikon DSLRs. The bounce and swivel capability of the SB-900 has been up to seven fps in DX Crop mode, allowing photographers to catch the split-second difference in a expanded to include tilt up to 90 degrees, down minus 11 degrees, and a full 180-degree ringbearer’s expression or all of the action in a sequence. The D3X keeps the party moving with a swivel left or right, allowing for more creativity for on- or off-camera use (or as a remote startup time of .12 seconds and a shutter-release time lag of 40 milliseconds. Speedlight). Combine these camera characteristics with two Live View modes (Handheld and Tripod), the Other new features include: relocation of the controls for setting the wireless master high-density 51-point AF system, a 3-inch super-density LCD screen, and Nikon’s exclusive Scene and remote (now moved to the outside of the unit for easier access); simple adjustment of Recognition system, and today’s professional wedding photographer will be able to capture all the frequently used functions with a new Rotary Select Dial; a larger LCD screen that’s a snap matrimonial minutiae their clients demand. to read, even in direct sunlight; and “My Menu” hotkeys that photographers can assign for quicker access to commonly used functions. LET THERE BE LIGHT: THE SB-900 SPEEDLIGHT The D700, the D3, the D3X, the SB-900 Speedlight: They’re all part of the Nikon Complete Nikon’s Creative Lighting System recently became even more versatile with the addition Imaging System, and all phenomenal imaging tools in their own right. Use them together of the SB-900 Speedlight, a direct descendant of the popular SB-800 model. Challenging and in conjunction with the full lineup of NIKKOR lenses, however, and only your imagination lighting situations can be the bane of a wedding photographer’s workflow, but the SB-900’s will limit your creative possibilities. ◗ Nikon’s Capture NX 2 Building upon the revolutionary direct-on-image editing of the original Capture NX software that debuted in 2006, the new Capture NX 2 photo-editing software is loaded with several exciting new fea- tures, including the Selection Control Point tool (which lets you make nearly any image adjustment to a specific area with just a simple point-and-click); the Images © Michael O’Neill Auto Retouch Brush (an easy way to clear away spots, blemishes, or other unwanted distractions with just a few mouse strokes); and an updated user interface with four presets and a number of customizable workspaces to optimize screen layout. Original image Image after editing in Capture NX 2 For more information on the groundbreaking Nikon D700, D3, D3X, and other Nikon products, go to www.nikonusa.com.
  • 39. It’s no surprise that Cliff Mautner was recently named one of the top 10 wedding photographers in the world by American Photo magazine. He’s masterfully parlayed more than a quarter-century’s worth of photojournalistic experience into his wedding work, creating stunning imagery that’s replete with passion, energy, romance, and texture. To achieve these matrimonial feats, Mautner relies on Nikon photographic solutions, including the D3 and the D700, which he uses in tandem to ensure he doesn’t miss a single moment. “I don’t know where the technology’s going to stop,” he exclaims. “When the F5 came out, I didn’t think they could beat that, and then they came out with the F6, which is the best single-lens-reflex film camera ever made. Next came the digital versions, with each generation surpassing the next.” Mautner always brings two D3’s to every wedding. “The D3 is a bear—it’s the flagship camera,” he says. “I can’t do without the D3. I love the backup capabilities of this camera. I put a 16GB card in the second card slot and fire fine JPEGs as a backup onto that card; I fire RAWs onto an 8GB card in the first slot.” But while the D3 remains Mautner’s workhorse, he’s also integrated the D700 into his wedding-day workflow. “The D700 is the perfect complement to the D3,” he says. “I call it the ‘D3 Lite.’ Its capabilities are almost identical to the D3 with regard to focusing capabilities, ISO performance, an amazing LCD, and spectacular color rendition. I was shocked that Nikon decided to put all of these features in a nonflagship camera. It allows me to have a camera on my shoulder throughout every aspect of the wedding day.” In fact, the D700’s portability has become one of its ultimate assets, accord- ing to Mautner. “I want to be able to anticipate and react to any given situation I encounter,” he explains. “With the D700, it’s like it’s an appendage that I can barely feel. After 27 years of shooting, I’m able to wear this camera with ease throughout the entire wedding day.” The D700’s autofocus capabilities in combination with its ISO performance ensures Mautner is able to achieve what he sees in his mind’s eye. “I can go into just about any situation without a flash on camera and just react and pull out an image,” he says. “It’s a great way to capture decisive moments throughout the day in an extremely unobtrusive fashion. I’m able to capture moments that I hadn’t even thought about making before. For example, I’ll think nothing of having my 85mm f/1.4 lens on during a ceremony to capture the bride coming A Perfect Pair down the aisle and turning to the groom. I can have the ISO at 6400 and grab the groom’s reaction to the bride in an extremely dark church. Not only can the D700 perform in those low-light situations from an ISO standpoint, but it also focuses where other cameras have failed before.” These capabilities have dramatically changed the way Mautner shoots. © Cliff Mautner The Nikon D700 serves as the ideal complement “With this FX technology and these new sensors, my entire mindset is differ- to the D3 in Cliff Mautner’s wedding-day arsenal. ent,” he says. “I’m not just making pictures I haven’t made before, I’m thinking about things I haven’t thought about before—going out at night, for instance, © Cliff Mautner © Cliff Mautner
  • 40. and being able to focus in darker conditions and being able to shoot without a flash when the light level might be low but the quality of light is still strong.” It’s in the reverse situation (when the quality of light is actually lacking) when Mautner turns to his SB-900 1Speedlights. “There’s a huge difference between quality of light and quantity of light,” he ex- plains. “There are very few situations we encounter with these Nikon cameras where I can’t make a picture from a light standpoint. When the quality of light isn’t there, however, I turn to the Speedlight to create dimension, texture, and mood.” The new SB-900 has proven to be user-friendly and intuitive— important when you’re trying to cast the perfect light on a blushing bride. “The most obvious improvement to this Speedlight over its predecessor is the ease of use,” Mautner says. “It’s so much easier to use and, in my opinion, more efficient. What I mean is, I’m choosing to use this flash now without an external battery source—I’m just using lithium batteries in the flash, and I’m getting spectacular performance out of one set of batteries.” Mautner also applauds the SB-900’s remote sensor. “It still needs to be within line of sight, but it reacts in a more omnidirectional fash- ion that allows it to receive the master signal from more directions © Cliff Mautner than ever before,” he says. “I’ve experienced situations where my commander source has been well in front of my remote SB-900, and the SB-900 reaches just about any part of the room. That’s incredible. I demonstrated this at PhotoPlus: I kept moving further back with the remote flash until I was way up front setting it off with the D700, and the flash would set off. “ The D700’s master transmitter and built-in flash prove invaluable in combination with the SB-900 Speedlight. “If you only have one SB-900, you can still perform off-camera flash capabilities without having another flash to set off that Speedlight, because you can set it off with the D700 itself,” Mautner explains. Mautner brings out the SB-900 consistently throughout the wed- ding reception, using it remotely and setting it off wirelessly with the CLS (Creative Lighting System). “Anytime you can get it off the plane of your camera, you’re going to create a dimension that can’t be created when the flash shoots off a hot shoe,” he says. “The Nikon CLS allows you to create that dimension flawlessly.” The NIKKOR lenses in Mautner’s gear bag allow him to capture all of the day’s special moments—and to fully tap into the D3 and D700’s capabilities. “The 24-70mm and the 14-24mm are the sharp- est lenses I’ve ever used,” he says. “I’d begin a wedding day while the bride was getting ready, and I’d use nothing but prime lenses. Now © Cliff Mautner the 24-70mm lens replaces my 28mm f/1.4. The sharpness is unparalleled. Although I’m losing two stops, I’m making it up because the D700’s ISO capabilities allow me to make it up. And the 14-24mm is unbelievably crisp edge-to-edge. “ “I want to be able to anticipate c Mautner explains that the evolution of today’s DSLRs and other photographic technology has created a more level playing field for photog- and react to any given situation raphers at all levels, but that it’s the professional photographer who has I encounter. With the D700, it’s the skills to reap the most benefits. “It’s become more important than ever almost as if it’s an appendage of to set yourself apart,” he says. “It has exponentially magnified what I’ve myself that I can barely feel. I’m been able to do in the past, which is going into difficult situations that we able to wear this camera with ease encounter on a wedding day and coming away with strong images. Nikon equipment allows me to excel at that. throughout the entire wedding day.” “As a photojournalist, the responsiveness of the equipment can’t be understated,” Mautner continues. “The only way that a photographer can develop and refine his or her style is to make sure the equipment that’s used is 100 percent instinctive. You don’t want to think about how to make the picture—you just want to make it, with no steps in between. This equipment allows that concept to be more easily accessible. It’s now within reach to more photographers than ever before. It’s almost making it too easy. It’s raising the bar for everyone.” ◗ liff mautner To see more of Mautner’s work, go to www.cmphotography.com
  • 41. © Michael O’Neill Something Old, Something New © Michael O’Neill Photographic veteran Michael O’Neill leverages the technology that drives the Nikon Imaging System to produce wedding imagery that marries classic to contemporary. Michael O’Neill’s photographic style has been described I’m shooting a lot of candids. It’s also convenient when I’m as a blend of traditional elegance and contemporary styling. doing my handheld portraits. It’s very instinctive—all the “Photography is a lot more casual these days,” he says. “Even controls are right where they belong. As far as I’m concerned, though I follow traditional rules in terms of photographic it’s a mini D3 in a smaller package.” theory and composition, today’s bride and groom don’t want O’Neill shoots in the RAW format and enhances these files their album to look like their parents’ wedding album.” with Nikon Capture NX 2 software for maximum effect: “You While the Nikon D3 has allowed O’Neill to achieve the can actually previsualize ahead of time how an image is going cutting-edge imagery he’s known for, it’s also opened the to look. The original image of the bride against the yellow doors to new ways of shooting. “The D3’s strongest feature, wall (shown in the Capture NX 2 sidebar on page 3) has no which puts it head and shoulders above anything else that’s resemblance to the final image. It was a very light, pale-yellow out there, is the way it shoots in the high ISO ranges,” he says. wall; before I even made the exposure, I knew I was going to “It’s literally changed the way I take pictures. You can get a use the RAW image processing in Capture NX 2 to change the closeup portrait without having any noise in the image at color of that wall to a more vivid yellow. I knew the software ISO 1600.” would be able to do it perfectly—the U Point technology Being able to shoot in less-than-ideal lighting situations in that software is unbelievable. I saturated just the yellows has expanded O’Neill’s photographic capabilities. “The D3 while keeping the white in the bride’s gown and her flesh opens up thousands of new venues to me—areas that were tones pure.” marginally lit or that required a tripod are now places where O’Neill stresses that the technology offered by Nikon gear I can take casual, relaxed, animated pictures,” he says. “It’s can only be leveraged by people who understand the fun- also changed my attitude on lighting. In the past I used a lot damentals of photography (i.e., pros), but lauds the creative m of auxiliary lighting—now I find myself using a lot more possibilities for everyone. “The D3 and the D700 just make our natural light, which is sufficient coupled with the high ISO job as photographers so much more rewarding,” he says. “We capabilities of the D3. It’s definitely added a whole new can do things we only dreamed of in the past, or that we really dimension to my photography.” had to struggle for.” ◗ O’Neill is impressed with the D3’s auto white-balance set- “The D3 has opened up thousands ting. “In the past, I would be concerned about white-balance issues, like shooting in a shady environment,” he explains. “Pic- of new venues to me—areas that tures in those types of situations would have a blue cast. The were marginally lit are now places D3 on auto white balance does a better job than what I could where I can take do with a color-temperature meter. I do very little tweaking relaxed, animated of my color after the fact. I shoot everything in the NEF (RAW) pictures.” format, so if it does need a color-temperature change I can do it, but the color accuracy of the D3 is unbelievable.” The D700 has also found its way into O’Neill’s workflow. “The D700 gives me the same image quality that my D3 gives me,” he says. “Its compactness makes it so easy to use when ichael © Michael O’Neill o’neill To see more of O’Neill’s work, go to www.michaeloneillfineart.com
  • 42. Saying “I Do” to Digital The Nikon D3 convinces John Solano to finally make the ultimate commitment to digital SLRs. If ever there was a steadfast Nikon shooter, it’s John So- “Today with the D3, that expense is lano. He owns every body in the Nikon F Series of film cameras completely gone.” (“each generation kept surpassing my expectations”), and he Two new SB-900 Speedlights was a hybrid film/digital shooter since the first-generation have supplanted his tried-and-true Nikon DSLR burst onto the scene. But it was the arrival of the SB-800 models, which he now uses Nikon D3 that led Solano to officially annul his relationship as the remote dedicated slaves. “I with film. love the button controls and the “That camera was the one that pushed me over the whole new control scheme on the edge,” he laughs. “I can say without a doubt that it’s the SB-900’s,” he says. “Nikon really best pro digital SLR ever. This machine was built for speed. perfected the controls so they’re The continuous shooting capability, the buffering and the easier to understand and easier to card writing—it’s always ahead of me. Also, the focusing set. If you used the other Speedlight response is amazing, especially with the 24-70mm lens. The models, you’ll instantly know where autofocus tracking allows me to get shots that would have things are. And the recycle time ab- previously been out of focus.” solutely rocks without the accessory Solano hails the D3’s low-light capabilities. “It’s breathtak- battery pack. Sometimes during ing at 6400,” he says. “I show this camera to my friends who the party I’ll use an external battery are also Nikon shooters, and the high-ISO performance makes pack, but usually when I’m shooting them envious! This camera gives you great images even when light during the day, I’ll just go with your light levels are dropping like crazy. When you’re in a four cells in the flash.” position where you have to get great images, you don’t have The Speedlight’s expanded a choice—you have to have the best tool in the profession. rotating function enables Solano to © John Solano I can’t have the father of the bride having a better camera achieve what he wants to with the than me!” light that surrounds him. “I love the Solano, who shoots in the compressed RAW format, touts full rotation of the head—you can go the D3’s dynamic range and color accuracy. “It’s unbelievable,” a reverse 180 in either direction,” he he says. “Nikon has always been great with color balance and explains. “That’s paramount for when main lenses with the 16mm fisheye (“I like the distortion on exposure balance. The D3 is dead-on.” you’re bouncing the light off of any wall that’s around you— that one”), the 60mm Micro VR (for detail shots like the bride’s Solano owns not one, but three D3’s. “I like shooting especially when you have the camera in a vertical position. shoes, the wedding rings, and embroidery on the bridal 16GB cards in the RAID-like backup setting,” he explains. Before the flash only turned 180 degrees in one direction; now gown), and prime lenses like the 28mm f/1.4 and 85mm “Card failure is nonexistent now. People used to say, ‘You can’t it goes 180 in either direction.” f/1.4. “In the winter I go back more to the primes,” he says. “I shoot more than two gigs, you’re putting all your eggs in one Solano taps into his NIKKOR lens arsenal to capture all the need a tighter ISO, especially when it’s getting dark at 4:30 in basket’—but now I have two baskets! I shoot in compressed important moments of the big day. His favorites include the the afternoon. In the summertime, the f/2.8 lenses are more RAW, so that gives me about 1,600 compressed RAW images 14-24mm f/2.8 “(that’s my lens for tight spots, like dancing on than enough, especially with the higher ISOs on the D3.” on a 16GB card. If you didn’t have the backup, there’s no way a crowded floor”); the 24-70mm f/2.8 (“this is my all-around In the end, Solano strives to deliver consistently spectacu- you’d be putting 1,600 images on one card.” lens; it’s on one of the D3 bodies about 80 percent of the lar images to his clients. “I’m like a chameleon—I modify The financial benefits of the D3 are obvious as well. “Up time”); and the 70-200mm f/2.8, which is almost always myself to what today’s clients are asking for,” he says. “Aristotle until October 2007, I was still shooting all portraits on film, on a second D3 (“people don’t even know they’re being said, ‘We are what we repeatedly do; excellence is, therefore, and I had an $1,800-a-month film expense,” Solano says. photographed from 30 feet away”). He supplements these not an act, but a habit.’” It’s this habit of excellence that he shares with his Nikon equipment. ◗ j “The D3 is, without a doubt, the best pro digital SLR ever. It’s the camera that pushed me over the edge [from film to digital]. This machine was built for speed.” © John Solano © John Solano ohn solano To see more of Solano’s work, go to www.imagemakr.com
  • 43. Tender Twilight Damon Tucci captures midnight-blue moments with a complete Nikon-facilitated workflow. There’s a revolution taking place in the wedding photography arena, and Damon Tucci is excited to be an integral part of it with his Nikon D700 and D3. “With the original digital SLRs, the immediate feedback was great,” he recalls. “But either you could expose for the face and the dress would be blown out, or you could expose for the dress and the face would look dark. With these cameras, the dynamic range, the LCD, the tonality you can get—it’s almost like cheating!” Tucci characterizes his shooting approach as stylized fashion/documentary: “We’re trying to take a young, avant-garde, fresh approach. That’s been our mantra—to look at things differently and put a twist on it, a more contemporary feel.” Low-light imagery is one of Tucci’s trademarks, and an area where both the D700 and D3 excel. “One of my favorite © Damon Tucci times to shoot is at twilight, that romantic, midnight-blue time of day,” he says. “It’s way more consistent than the erratic sunsets we get in Florida: Every once in a blue moon, you’ll get this beautiful red orb you can look right into, but that happens like 10 percent of the time; the midnight blue of twilight happens almost every night for seven minutes, tonality throughout the image that will still be printable,” look at the histogram, do this, do that—this LCD is spot- so we try to work that into our photography. With the D700 he says. “Previously, I would shudder to go out in full on. The better feedback gives you better experimentation and D3, I can shoot at ISO 1600 (up to 6400 for certain sun—and if I did, I would have to bring a full strobe to and better capture, which is ultimately going to lead to journalistic shots) and get beautiful portraiture of the bride balance it. There was very limited dynamic range. I’d have better files and better work.” and groom that looks phenomenal. That was unheard of to work in real shaded areas but now that’s all changed. The D700’s portability has also come in handy. “If you’re even a year ago.” These cameras let you do things that you never thought traveling for destination weddings, the D700’s weight is a Tucci, who relies on his 24-70mm (“this lens is a would look good—you look at your images now and just definite advantage,”Tucci explains. godsend—it’s amazingly sharp”), 70-200mm, and 16mm say ‘wow!’” Tucci is looking forward to the next generation from fisheye lenses for the lion’s share of the wedding day, The instant feedback from the 3-inch VGA color Nikon. “I can’t even imagine what that’s going to be like,” he shoots everything on auto white balance (with the excep- monitor has also proven to be invaluable. “Just a few years says. “My photography had to adapt to technology, and now tion of tungsten inside churches). “I can shoot right into ago, you could barely see the LCD—now the LCDs on both it can get back to the art of it all again, because there aren’t the sun and get a nice flare coming down and have that cameras are huge!” he exclaims. “Previously, you’d have to those limitations anymore.” ◗ “With the D700 and D3, I can shoot at ISO 1600 (up to 6400 for certain journalistic shots) and get d beautiful portraiture of the bride and groom that looks phenom- enal. That was unheard of even a year ago.” amon tucci To see more of Tucci’s work, go to www.damontucci.com © Damon Tucci © Damon Tucci Published on behalf of Nikon Inc. by Cygnus Business Media, Cygnus Imaging Group Custom Publishing Department, 3 Huntington Quadrangle, Suite 301N, Melville, NY 11747. Designed by Marianne Pardal. Edited by Jennifer Gidman. TM © 2009, Nikon Inc., 1300 Walt Whitman Road, Melville, NY 11747-3064, U.S.A. www.nikonusa.com
  • 44. J    EVENTS  CSR   NEWS  REGISTER LENS   REBATES   SERVICE   FIND A DEALER    TAMRON LENS LINE › EXPERIENCE  › EXPLORE › ENGAGE › EXPRESS  ›   Enewsletter May 2010  Southern Exposure: How to Photograph in the Antarctic Region  John Luck uses the Tamron 18­270mm lens to pursue penguins, icebergs, and orcas  in his icy adventures to the bottom of the Earth. by Jennifer Gidman Always look for an Authorized Tamron USA  Images by John Luck  dealer.  See Why  ­­>  It’s a part of the world where few have ventured, but photographer John Luck has traveled to the frozen tundras of the Antarctic region 10 times. The expeditions he goes on are led by the 2041 group ( www.2041.com ), an organization dedicated to the preservation of Antarctica by promoting renewable energy, recycling, and sustainability. Luck serves as both a resident photographer and staff EMT on these trips.   “2041 is led by Robert Swan, the first person in history to walk both the North  and South Poles, ”  says Luck.  “2041 refers to the year that the  Antarctic treaty, which says that no one country has dominance over Antarctica or its resources, comes up for renewal. The trips, which usually last about two weeks, consist of educators, students, and scientists. On one of the trips, we spent a month helping to construct the first building down there that ran entirely on renewable energy. ”    Prep Work  Preparing for this type of adventure isn ’t like setting up for a simple photo junket in the United States.  “First of all, the trip itself is long,” says Luck. “I have to fly from Washington, DC, to Buenos Aires, Argentina; from there, I take another plane to a town called  Ushuaia , the southernmost city on the planet. Then I have to take a ship for three days—it’s a total of five days of travel just to get there.”  The weather is always a crapshoot when you travel to Antarctica, according to Luck. “In the 10 times I ’ve been there, the weather has been spectacular twice,” he says.  “The other times, there was constant snow, sleet, and wind, which can go up to 140 mph —it will tear the camera right out of your hand. The seasons are reversed, so right now the Antarctic winter is starting; my ship was the last ship right before the water started icing up. It will be November or so before the ships are able to go back there. ”  Due to these extreme conditions, it ’s important to pack the right gear —you’ll be surrounded by penguin colonies, not photo retailers, in Antarctica.  “I have all my camera gear in one bag, which includes two Nikon cameras; my main Tamron do ­it­ all lens, the  18­270; a fisheye lens; and a fast f/2.8 lens tele zoom,” Luck says. “The 18­270, however, stays on my camera 90 percent of the time. It’s difficult to shoot in that weather, so you don ’t want to be switching lenses a lot. In addition to the snow, there ’s a lot of dust down there, and a lot of salt spray. If you get spray on a sensor or mirror, you can ’t just go to your nearest friendly camera shop and get it cleaned.”  The 18 ­270 also comes in handy because of its versatile focal ­length range.  “If you’re bouncing around in a Zodiac boat, it ’s hard to switch lenses in the middle of pursuing an orca, ”  Luck explains.  “So many times I was able to get a shot no one else could because I had the camera and lens ready. One time two orcas were chasing a penguin, and they were all charging our Zodiac; the penguin ended up diving underneath our boat. Everyone else had these really expensive 300mm f/2.8 lenses, but the action was too close; they couldn ’t switch lenses in time; with the 18­270, I just went to the 18mm end and was able to capture everything that was happening there."   The 18 ­270’s Vibration Compensation abilities help Luck in situations where he ’s not able to set up a tripod.  “Most of the time I’m not in a position to use the tripod, ” he says.  “The VC definitely helps. Where I see it the most is in the eyes of the animals I ’m photographing. I always focus on the eyes, and if they ’re not in focus, the image isn ’t salvageable. With the 18 ­270, I get a higher percentage of sharp pictures. You can see this in one shot I took of a penguin —the catch light in the
  • 45. happening there."   The 18 ­270’s Vibration Compensation abilities help Luck in situations where he ’s not able to set up a tripod.  “Most of the time I’m not in a position to use the tripod, ” he says.  “The VC definitely helps. Where I see it the most is in the eyes of the animals I ’m photographing. I always focus on the eyes, and if they ’re not in focus, the image isn ’t salvageable. With the 18 ­270, I get a higher percentage of sharp pictures. You can see this in one shot I took of a penguin —the catch light in the penguin ’s eye was sharp as a tack. I can ’t imagine not having an image ­stabilized lens like this.”  Extra batteries are also key to a successful photo shoot in the harsh Antarctic environment.  “I bring three spare batteries, and I ’m always recharging them, ” says Luck. “If you have a camera with image stabilization, or if you ’re constantly looking at the monitor, it takes a lot of power to do that. It would be an unpleasant surprise if you come across that once ­in­a­lifetime shot and your battery ’s dead. ”  To protect his gear, Luck puts a UV filter or skylight filter on his lens immediately. “I keep a few spare filters, because if I drop my camera, I ’d much rather have the filter break than the lens, ” he says.   To keep his camera and lenses shielded from the brutal elements, Luck uses everything from garbage bags and Ziploc bags to specialty Kata protective devices. “The bags tend to give me the best access, ” he says.  “I’ve never used one of those waterproof housings they make, because I do change lenses on occasion, and it ’s hard to change lenses with the housings. These items keep the bulk of the salt spray off of my gear—if that gets on a multicoated lens, it takes forever to clean.”  Luck uses  microfiber cloths  to wipe down the camera and lenses while he ’s shooting.  “I carry about four or five of them, ” he says.  “When I get back to the ship at night, I wash every cloth —they dry in about an hour.”  Dealing with condensation on your gear can be tricky as well.  “If you ’re somewhere where it ’s 10 below zero, and then you clamor aboard a ship that ’s 78 degrees within a matter of minutes, you ’re going to get condensation developing, ” Luck says.  “A trick that’s worked for me is to wrap my camera up in a fleece jacket and put it on my bunk so it can slowly warm up. This keeps condensation from forming on the camera. An addendum to that: Don ’t forget your camera is there and pick up that fleece jacket from your bunk—I speak from experience! ”  Make sure you ’ve read your camera manual, know your gear, and have had adequate practice using it before you embark on your Antarctic adventure.  “I had given a talk to everyone on the ship about practicing and reading the manual, ” Luck recalls.  “Then one day, a rogue ­looking wave came at our ship. I whipped out my camera and got an incredible image of it splashing against the side of the ship. I asked if anyone else had gotten it. Everyone was just staring down at their cameras. There ’s no reason you can ’t practice at home by shooting the kids in the backyard or animals at the park. Or for a shot like the one I got of penguins leaping out of the water, you could practice by going to a soccer game and getting the feel of taking an action shot. Everyone else just got the bubbles on the surface or flat water, because they didn ’t quite grasp the penguins were five feet ahead; I was able to anticipate them bursting out of the water.”      Out on the Ice There’s no  “typical” day shooting in the Antarctic, because anything can happen. “You might get up at 5am because the captain will alert you there ’s an iceberg floating right off the side of the ship, ”  says Luck.  “Our ship had a pretty shallow draft, so we could get close to land. We ’d explore the historic sites, like the whaling stations —we ’d get into the Zodiacs and go to shore using a  ‘wet ’  landing, where you actually get out of the boats and pivot into the water before scrambling to land. Once we were there, we ’d spend the bulk of the day either doing research or photographing people picking up snow samples or mapping. ” 
  • 46. draft, so we could get close to land. We ’d explore the historic sites, like the whaling stations —we ’d get into the Zodiacs and go to shore using a  ‘wet ’  landing, where you actually get out of the boats and pivot into the water before scrambling to land. Once we were there, we ’d spend the bulk of the day either doing research or photographing people picking up snow samples or mapping. ”    Sometimes they ’d be alerted to a penguin colony or other wildlife in their path. “All the ships that take people to the Antarctic have signed a treaty that agrees to certain behavior in regard to the animals—you’re not supposed to get within 15 feet of them, ”  says Luck.  “If you get too close to certain animals, it puts them into a defensive posture that can burn too many calories. This can make or break whether they survive the winter.”  The animals, however, haven ’t signed the treaty, Luck laughs.  “I’ve been photographing and suddenly felt something tapping my back —it was a penguin, ” he says.  “They have no natural enemies on two feet, so there ’s no genetic, engrained fear of humans —they simply see us as tall penguins! We ’d spend several hours watching and chronicling their behavior. ”  But while the penguins may be safe, other indigenous species should be kept at a safe distance.  “The  leopard seal , which can weigh up to 1,200 pounds, eats penguins like they ’re a buffet, and they attack Zodiacs, ”  says Luck.  “Fur seals  are very aggressive and territorial, and their teeth are so bacteria ­laden that you ’re almost guaranteed to get an infection if you ’re bitten. You don ’t want to get bitten by one of those, since that would involve a $100,000 flight from the nearest military base back to land. ”  There are other hazards, too.  “Besides the dangerous animals, there are slippery crevasses you have to be wary of, ”  Luck says.  “Plus, the water is 29 degrees —you’d be unconscious within 15 minutes and dead within 40 if you fell in and no one could get to you. We don ’t want anyone getting hurt, so we make sure enthusiasm doesn ’t compromise safety.”      Lighting and Composition The lighting is wildly unpredictable in Antarctica, says Luck.  “This is one of the few circumstances when I have to check every single picture on the monitor because I don ’t have any idea if I ’m even remotely close to getting it right, ” he says.  “The intense light and the snow constantly throw off the meter. I ’m always going one stop under or over to properly expose for this. The cameras I ’ve used do have the ability to bracket, but not enough for what I ’d like—I wish I could get two stops. You just don ’t have the luxury of time there —this isn ’t a National Geographic shoot where you ’re there for three months. ”  The real photographic conundrum comes into play when Luck is trying to photograph something like a black ­and ­white penguin on white snow.  “It’s almost impossible to get the absolute correct exposure, ”  he says.  “I’ll use just a small amount of fill flash to differentiate the penguin from the background. Of course, use too much fill flash and it ’s going to look like you took the picture at a zoo, so you have to be really circumspect and not use too much. ”  Don’t do a double ­take when you see blue streaks on the ice through your viewfinder.  “When ice gets compressed over hundreds or thousands of years, it tends to become denser and reflect only blue light, ” Luck explains.  “Before I saw it for myself, I always thought people were amping up that color in pictures I saw, that the blue wasn ’t that blue, but it really is. ” 
  • 47. have to be really circumspect and not use too much. ”  Don’t do a double ­take when you see blue streaks on the ice through your viewfinder.  “When ice gets compressed over hundreds or thousands of years, it tends to become denser and reflect only blue light, ” Luck explains.  “Before I saw it for myself, I always thought people were amping up that color in pictures I saw, that the blue wasn ’t that blue, but it really is. ”    It’s hard not to take clich éd landscape shots, says Luck, but you can avoid this by reverting back to tried ­and ­true photographic axioms.  “People tend to take very basic pictures where they separate the water and the mountains and try to cut it exactly in half on the horizontal axis, which always makes for a boring picture,” he says.  “Use the rule of thirds like you ’ve been taught: Don ’t put the object of focus in the middle of the lens.”  Adding other elements into the image to complement the natural landscape will also enhance your pictorial.  “The scale of Antarctica is so epic, that unless you have something else in the picture for scale, you won ’t sense how big it really is, ” says Luck. “If I’m shooting an iceberg, I ’ll try to put a Zodiac in the foreground; if it ’s a landscape, I ’ll try to put a human or an old shipwreck or building into the image.”  Detail shots are also important to complement the sweeping frozen vistas you ’re shooting.  “Penguins, for example, leave amazing patterns on the ground when they walk,” Lucks says.  “Look at your own feet and see what you can photograph. Also, while you ’ll probably want pictures of people smiling, once you get those tourist shots out of your system, take shots of people actually doing something, like collecting samples.”    Look Around You Make sure to take plenty of photos, Luck advises.  “I had a shot of penguins splashing around in the water, ” he says.  “They were immature penguins who were mock­fighting and establishing their territory. However, I had to take about 40 shots to get that one shot I liked. With digital, you have no excuse not to experiment and take a ton of pictures.”    Even when you ’re back on the ship in between land expeditions, don ’t ignore the day ­to­day happenings taking place around you—after all, this is a trip that most people don ’t get to embark on during their lifetimes, so every little detail will be interesting to outsiders looking in.  “Sometimes when I ’m telling a story about an expedition to someone who hasn ’t been there, especially children, they ’ll ask questions like,  ‘How do you get off the ship? ’  (they lower a gangway, if you ’re wondering) or  ‘How do penguins go to the bathroom? ’ Those are the little things you want to take pictures of.  
  • 48. interesting to outsiders looking in.  “Sometimes when I ’m telling a story about an expedition to someone who hasn ’t been there, especially children, they ’ll ask questions like,  ‘How do you get off the ship? ’  (they lower a gangway, if you ’re wondering) or  ‘How do penguins go to the bathroom? ’ Those are the little things you want to take pictures of.     “Many people on these trips use those seasick patches, for example, which basically anesthetize you and turn you into zombies, ” he continues.  “So there were all these sleeping people all over the ship —I have a couple of shots where it looks like the ship of the dead, but it reminds me of that particular place and time and what was going on. ”  At night, don ’t just retreat into your cabin with a good book. “There are so many evening opportunities as well, ”  Luck says.  “You can photograph the lights of the ship, for example. Or maybe you can catch the bow of the ship as it ’s breaking into the ice. Many captains are agreeable about letting you take pictures from the bridge, so take advantage of that. There can be many dramatic, interactive shots to give you a sense of the place you were in. ”  But even with all of these photographic tips in mind, Luck saves perhaps the most unexpected one for last.  “If you’re hiking on the continent or in a Zodiac boat, at some point, just put down the camera, ”  he says.  “Look around, take it all in; absorb the incredible beauty of the Antarctic. There ’s not a camera made that can duplicate what your memory will retain for you on this once­in­a­lifetime adventure.”  PHOTO: Reps Only  | Dealers Only  (For Password info, please contact Tamron Sales Rep) | Viewfinder Readers  | Become a Dealer  |  Educational Purchase Program  | Service  | Digital Camera Lens  | Fundamentals | Photographic Lenses | What's Camera Shake?  | Digital SLR (DSLR)  | The Portrait Macro | Macro Photography  | Online Photo Sharing CCTV:  Reps Locator  | Become a Distributor  | CCTV Camera Lens Privacy Policy   Tamron  USA, Inc. Copyright (c) 2010. All Rights Reserved  10 Austin Blvd., Commack, NY 11725, Phone: 631.858.8400 | Fax: 631.543.5666 | Toll Free: 1­800­827­8880  Site by Skylar Design, Inc.  
  • 49.                View Cart   Items:       Total:  CAMERAS   CAMERA ACC.   TRIPODS   LENS   PRINT   STUDIO   SERVICE   STORES   RESOURCE   USED        Go      Email:       Sign Up     Sign up for a chance to win a $100 Gift Card!     <<< PREVIOUS POST  | NEXT POST  >>>                                                                                                                        SUMMER TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS: A three­part series brought to you by Tamron and Penn Camera     Part 3 Shooting Our National Parks In this installation of Tamron’s Summer Travel Photography Series, Sandra Nykerk offers tips and techniques for capturing the beauty and emotion in our country’s most awe­inspiring natural  treasures. By Jennifer Gidman Images by Sandra Nykerk     ­ Photofinishing    Volcanic landforms, granite domes, gushing geysers, and  ­ Digital Services    majestic waterfalls are just some of the natural wonders  ­ Repairs    you’ll encounter during a trip to a United States national  ­ Nikon Professional Services    park. Photographer Sandra Nykerk is intimately familiar  ­ Video Services    ­ Rental    with these geological gems: The self ­described  “visual  ­ Tips & Tricks    anthropologist ” merges her background in environmental  ­ Seven Tips for Putting Your  history, photography, and cultural anthropology during her  Best Face Forward   forays into the parks’ diverse scenery, resulting in  ­ Natural Selections    astounding images that showcase Mother Nature at her  ­ DSLR Know ­How with  finest. Tamron : Episode 9   ­ Photographing Flowers      ­ Turning Your Photography  “It’s hard to choose, but my favorite park has to be Yellowstone —it’s never the same place  Hobby into a Business   twice,” she says.  “I love the surreal nature of Death Valley. The Smokies are incredible for  ­ Emily Wilson Shoots a  scenics and landscapes, especially in the spring and fall. And the Everglades is one of my  Portrait   very favorite places for birds.”  ­ Olympus PEN E ­PL1      ­ The Beauty of Nature  Photography   Read on for Sandra ’s tips for taking memorable photographs that avoid clich éd shots and   ­ Give Your Photos a Fresh  allow you to capture your own unique experience in the  Start  parks. ­ Curing Cabin Fever with Kid    Friendly Photo Projects     ­ Shooting eBay Photos that  Prep before you head out into the deserts and canyons. Sell   The more research you do before your trip, the better — ­ Tips for People Who Hate  whether it ’s talking to people who have been to the park  Photo Editing   ­ Why a Photography Hobby is you’re heading to before, reading every book and magazine  Good for Women ’s Health    you can get your hands on, and using the Internet. The best ­ Small Accessories that  online sources are the individual park Web sites —they’re a  Produce Big Results   wealth of information. Yellowstone, for instance, puts out a  ­ Tips to Minimize Flash Delay spiral­bound resource book for the naturalists that work in  ­ Photographing Pets    its visitors’ center. Now the same book is also on the park ’s  ­ Spring Break Photography  Tips   Web site for anyone to access: It offers information like  ­ On the Hunt for Great Easter where to see the best wildlife, where the best thermals are, Photos   etc. Other major national parks are doing similar things.  ­ Pose Like the Pros      ­ Olympus PEN E ­PL1 Tutorial:   Interchangeable Lenses   Flickr is another great online resource. You can type in  ­ Tamron 18 ­270: Vacation,  whatever place you ’re going to, and thousands of images  Travel & Events   will turn up. These will help you get a sense of what the  ­ 10 Tips for Aspiring Baby  Photographers   landscape is like, what you ’ll see, and what places should  ­ Keep your verticals straight!   be high on your priority list to shoot. Research the kinds of images that appeal to you and  ­ You Go into Photography  that you gravitate toward, and then look to see what equipment was used to make those  with the Camera You Have,  images and where they were taken. From there, if the information is available, try to figure  Not the Camera You WISH  out if the photographer was facing east or west, if it was a morning or afternoon shot —then  You Had ….   plan accordingly for your own shots. ­ How Much Resolution Do I    Need for a Good Photo?     ­ Olympus Video: Art Filters    ­ SUMMER TRAVEL  Pack smart.  PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS: Part 1   My philosophy is if I’m driving and I own it, it’s in the car—at  ­ SUMMER TRAVEL  least I’ll have access to it. If I’m flying, that’s a whole  PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS: Part 2   different story. But I wouldn’t go anywhere without a wide ­ ­ SUMMER TRAVEL  angle lens, a medium telephoto, and a macro lens. I use the PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS: Part 3   Tamron 10­24mm wide angle, the 18­270mm VC lens (that’s  ­ Black Rapid RS ­4 Camera  Strap   been my just put­it­on­and ­shoot lens), and the 60mm  ­ Sandisk Video HD    macro lens (which is great to travel with since it ’s so short  ­ Nikon D90 review    and light). I also base what lenses I bring on the particular  ­ Nikon S8000 Review    park I’m going to visit: For example, if I know I’m going to  ­ Hardigg Storm Case  ­  Yellowstone and want to shoot some grizzly bears, I ’ll pack  iM2700   the longest lens I own (maybe a 500mm).     If at all possible, take an extra camera body: Don ’t go on a once ­in­a­lifetime trip with one  Get One! Olympus E ­P1   camera body. Time and again, I’ve seen those single camera bodies that have never had  any trouble at all suddenly die during these once ­in­a­lifetime trips. Sure, it’s easier than    ever to get your hands on backup equipment these days, but you don ’t want to have to wait for a new camera to arrive when you’re only spending a few days at one park.     Definitely bring a cleaning kit. Yellowstone, for example, is dirty —if it’s windy, you’ll have  silica dust blowing all over the place. You want to be able to clean your camera on a regular  basis. There are also these plastic camera covers you can get for like $7 that are designed  to protect cameras from the rain, but I use them to fend off the dust and dirt.   Don’t leave home without your camera manual. Today ’s cameras can be so complex, even  with features you understand. When you actually get out in the park, there ’s going to be  something you ’ll need to look up, especially if it’s not a feature you use day in and day out.       I’ve always been the tripod queen —no one in my workshops is ever allowed to go out     without one! For the highest possible quality and to be able to make the image as large as  possible, I’ll bring a tripod with a cable release, especially for quality macro work. That said,  Username: there are some instances when you just can ’t use a tripod —I’ve been in fields of cacti where
  • 50. to protect cameras from the rain, but I use them to fend off the dust and dirt.   Don’t leave home without your camera manual. Today ’s cameras can be so complex, even  with features you understand. When you actually get out in the park, there ’s going to be  something you ’ll need to look up, especially if it’s not a feature you use day in and day out.       I’ve always been the tripod queen —no one in my workshops is ever allowed to go out     without one! For the highest possible quality and to be able to make the image as large as  possible, I’ll bring a tripod with a cable release, especially for quality macro work. That said,  Username: there are some instances when you just can ’t use a tripod —I’ve been in fields of cacti where Password: there would be no possible place to put a tripod down. However, with the Tamron VC lenses and the quality of the ISOs on these newer cameras, I can handhold for images I never   go     clear would have been able to do just a few years ago.   Forgot your   username/password? Respect the landscape and other visitors. In Yellowstone, you’re not allowed to stop  just anywhere on the side of the road, and  you can’t just get off the boardwalk in the  thermal areas. As a nature photographer,  you have to understand the landscape and  the habitat. It’s your responsibility to respect that landscape and make a commitment that  nothing you do is going to damage that  habitat. So, if you’re in a sensitive thermal  area, for example, you might not be able to  just wander off.    Obey the posted rules and regulations and  respect your fellow visitors. One big pet  peeve is people who see something they  want to photograph and abandon their car in the middle of the road with all four doors  open —you’ll see like 80 of these a day during crowded times. It gets especially challenging  when you have a lot of tourists who don ’t speak or read English well, because they ’re not  able to read the posted rules, and they ’re excited and distracted to begin with being in such  a marvelous setting.    Avoid the crowds. Don’t go to the parks in July or August. Go in the shoulder seasons if you can: May or early  June, and September through October. Going in the winter is also a great idea, especially  because even the shoulder seasons are starting to fill up. You’ll find fewer people and very  different weather conditions during the colder months. Yellowstone and Yosemite are both  awesome in the winter, as are Arches and Bryce Canyon. And you ’ll practically have Death  Valley all to yourself!   If you do go in a more heavily trafficked season, go out early in the morning and stay out  late. By the time the majority of the tourists get up and get the kids fed, it’s 10:30 or 11 in  the morning. Likewise, most of them will head back to the hotel and have dinner and put the kids to bed in the late afternoon/early evening. So if you’re out at sunset, the clouds will  start to dissipate and you ’ll get some amazing shots. Midday is not good for photography  usually—both in terms of the crowds and the lighting.       Understand and break free of the clichés. In our national parks, the views are often  prescribed for us: There are specific pullouts  that constrain where you can stop, how you  can stop, and what you can see. These are  the places that have become our iconic  imagery. The Snake River Overlook in the  Grand Tetons used to be just a minor pullout  before Ansel Adams took his picture there.  Now if you go there, there’s an interpretive  sign with Ansel’s image on it: You’re no  longer testing the image against the reality;  you’re testing reality against the icon. You’re  going to be disappointed you didn ’t see the  “real thing” you recognize from Ansel ’s  image, and if you try to duplicate his image, you don ’t take away your own experience.     Take in these socially prescribed views, then go out and find your own. This comes from  understanding the landscape and its intimacy, internalizing that intimacy, then externalizing  it in the form of an image. If you don ’t feel, you can’t communicate emotion. Without  emotion, a photograph is simply a record.   Get off the beaten path. One way to find your own view is to get off of the roads where you’re allowed to. In the  Smoky Mountains, an astounding percentage of people never get out of the car. In  Yellowstone, another significant percentage of people never get more than 200 yards from  the road. Just by getting on a trail and walking, even if it ’s just a half mile, will give you  images most other people aren’t going to get.     Experiment with your lenses.  The 10­24mm, for example, is going to give you a wider view than most other people  shooting at the park are going to be able to get, because they ’re not using that kind of a  wide lens. Shoot very low with a wide ­angle lens to place a lot of foreground in the image;  shoot at a high aperture like f/22 to get a lot of depth of field in that foreground. The  alternative to that is to use your longest lens to shoot landscape details you can’t get to  physically—that will work great at picking up details in the landscape. Most people won’t use their long lenses for that —they think they’re just going to photograph animals with those  types of lenses.    Change your perspective. The world was not created at your eye height: Get down off of the tripod if you ’re using one, bend down, find something to climb up on, so that you ’re shooting from a different angle  than 90 percent of the population.   Go for the details as well as the panoramic shots. The truth is always in the details. While those wide, sweeping vistas are overwhelming and  take your breath away, they often don ’t communicate the true emotion of the place. An  abstract of a thermal pool or a piece of grass in the autumn—those are the things that  communicate the intimacy and passion of a park.    Add people into your shots. People can be part of the landscape and part of the story you ’re telling, whether it ’s your  own family or other people who are visiting the park. Even if it ’s just a shot showing how  crowded the park is, that’s still a visual reminder of your experience there. Incorporating  people into your shots can also add context and a sense of scale.   Learn to read the light.
  • 51. abstract of a thermal pool or a piece of grass in the autumn—those are the things that  communicate the intimacy and passion of a park.    Add people into your shots. People can be part of the landscape and part of the story you ’re telling, whether it ’s your  own family or other people who are visiting the park. Even if it ’s just a shot showing how  crowded the park is, that’s still a visual reminder of your experience there. Incorporating  people into your shots can also add context and a sense of scale.   Learn to read the light. You can take an extraordinary subject in very ordinary or  glaring light, and you’ll get an unimpressive image. Or, you  can take a very ordinary subject and extraordinary light and  get that once ­in­a­lifetime image. Understanding that you’re  not shooting things, you’re shooting the light on things, will  leapfrog you into a whole other platform of photography.   Head out early and stay out late to take advantage of those magic hours surrounding sunrise and sunset. Don ’t discount  stormy weather, either: While most people will stay inside  and have a cup of coffee when it’s overcast, you can go out and take some great pictures.     Understand what your histogram is telling you and use it incessantly—if you don’t know  where your histogram is, get out your manual and figure it out. The histogram is your best  friend. If you’re shooting JPEGs, it’s even more critical that you pay attention to your  histogram and white balance to get the right exposure.   I do sometimes use flash for macro, but only as fill to add a little sparkle, or on a person for  a catchlight. However, if you can tell I’ve used a flash (or a filter, for that matter), I ’ve failed.     Shooting in the desert is deceptively hard: It ’s difficult to translate that vastness into a  three ­dimensional image. Five minutes after the sun comes up, the light is flat and dead. By  the time the cactus flowers are in bloom (they don’t open till they’ve had sun on them for a  couple of hours), it’s the glariest time of day and the winds are blowing at 30mph. Be  prepared for this if you ’re shooting in parks like Death Valley or the Mojave National  Preserve.   Shoot at the lowest possible ISO. All things being equal, always shoot at the lowest possible ISO (in other words, the native  ISO for the camera). The higher the ISO, the more noise in the image, and the more difficult  time you’re going to have in post ­processing. For my camera, the native ISO is 200. I go to  400 only when I need to, and to 800 only when I ’m desperate.     Of course, if it’s a matter of being able to get the shot, go higher. Think of your end use: If  you’re just going to be putting the images on the Web or e ­mailing them to friends, don’t  worry about going higher on the ISO. However, if you’re planning on creating a 16x20 to  hang on a gallery wall, you’ll want to minimize the noise.      Use filters wisely.  I use polarizing filters much less than I used to, because the sensors seem to be sensitive  to blue light at the altitudes I work in —they sometimes make the sky too dark. Plus, in  Photoshop, I can come close to mimicking the effects of the polarizing filter without that  disadvantage.    However, there are instances when you need to use a polarizer: In the thermal areas of  Yellowstone, for example, you need one to cut the glare off of the water and saturate the  colors underneath. And, contrary to what we were taught years ago, a polarizer can have a  huge effect and beautifully saturate colors on a cloudy day: Just because the sun isn't out  doesn't mean that you don't need the polarizing filter. I ’ll often put the filter on and decide  whether or not it ’s a good idea; I also use my polarized sunglasses to judge how much of an effect a polarizer would make on the final image.   I’ll make a judgment in the field as to whether or not I should use a graduated neutral­ density filter or whether the end effect I want can be accomplished in post­processing. This  comes from experience and knowing your post ­processing/Photoshop skills and limitations.  I’ll use regular neutral ­density filters to slow down the shutter speed so that I can get  special effects (e.g., especially blurry water for a dreamy effect).   Maximize your time by going for quality, not quantity. I lived at Yellowstone for a while, so I could go in every day for two weeks to capture the  height of the blooms or colors; most people, however, are probably only coming for a few  days and, understandably, want to shoot everything possible in the park in those few days.  That’s an enormous challenge.     Prioritize and allocate your time. You have to take a deep breath and know that a few great  pictures of a few wonderful places or objects is better than 1,000 mediocre pictures of every  location you hit in the park. Quality is much better than quantity. If you have limited time,  spend it in limited places. This is where that pretrip research I mentioned early comes in—it’s so important for this prioritization.   For more information on Sandra ’s work, go to http://www.sandranykerk.com.      Tamron 18­270mm VC Voted Best Travel Lens 2009­2010 The world’s only 15X zoom lens! Tamron ’s perfect all­in­one lens features VC, Tamron’s image stabilizer for blur­free shooting without camera shake at up to four stops slower than usual. The lens offers a convenient, comfortable and versatile all ­in­one solution  that is ultra light (19.4 oz.) and just 3.8 ” long. It's the ideal zoom lens to pack for your  next vacation. Tamron 6­Year USA warranty and $80 mail­in rebate when purchased  from Penn Camera.               <<< PREVIOUS POST   | NEXT POST  >>>             about us  |  photo links  |  tips & tricks  |  employment opp.   |   contact us   |   shipping  |  returns  |  disclaimer  |  privacy policy              
  • 52. n celebration of our 85th Anniversary, Interstate + Lakeland Lumber has opened the doors to a new state-of-the-art, high-end custom showroom built in the original woodworking shop from 1922. The unique post and beam renovation blends seamlessly with the existing space to provide a gallery-style setting. Experience premium windows, doors, hardware like never before. What Dream Homes Are Made Of ™ See fine custom millwork in the “River Room.” Our knowledgeable staff is on hand to answer Interstate Design Center 184 S. Water Street · Greenwich, CT any of your questions and provide solutions to your building challenges. 1-888-499-8889 www.interstatelumber.com | www.lakelandlumber.com Information + Map of Showroom Sit, relax and discuss ideas away from the noise and clutter of a jobsite. GREENWICH · STAMFORD · BETHEL · SHRUB OAK · CROTON FALLS
  • 53. Map of Manufacturer Locations within Showroom
  • 54. enter keyword(s) or titles Professional Photographers Retailers & Labs Home Magazines News Calendar Buyer's Guide Video Network Community Classified Subscribe We love controversy! imaginginfo's Eye­Openers photo blog will serve as your guide to photography issues­no matter how controversial­ photo show news  and breaking news. It is written by the four expert photo editors of our photography magazines (Studio Photography & PTN) and website (imaginginfo.com)   Archive for the 'Jennifer Gidman' Category « Previous Entries Taken for Grant­ed  Tuesday, March 17th, 2009   You are currently browsing the    Leave A Comment archives for the "Jennifer Gidman"  category. With all of the recent hubbub surrounding  Shepard Fairey’s artistic rendering of a  Barack Obama photo, it made me start to think of all of the iconic photos of past    Categories presidents. There ’s JFK having a powwow with Nikita Khrushchev. Then there’s  E­mail this Post to a  Alysha Sideman  ( RSS )  Richard Nixon bidding adieu to the White House. And who can forget this rather  Friend  Diane Berkenfeld  ( RSS )  amusing montage of past commanders ­in­chief enjoying Thanksgiving dinner or  Jennifer Gidman  ( RSS )  pardoning the National Thanksgiving Turkey.   Tara Propper  ( RSS )    Archives But in today’s 24/7 media­saturated environment, where a global leader can make the slightest public misstep and in  seconds see his faux pas posted online for the world to see, it’s easy to forget about the relative visual anonymity  March 2009   many of our earliest forefathers enjoyed. We can view George Washington on the bucks in our wallet, but we ’d be  February 2009   hard­pressed to find any type of actual photo of him toiling over the Constitution, or of Thomas Jefferson enjoying an  January 2009   afternoon at the fishpond at Monticello.  December 2008     November 2008   That’s what makes the  possible discovery of a photograph of Ulysses S. Grant, our 18th president, such an  October 2008   astounding find. Collector Randall Spencer claims that the mid­1800s daguerreotype is the real deal, acquired at the  September 2008   San Jose Photographic Exposition in 1992 from a collector who had a whole stack of sixth­plate daguerreotypes.   August 2008     July 2008   Spencer stands by his find, and a forensic photo expert has backed him up. But it ’s been a hard sell, mainly because  June 2008   historical institutions often want an  “unbroken chain of custody ” to prove an artifact is genuine.(Spencer says that a  May 2008   system that acknowledges probability would better serve such efforts). If he is able to sell the photo, Spencer will  April 2008   use the funds to continue what he’s referred to as his obsessive quest to find other remnant photos of historical  March 2008   figures. Nice job, Spencer, and for a noble cause — just don ’t dig up anything that would incriminate our founding  fathers too much. The country needs some optimistic news right now, not Monica ­gate II circa 1802.  February 2008     January 2008   Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | No Comments »  September 2007   August 2007   July 2007   Street Artist Takes On AP Over Obama Photograph  June 2007   Wednesday, February 11th, 2009   March 2007     Post or View  By now, everyone ’s seen the  Obama “Hope” image that was used on posters and  Comments (13) January 2007   other campaign paraphernalia during last year’s presidential race. Street artist    November 2006   Shepard Fairey manipulated a pensive photo of now President Barack Obama, turning  E­mail this Post to a  October 2006   an ordinary photograph into a red ­, white ­, and blue ­infused work of art. Fairey’s  Friend  XML Feeds already ­iconic image has even inspired a pop ­culture sensation through the  RSS 2.0 (with MP3 Enclosures)   Obamicon.Me website, which lets you upload your own photo and type in your own  Atom 0.3  (with MP3 Enclosures)   descriptor at the bottom of the image (you can even order a poster, T­shirt, mug, or stamp with your “Fairey­ized”  likeness through the site).  More Information   About   Problem is, the Associated Press owns the copyright to the original Obama photograph, which was taken back in  2006 by photographer  Mannie Garcia. The AP wasn ’t happy about this and made public statements that hinted at    Search   possible lawsuits against the renegade California artist. The agency was subsequently taken by surprise, however,  when Fairey actually filed his own lawsuit this week against the AP, claiming that his work is protected by the Fair  Use Statute, which allows limited use of copyrighted material to make original works of art. Fairey and his supporters  argue that he visually transformed the original photo to convey a completely new meaning.     Whether Fairey has a valid case in taking this David ­versus ­Goliath preemptive strike against AP to protect himself  remains to be seen (and believe us, he needs all the help he can get in fending off the law—he was  just arrested in  Boston a few days ago for  “defacing property with graffiti ”). Posts on several blogs range from siding with the AP  (Fairey should have sought permission before using an agency ’s intellectual property; to defending Fairey ’s creation  (Obama always has that look on his face —does AP own that expression?; AP is not suffering any financial loss due to  Fahey ’s image). What do you think? Was it fair usage on Fairey’s end? Should he have filed suit against AP to protect  himself, or was that just going overboard? Tell us your thoughts.     Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 13 Comments »  Back to Basics — No Computers Allowed 
  • 55. (Obama always has that look on his face —does AP own that expression?; AP is not suffering any financial loss due to  Fahey ’s image). What do you think? Was it fair usage on Fairey’s end? Should he have filed suit against AP to protect  himself, or was that just going overboard? Tell us your thoughts.     Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 13 Comments »  Back to Basics — No Computers Allowed  Monday, January 12th, 2009     Post or View  The digital revolution (it seems so antiquated to even call it that anymore) opened the  Comments (3) doors for many to enter the photographic arena, but it also jump­started a quiet yet    cranky undercurrent that chastised those who used Photoshop and other technological  E­mail this Post to a  thingamajigs as a crutch instead of as subtle enhancement.   Friend    Professionals certainly had a valid gripe: After all, now even posers could manipulate,  twist, and finagle photos with user ­friendly hardware and software in attempts to create art, whether or not they  had the vision or talent necessary to pull it off. Sometimes, the technology paved the way for hidden genius to erupt,  but more often than not, it simply let loose a gaggle of layer ­crazy wanna ­bes who used every toolbar, gadget, and  gizmo to create a chaotic hodgepodge that would be unrecognizable in its raw format.    That may be why the exhibit mentioned in the New York Times’ New Year ’s Day edition is so refreshing. Entitled  “First  Doubt: Optical Confusion in Modern Photography,” the showcase at Yale highlights more than 100  “confounding ”  photos from the mid­19th century to the 21st century. They ’re puzzling, strange, eye ­catching—and totally  unmanipulated. That’s right: According to the article, there was no digital trickery involved in any of the images. All  the photos were exactly as the professionals saw them through the lens.     It’s an experiment in surreal comprehension—and a shout ­out to old­school photography done the way it should be.      Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 3 Comments »  Auld Lang Syne, 2008  Monday, December 8th, 2008     Post or View  Here we find ourselves once more, at the end of another megapixel­filled year, hoping  Comments (2) that Santa (or whatever gift­bearing mascot or family member you choose to affiliate    with) will stuff our stockings with digital frames, rechargeable batteries—maybe even  E­mail this Post to a  the new  Nikon D3X (I’m not holding my breath on that one, though maybe my  Friend  husband actually does read my blogs like he says he does).     It’s been a challenging year, and rough times may still be ahead for many: We ’ve officially been notified that we are  indeed mired in a recession,  and many around us have lost their jobs, tapped into their dwindling 401Ks, and been  forced to cut back all around. In the spirit of the season and in an attempt to spread a little humor and good cheer  during these difficult times, I leave you with my top 5 photo­related stories of 2008, stories that caught my attention  either because of their inspirational nature or because of their inherent inanity or bizarreness.    5. Jill Greenberg, meet John McCain: The avant ­garde New York City photographer made an international name for  herself by manipulating photos of the Republican presidential candidate originally shot for “The Atlantic” magazine,  with the intention to cast him in as unflattering a light as possible (and considering he most closely resembled the  craggy­faced Emperor from “Star Wars,” it appears Greenberg fulfilled her mission). Whether you sided with  Greenberg on the platform of free speech or rebuked her for unethical behavior unbefitting a professional  photographer, everyone can agree that it resulted in some of the more passionate posts in the blogging community  we ’ve seen in a while —and passion in the photography industry is just what we need right now.      4. As homo sapiens, we tend to carry a bit of species ­specific narcissism. But National Geographic’s Best Animal  Wildlife Photos of 2008 reminded us of how dangerous and beautiful our creature companions can be —and that we  share this planet with them.     3. You can mash them, dice them, bake them, even cut them into crinkles and fry them—but 2008 was declared the  International Year of the Potato by the United Nations, so it naturally followed that there be a photo contest to  document this titillating tuber.     2. Who can forget that iconic 1945 WWII photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt of a nurse being swept off her feet in Times  Square by a sailor right after the surrender of Japan? Well, the Navy didn ’t forget, honoring the young woman in the  photo (the now ­90­year­old Edith Shain) this past Veterans Day.     1.After the public outcry that took Annie Liebovitz to task for provocatively draping a nearly nude Miley Cyrus in  nothing but a blanket for her Vanity Fair shoot, the teen phenom recently came out and said that she ’d “love” to  work with the  “amazing ” photographer again. No hard feelings, I guess —and who am I to argue with Hannah  Montana?     Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 2 Comments »  A LIFE­time of images  Monday, November 17th, 2008   Haven ’t gotten around to scanning and digitally archiving some of your old photos,  Leave A Comment even though you know it ’s the right thing to do (or, at least that ’s what certain  magazine editors and other industry pundits keep telling you)? Well, stop making    excuses —after all, if LIFE magazine can manage to scan and upload 10 million of their  E­mail this Post to a  most personal images, surely you can clean out that snapshot ­laden shoebox sitting in  Friend  your hall closet.    In what is being touted as one of the largest professional photography collections on the Web, LIFE is making  available its photo archive through a new  hosted image service from search­engine behemoth Google. Even more  amazing than the sheer bulk of the project itself is that 97 percent of the images have never been seen by the public.  
  • 56. magazine editors and other industry pundits keep telling you)? Well, stop making    excuses —after all, if LIFE magazine can manage to scan and upload 10 million of their  E­mail this Post to a  most personal images, surely you can clean out that snapshot ­laden shoebox sitting in  Friend  your hall closet.    In what is being touted as one of the largest professional photography collections on the Web, LIFE is making  available its photo archive through a new  hosted image service from search­engine behemoth Google. Even more  amazing than the sheer bulk of the project itself is that 97 percent of the images have never been seen by the public.     Viewers can check out handsomely mustached  Civil War hotties on display in the 1860s section; browse through  iconic photographs of Pablo Picasso, Franklin Roosevelt, and Marilyn Monroe; and travel back in time to see photo  documentation of the  1930s oil boom, Vietnam War, or the World’s Fair. And web surfers trolling for photos can  hail from all walks of life from all over the planet: the search keywords have been translated into 16 different  languages.     Plus, if you’re in the market for some high­end artwork (if only to impress your high ­falutin’ friends), you’ll also be able  to purchase fine­art photographic prints through Qoop.com, an online sales portal.     LIFE also announces the most comprehensive offering to date to purchase fine art photographic prints online. The  general public will now have access to buy LIFE ’s famous photography through QOOP.com, a leader in online art  sales.     The project is far from complete—at last count, LIFE had only posted a few million of its archived photos (the staff  hope to have all 10 million up in the next few months). But it ’s yet another masterful melding of art and technology,  joining two powerhouses in their respective industries. Photos are meant to be shared, and what better way to  share them globally than by tapping into the Google machine?    Now get to work on that shoebox of yours.     Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | No Comments »  Dial­a­Photo  Wednesday, October 15th, 2008   So by now you’re probably a master at texting on your fancy cell­phone QWERTY  Leave A Comment keyboard, and a pro at downloading ringtones. You ’ve also surely taken more than a  few pictures with that handy in ­phone camera of your kids, your friends, your dog. And    while your “Albums” file probably doesn ’t have a lot of pictures that rival those you’ve  E­mail this Post to a  taken with your real digicam, perhaps there are a couple that show some artistic  Friend  promise, a strange technological aesthetic that can only be achievable in the heat of  the moment (when you don ’t have your real camera with you and have to rely on the  ol’ horn).     Well, now all those who have clicked and captured on the go can get their change to show off their skills to the world  with a unique new exhibit being held by the Brandt Gallery in Cleveland, OH. The  “At The Cellular Level — Cell  Phone Photography as Art” showcase, scheduled to open next month, will be comprised of cell ­phone photography  from both everyday amateurs and (supposedly) professionals. Interested parties simply have to download images  from their phone and send them to cellphonephotoshow @ yahoo.com, or e­mail them directly from their phone.    I anticipate most of the submissions will be from the amateur side, closet imagers who will test their creativity  without having to outlay any money for new equipment. I’d like to think most people who own cell phones already  have one with a built­in camera, though I sheepishly admit that I just updated my own dial­up dinosaur at the Sprint  store over the summer (I was basically laughed out of the store when they saw how old my phone was).    I don’t think many professionals, on the other hand, will be entirely pleased with the quality of their captures, at least  compared to what they ’re used to getting on a daily basis in the studio or on location. However, there may be some  pros who view this as yet another unique visual medium with its own requisite challenges; others may be drawn to  the raw, on ­the­fly nature that cell­phone photography necessitates.     it should be interesting, at any rate, to witness what comes out of this exhibit. I can’t ever see a pro trading in his or  her Canon or Nikon for a Samsung or Nokia, but we could have a new creative outlet on our hands in its own right.    Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | No Comments »  Back­to­School Memories  Thursday, September 4th, 2008     Post or View  Pumpkin and apple spice, vibrant pressed leaves, the crisp air of a late ­September  Comments (1) evening (at least here in the Northeast), the jack­’o­lanterns and cornucopias    dominating the seasonal aisle at Target — these are all harbingers of autumn, signs  E­mail this Post to a  that it’s time to kiss the summer goodbye and start planning for the cooler months  Friend  ahead.   It’s also time for back ­to­school photos and (shudder) time to enter the planning stages for holiday pictures and  greeting cards. My two children were born in August and September, so I ’ve got to set up birthday portraits as well,  or I’ll never hear the end of it from my mother.      For the past three years, I’ve been too tired/lazy/unmotivated/frazzled/cheap/add­your­own ­”bad ­mother”­adjective ­ here to hunker down and do the research to select a professional photographer who could adequately capture the  essence that defines each of my kids. Instead, I ’ve done what many others have done in similar moments of  desperation: I ’ve gone to the in ­house studio of a well ­known national baby retailer.     Now, this isn’t to say said retailer has done a bad job. I have some really cute images of my son sitting in front of a  faux lighthouse, my daughter draped in pearls. And, amazingly enough, they ’re smiling (and sitting!) in all the photos.  Plus, the prices have been fairly reasonable. 
  • 57. For the past three years, I’ve been too tired/lazy/unmotivated/frazzled/cheap/add­your­own ­”bad ­mother”­adjective ­ here to hunker down and do the research to select a professional photographer who could adequately capture the  essence that defines each of my kids. Instead, I ’ve done what many others have done in similar moments of  desperation: I ’ve gone to the in ­house studio of a well ­known national baby retailer.     Now, this isn’t to say said retailer has done a bad job. I have some really cute images of my son sitting in front of a  faux lighthouse, my daughter draped in pearls. And, amazingly enough, they ’re smiling (and sitting!) in all the photos.  Plus, the prices have been fairly reasonable.    But as the years have ticked by, a nagging feeling has started to set in. I ’ve noticed that the lighting in these shots  leaves much to be desired, with harsh shadows evident throughout. I ’ve also started to feel cramped by the images  I’m able to order: While the photo session itself is free, you ’re only allowed to pick a few poses to create prints from,  and the limited packages makes it nearly impossible for me to put together a customized a la carte package I’ve been  happy with.   And while the smiles are precious, every pose and picture angle is pretty much exactly the same in all the images.  There’s not much originality and, frankly, not much personality. Plus, the interaction between the store  photographers and my kids is lacking — while the staff certainly tries hard, they ’ve usually been young employees  with little to no photography experience trying to rush through the shoot to accommodate the growing line of cranky  people at the studio. They ’re usually forced to resort to chasing my son and daughter around the studio with a  feather duster to try to eke out one half ­smile. If that one trick doesn ’t bring the desired results, they usually look to  ME to evoke the perfect expression (and after a full day of spilled goldfish, bedroom brawls, and preschool attitude,  I’m usually feeling less than inspired).    In other words, all this time I’ve settled for a hodgepodge of mediocre imagery. So I ’ve started to do the research to  track down a pro in my area. I know I ’ll have to pony up a little more dough this time around (hmmm …gas in the tank,  or an extra few sets of 5×7s for the grandparents?), but from interviewing many child and family portrait  photographers, I know that in return I ’ll likely get a more­relaxed session that won ’t feel rushed; lighting that  adequately illuminates my little angels; creative closeups and precious poses; and a pro who ’s been around the  kiddie block and knows how to appeal to and calm my kids down (as well as how to calm ME down).   That way, when my two tax deductions head off to college in a decade and a half, and I’m wallowing in my empty  nest, trolling through the family albums and scrapbooks, I’ll be able to relive these fleeting days through every  mischievous expression and missing­tooth grin that only a professional could truly capture. And I ’ll know it was worth  it. Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 1 Comment »  Uploading Angst  Thursday, July 31st, 2008     Post or View  While I now love the convenience that consumer photo­sharing and printing sites such  Comments (2) as Snapfish and Shutterfly offer, I admit that I haven ’t always been in love with the    online process.  E­mail this Post to a    Friend  I consider myself pretty technologically savvy for a thirtysomething mom: I navigate my  iPod with ease, I text ­message my husband and friends, and I can even figure out how  to fix my MacBook laptop when things go awry (forget about PCs, though — they’re a whole different animal). Yet  when I first joined the online photo portal world four years ago when my son was born (I ’m a Snapfish member), I  was annoyed by some of the glitches that I soon encountered during my uploading endeavors.    For a supposed time ­saver, using this type of online service didn ’t seem that convenient when I had to check each  individual photo in my image library, a process that wasted many a summer afternoon when I should have been  playing with my infant. Plus, more often that not, I would finally finish uploading all the images, only to find that half  of them hadn’t uploaded correctly, or at all.     Now I know that I’m not the only one who has felt this type of photographic frustration. A new study by digital media  management company Memeo shows that other consumers are also working around the kinks and conundrums that  still plague some of these online solutions. The study found that some of the respondents’ biggest gripes were the  time it takes to upload photos (36%) and that family members who want to access these photos can’t figure out how  to use the sites (19%). (I can certainly relate to that last point  — I don’t even want to reveal how many hours I ’ve  spent in an e ­mail trail with my 80­year­old grandmother trying to explain to her how to see her great ­grandkids on  her computer screen as she tries to mouse around the Snapfish or Flickr screen.)   To be fair, things are much better these days than they were during the last Summer Olympics  — I’m happy to report  that I can now select multiple photos at once to upload, go stir the Classico, and come back a little later to view all  my albums online. The service I use (still Snapfish) now offers a ton of gifts, photo books, and other photo  accoutrements that keep me shopping for hours (I especially love the collage­poster option  — I’ve started a tradition  of creating a 20 x 30 version every holiday season to showcase my family’s favorite photos from the entire year,  which I display next to the previous year ’s version in our hallway).    Most telling (and most disturbing to those of us in the industry) from this Memeo survey, however, is that a whopping  79% of respondents revealed they have taken digital pictures they ’ve intended to share, but never did. The photo  industry still has a lot of work to do in terms of educating consumers and eliminating the intimidation factor. Only then  will photo sharing reach its full potential online. Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 2 Comments »  Free Trade?  Monday, June 23rd, 2008     Post or View  Photographers of all levels will soon be able to check out Photrade.com, a free new  Comments (1) site (now in the private beta stage) where users can  “share, protect, and make    money.” Not only can you display your images, you can also sell stock, prints, and  E­mail this Post to a  merchandise through the site ’s Adcosystem, an ad ­supported system that pays photo  Friend  owners for every image view (unlike storage sites like Flickr, which allow you to 
  • 58. Monday, June 23rd, 2008     Post or View  Photographers of all levels will soon be able to check out Photrade.com, a free new  Comments (1) site (now in the private beta stage) where users can  “share, protect, and make    money.” Not only can you display your images, you can also sell stock, prints, and  E­mail this Post to a  merchandise through the site ’s Adcosystem, an ad ­supported system that pays photo  Friend  owners for every image view (unlike storage sites like Flickr, which allow you to  maintain your galleries in cyberspace, but don ’t pay you a penny for it).    Both amateur photographers and pros are invited to sell their images in a fully protected environment (all images are  watermarked to prevent misuse or theft). If selling is your goal, photographers can pick a suggested minimum price, a  suggested marked ­up price, or a custom price. You can also earn money through an ad ­revenue setup (either  through banner ads in your gallery or in the images themselves, and from splash ­screen ads). This ad ­revenue  service is similar to the newly launched Dimpls site, which allows users to place logos and ads next to relevant  pictures to get click­through cash.   These two services (especially Dimpls) are obviously more geared to amateurs who don’t want to give away the  photo farm for free (though isn’t sharing the real goal of posting your images online? I don’t even consider how much  money I could be making off of the kids’ snapshots that I upload for Grandma and Grandpa to view in Florida). And  how much money can I really make anyway?   I am curious to see if (and how many) pros would actually use Photrade.com (the site keeps emphasizing that it’s for  professionals, too, though I ’m hard­pressed to see why any pro would want to  “compete” with your average Joe in  selling his or her images here). Consumers and strapped ­for­cash companies will likely be checking out sites such as  these (and there will be more), instead of having to pony up their pennies for more expensive online stock houses. Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 1 Comment »  Dude, Where’s My Camera?  Wednesday, May 21st, 2008     Post or View  You can never have too many megapixels  — or can you?   Comments (1)     Ask the consumers who may soon get to test­drive the Gigapan, the world ’s first 1­ E­mail this Post to a  billion­pixel camera.  Friend    Yes, you heard correctly  — 1 billion pixels.     Call it the Iron Man of imaging. A tripod­mounted robot commands the uber ­camera to capture several hundred  photographs of a single scene, all from a slightly different angle. This creates, in effect, a panoramic 3D experience  that’s unmatched by any other camera on the market. An image taken with the Gigapan retains phenomenal  sharpness even as you zoom in and out of different parts of the image (think Google Earth).    Not that the beta product is without its detractors — early grumblers are commenting on everything from the time  involved (it could take 10 to 15 minutes to capture 350 mini ­images needed to pull together the composite final) to  how the camera deals with moving objects to the fact that less­glamorous prototypes with motorized mounts have  been used for years (and probably for a lot less money than the Gigapan ’s likely price tag — though the word is that  the camera will be less than what existing current high ­res panoramic cameras go for).    Who came up with this piece of technical wonderment? It may sound like something straight out of a Marvel comic  book, but it’s NASA, Google, and National Geographic who receive the kudos in this case.     Now if they could only get  Robert Downey Jr. to endorse it, they ’d have an unstoppable sell. No official word yet on  the Gigapan ’s price or release.      Speaking of celebrity endorsements, I’ve caught a few of Nikon ’s new  TV spots starring easy­on­the­eyes actor  Ashton Kutcher. Nikon’s products have always been hot in my book, but the heat just got turned up with the  appearance of Mr. Demi Moore in the ad campaign hawking the stylish, fashionable COOLPIX compact digicam line.    Let’s just hope viewers don ’t think they’re being Punk ’d. If they can take their eyes off Ashton’s sexy stubble for  1/250th of a second, they’ll see that the underlying message is not just about the trendy COOLPIX colors — it also  emphasizes the cameras ’ performance, simplicity, and quality.     In other words, there is substance beneath the veneer — something that’s sometimes lacking in a world where  anyone can buy Photoshop and go to town on a photo.     Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 1 Comment »  « Previous Entries Eye Openers is powered by  WordPress All content  © www.imaginginfo.com This blog is protected by  dr Dave's Spam Karma 2: 18870  Spams eaten and counting...  Podcast Powered by podPress (v8.8)
  • 59. Share   Next Blog» Create Blog   Sign In   TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2010 WHO WE ARE More Cartoons for Everybody! We're parents, but we're so  much more than the beaten­ If you haven't heard  down remnants of our former  about it already, a  selves that we appear to be. We  number of blogs are  have faith that one day our  blog­reacting to an  shattered hopes and dreams will  article in the Wall  be resurrected. Street Journal that  claims that "good  parenting is less work  FAVORITE PARENTING and more fun than  BLOGS people think." Checking the Electrical Box  The nuggets of  Why Is Daddy Crying?  wisdom from the  Nucking Futs Mama  author, Bryan  DadLabs: Taking Back Paternity  Caplan, an  economist, include "Parents also strive to turn their children  into smart and happy adults, but behavioral geneticists find  WE'RE ON FACEBOOK little or no evidence that their effort pays off" and "Once you  AND TWITTER! realize that your kids' future largely rests in their own hands,  Head over to Facebook  you can give yourself a guilt­free break."  (http://www.facebook.com/insi devoiceblog) and follow us on  I'll admit that I don't read as often to my kids as I should. In  Twitter  fact,  Read more...  (http://twitter.com/InsideVoice POSTED BY ANTHONY AT 12:03 AM 0 COMMENTS Blog) to become an Inside Voice  LABELS: BRYAN CAPLAN , CARTOONS , CONVENTION PARENTING fan and receive regular updates  W I S D O M , MORE on our exclusive postings, site  news, and other general insanity  that goes on around here. Also in the news... JOIN US If you'd like to subscribe to  Inside Voice, the parenting  blog that nine out of ten  l Andy would be proud: Toy Story 3 opens up Pixar's  guardians prefer as their  biggest weekend yet. source for alternative  l But those Shrek Gogurts taste so much better than  parenting content, pony up  those '70s­inspired Scooby Doo Gogurts! Kids attracted  your e­mail address to receive  to junk food by favorite cartoon characters. said alternative parenting  content: POSTED BY 4 9 5 L I V E AT 12:00 AM 0 COMMENTS LABELS: NEWS , TOY STORY 3
  • 60. biggest weekend yet. source for alternative  l But those Shrek Gogurts taste so much better than  parenting content, pony up  those '70s­inspired Scooby Doo Gogurts! Kids attracted  your e­mail address to receive  to junk food by favorite cartoon characters. said alternative parenting  content: POSTED BY 4 9 5 L I V E AT 12:00 AM 0 COMMENTS LABELS: NEWS , TOY STORY 3 Subscribe MONDAY, JUNE 21, 2010 Delivered by FeedBurner Monday Morning Video Welcome: "It's the  Plumber..." Here's yet another one of those "if you're around my age  you've seen this one and now it's stuck in your brain again"  videos. Follow this blog This one is from the old Electric Company, which I never  quite enjoyed as much as Sesame Street. The story is, the  plumber drops by to fix the sink, and a parrot sends him into  cardiac arrest. The part I love best is how they actually show the guy  convulse and collapse, complete with the X's for eyeballs.  And they say today's cartoons are violent!  POSTED BY ANTHONY AT 12:02 AM 0 COMMENTS LABELS: M O N D A Y M O R N I N G V I D E O W E L C O M E , THE ELECTRIC COMPANY Also in the news... FOLLOWERS BLOG ARCHIVE l So much for a drama­free Open: Heckling banners fly  ▼  2010 (199)  ►  July (1)   overhead as Tiger putts. POSTED BY 4 9 5 L I V E AT 12:00 AM 0 COMMENTS ▼  June (32)  LABELS: CELEBRITY ALERT , NEWS , TIGER WOODS Now THAT'S What I  Call "Fighting Irish"   Also in the news...   FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2010 Also in the news...   Also Known as "Smelly Dad's Day" Monday Morning Video  Welcome: "None Some  I haven't worn cologne since college, and that was only  All"   because my brother handed me a jug of Benetton because  everyone was a Polo man back then. Also in the news...   Also in the news...   The only other time I wore anything perfume­y was in ninth  Also in the news...   or tenth grade, when my parents bought us small bottles of  English Leather for Christmas, and I applied too much, and  More Cartoons for  Cindy Silverman, who was like four lockers away, was  Everybody!   all, "Ew, are you wearing cologne?," which compelled me to  Also in the news...   pour the rest down the drain. Monday Morning Video  Welcome: "It's the  When I was re­gifted that Benetton juice, I applied it very  Plumber......   sparingly — just a damp fingertip's worth. When I either lost  Also in the news...   or ran out of the stuff, I never wore cologne again. To me,  cologne is for guys going to the club or men who are old  Also Known as "Smelly  enough to grow a decent mustache, but apparently it's still a  Dad's Day"   viable Father's Day gift. (Not too many dads are hitting the  Also in the news...   clubs.) Also in the news...  
  • 61. Also in the news...   or ran out of the stuff, I never wore cologne again. To me,  cologne is for guys going to the club or men who are old  Also Known as "Smelly  enough to grow a decent mustache, but apparently it's still a  Dad's Day"   viable Father's Day gift. (Not too many dads are hitting the  Also in the news...   clubs.) Also in the news...   Fortunately, my kids haven't bought me (that is, my Jenn  Just in Time for Father's  buying on their behalf) any cologne yet. But if they want to  Day!   buy me a tie, I have no problem with that. I wear ties. Just  Also in the news...   include a return receipt.  Also in the news...   When the Shoes Can  POSTED BY ANTHONY AT 12:03 AM 0 COMMENTS LABELS: COL OG NE , FATHER'S DAY , GIFTS , PERSONAL ANECDOTES House Goldfish, It's  Time to Wo...   Monday Morning Video  Welcome: The Mirror  Also in the news... Scene Fro...   Also in the news...   Maybe I Can Make My  Toddler a Champion  Competitive...   Also in the news...   l Are you feeling particularly '80s today? Check out the  Also in the news...   trailer for the new Smurfs movie. Also in the news...   l Don't let your babies ever see the light of the sun! FDA  The Mother  warns parents about Vitamin D OD'ing in infants. Said, "Spoohw!"   Also in the news...   Monday Morning Video  Welcome: Billy Boy   Also in the news...   Take Me to Your Leader, I  Mean Father   Also in the news...   Also in the news...   l Alice in Wonderland for the iPad: Children's book apps  proliferate. Also in the news...   l Top child­labor offenders are listed by IPEC as Africa,  ►  May (29)   the Arab States, and ­­ West Michigan?  ►  April (34)   ►  March (37)   ►  February (31)   ►  January (35)   ►  2009 (310)   ►  2008 (1)   PARENTING l CELEBRITY  RESOURCES (IN CASE ALERT: Forget about  YOU NEED MORE HELP the fact that Levi looks  THAN WE CAN alarmingly like Joran  PROVIDE) Van der Sloot on a very  About.com: Parenting  good, non­killing­spree  American Academy of Pediatrics  day ­­ Bristol's baby  daddy is back in the co­ Babble.com  parenting picture to  Baby Center  take care of Tripp. Berkeley Parents Network  Boys Town  POSTED BY 4 9 5 L I V E AT 12:00 AM 0 COMMENTS LABELS: CELEBRITY ALERT , IPAD , JORAN VAN DER SLOOT , L E V I Cafe Mom  JOHNSTON , NEWS , SMURFS Cookie Magazine  Disney Family  Family Corner 
  • 62. take care of Tripp. Berkeley Parents Network  Boys Town  POSTED BY 4 9 5 L I V E AT 12:00 AM 0 COMMENTS LABELS: CELEBRITY ALERT , IPAD , JORAN VAN DER SLOOT , L E V I Cafe Mom  JOHNSTON , NEWS , SMURFS Cookie Magazine  Disney Family  Family Corner  THURSDAY, JUNE 17, 2010 FamilyEducation.com  Also in the news... Fathering Magazine  Huggies Baby Network  iVillage Parenting  KidSource  MedlinePlus  Momlogic  More4Kids  VIRAL VIDEO: My son wasn't much interested in  Pampers Village  l the World Cup ­­ until it was shown in "Legovision,"  Parent Dish  vuvuzelas and all. Parent News  l Lohan controversy of a different kind: Rajo Devi  Parent­Teen.com   Lohan (no relation to Lindsay, Dina et al.), world's  Parenthood.com  oldest mother, said to be dying 18 months after giving  Parenting  birth. Parenting on Shine (from  Yahoo)  Parenting Teens  l VIRAL VIDEO: Like daughter, like mother: Gabby  Sidibe's mom wows judges on America's Got Talent. Parents.com  l You won't see this on Leno: Cop punches 17­year­old  ParentsConnect (Nickelodeon)  in head ­­ for jaywalking.  The National Parenting Center  l WTF, MOM AND DAD? Parents leave 5­year­old in  Ultimate Parent  car while they get high on crystal meth. WebMD Parenting Center  POSTED BY 4 9 5 L I V E AT 12:00 AM 0 COMMENTS BLOG TOP SITES LABELS: A L I C E T A N R I D L E Y , AMERICA'S GOT TALENT , GABBY SIDIBE , LEGO , NEWS , V I R A L V I D E O , VUVUZELA , WTF MOM AND DAD Parenting Blogs   WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16, 2010 Just in Time for Father's Day! In case you'd forgotten  what a wonderful dad  Joe Jackson was to his  children, the man half­ responsible for giving the  world Latoya has finally  solved the mystery of  who killed Michael. It was his wife,  Katherine! At least that's what he  told News of the World.  He probably first accused  Tito until the newspaper paid him enough to point the finger  at his spouse. He told the paper, "I said [to Katherine] this would have  never happened if you had went and been with him." Maybe Joe is right. Maybe plenty of things wouldn't have  happened to Michael if only Katherine had been with him.  Maybe Michael wouldn't have been addicted to painkillers.  Maybe Michael wouldn't have had questionable relationships  with boys. Maybe Michael would have had a normal 
  • 63. Maybe Joe is right. Maybe plenty of things wouldn't have  happened to Michael if only Katherine had been with him.  Maybe Michael wouldn't have been addicted to painkillers.  Maybe Michael wouldn't have had questionable relationships  with boys. Maybe Michael would have had a normal  childhood, rather than an abnormal arrested development.  Maybe Michael wouldn't have been beaten all the time by his  own father. Maybe none of this would have happened to Michael if  Katherine had been with him. But maybe none of it would  have happened to Michael if Joe wasn't with him. POSTED BY ANTHONY AT 12:03 AM 0 COMMENTS LABELS: JOE JACKSON , KATHERINE JACKSON , MICHAEL JACKSON , OUTRAGE Newer Posts  Home  Older Posts  Subscribe to: Posts (Atom)   
  • 64. BOO’S DIET TIPS (Tuna) Fish Out Of Water The other day, I had a sudden craving for tuna. I decided to whip up a batch of low-calorie tuna and enjoy an open- faced sandwich. I always use tuna in water (tuna in oil is way more caloric, and you’ll get more of the omega-3 fatty-acid benefits with water- packed tuna) and fat-free mayo (you won’t even taste the difference once it’s all mixed together). I blend in celery for added crunch. Choose a low-calorie cheese to top it off and you’ve got a sandwich done right, on the cheap in calories and cost. Wash it down with a refresh- ing glass of Crystal Light over ice for the perfect summery luncheon. Open-Faced Tuna Sandwich 2 slices Wonder Light bread 80 cal 1 small can tuna in water 70 cal 2 tbs. fat-free mayo 20 cal 2 sticks celery 10 cal 2 slices Smart Beat cheese 50 cal Crystal Light 5 cal Total Only 235 calories Old style: People may think that a tuna sandwich is automatically healthy—after all, it’s just fish, right? Not if you make it the old-fashioned way, where you’ll add on 120 calories for two slices of bread, 170 calories for a small (3-oz.) can of oil-packed tuna, 190 calories for 2 slices of fatty American cheese, and up to 200 calories for a couple of tablespoons of regular mayo. The Math: Save yourself up to 450 calories like I do every time I make an open-faced tuna sandwich. One sandwich is filling and I still get all the cardiovascular and brain benefits of eating this omega-3-rich food! AGAIN BE HUNGRY I’LL NEVER INSTANT Boo Grace, Katonah, NY BEST SELLER S L IM S AT IS F IE D About Boo! Boo Grace is the author of AN D S E X Y 56 AT AT the successful new book: Slim Satisfied and Sexy, an Instant Best Seller! AT 56 B OO G RAC E Available now at Borders in Mt. Kisco & on-line at Amazon.com PSTEIN ATHAN E DR. JON A C E B O O G R D FOREWOR B Y F. C E C I L & Available Now at: Amazon.com & Borders of Mt. Kisco W W W. S L I M S AT I S F I E D A N D S E X Y .COM
  • 65. BOO’S DIET TIPS Join the Club! This American standard is not only one of my favorite sandwiches—it’s also been the sandwich of choice for country club, hotel, and resort guests since the late 19th century. I like to consolidate the calo- ries in this multilayered meal by opting for premium-quality lunchmeats (try Hillshire Farm ham and turkey, for example) in between fiber-rich light bread. Supplement with a slice of turkey bacon (half the fat calories of pork bacon), a couple of tomato slices (I love those antioxidants!), fresh iceberg let- tuce, and a dollop of fat-free mayo for all of the creaminess of a regular club sandwich without all of the accompanying calories and fat. Club Sandwich 2 slices light bread 80 cal 2 slices Hillshire Farm ham 20 cal 2 slices Hillshire Farm turkey 16 cal 1 slice turkey bacon 20 cal 1/2 cup iceberg lettuce 3 cal 2 slices tomato 10 cal 2 tbs. Kraft fat-free mayo 20 cal 100-calorie pack Lorna Doone cookies 100 cal Total Only 269 calories Old style: Stack ham and turkey slices (up to 140 calo- ries) in between slices of white bread (120 calories), top it with regular mayo, pork bacon, and lettuce and tomato, and you’ve got yourself a standard club—but is it a club you really want to belong to? The Math: You’ve saved so many calories (almost 410) making my version of a club sandwich that you can enjoy those perfectly portioned Lorna Doone cookies after your meal... guilt-free! AGAIN BE HUNGRY I’LL NEVER INSTANT Boo Grace, Katonah, NY BEST SELLER S L IM S AT IS F IE D About Boo! Boo Grace is the author of AN D S E X Y 56 AT AT the successful new book: Slim Satisfied and Sexy, an Instant Best Seller! AT 56 B OO G RAC E Available now at Borders in Mt. Kisco & on-line at Amazon.com PSTEIN ATHAN E DR. JON A C E B O O G R D FOREWOR B Y F. C E C I L & Available Now at: Amazon.com & Borders of Mt. Kisco W W W. S L I M S AT I S F I E D A N D S E X Y .COM
  • 66. BOO’S DIET TIPS Pared-Down PB&J There’s a reason why PB&J is one of America’s top comfort foods for both kids and adults—combine peanut butter’s creamy, fresh-roasted taste with the com- plementary sweetness of a delectable pre- serve, and you’ve got the ultimate in sand- wich satisfaction. I love PB&J as much as the next gal and need my weekly fix, but I don’t want all the sugar, fat, and calories that are packed into regular peanut butters and jams. Instead, spread calorie-free substitutes onto light bread (about one-third the calories of regular bread and providing up to 20 percent of your RDA of fiber in just one sandwich), and you’ve got your all-American sandwich without the guilt. 2 Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches 4 slices Wonder Light Bread 160 cal 4 tbs. Walden Farms 0 cal Creamy Peanut Butter Spread Walden Farms jam 0 cal Total Only 160 calories Old style: Four slices of regular bread can run you 240 calories, and that’s before you even slather your slices with regular peanut butter (380 calories and 32g fat for 4 tbsp.) and sugar-laden jelly (up to 12g of sugar and 50 calories per tbsp.). The Math: Instead of blowing 820 calories just on lunch, save a whopping 660 calories by using our recipe for PB&J instead. AGAIN BE HUNGRY I’LL NEVER INSTANT Boo Grace, Katonah, NY BEST SELLER S L IM S AT IS F IE D About Boo! Boo Grace is the author of AN D S E X Y 56 AT AT the successful new book: Slim Satisfied and Sexy, an Instant Best Seller! AT 56 B OO G RAC E Available now at Borders in Mt. Kisco & on-line at Amazon.com PSTEIN ATHAN E DR. JON A C E B O O G R D FOREWOR B Y F. C E C I L & Available Now at: Amazon.com & Borders of Mt. Kisco W W W. S L I M S AT I S F I E D A N D S E X Y .COM
  • 67. BOO’S DIET TIPS Belly Buster Burger Whenever summertime arrives and people start firing up their grills, I get a craving for a good old-fashioned cheeseburger hot off the coals. I like to use BOCA burg- ers, which offer a variety of flavors (e.g., flame-grilled, cheeseburger, original American) that mimic the real deal, but with 65 percent less fat and substantially less cholesterol than a regular ground-beef burger. Top off your patties with calcium- and protein-rich, fat-free American cheese; fat-free Thousand Island dressing for extra flavor; and pickles, onions, and lettuce for that fresh crunch that completes every burger. It’s a scrump- tious way to re-create a fast-food favorite, complete with all the toppings and minus those unnecessary calories (and the guilt that goes along with them). Double Cheeseburger 1-1/2 light hamburger buns, toasted 120 cal 2 BOCA Burgers 70 cal each 1 slice Smart Beat fat-free American cheese 25 cal Walden Farms fat-free Thousand Island dressing 1/2 cup shredded lettuce 2–3 pickle slices 1 tsp. finely diced onion Total Only 340 calories Old style: A regular backyard-barbecue burger bonanza can cost you nearly 1,000 calories in one sitting (650 calo- ries for two ground-beef patties, 120 calories for 1-1/2 regular hamburger rolls, 95 calories for a slice of American cheese, 70 calories for 2 tbsp. of regular Thousand Island dressing, and 30 or so calories for the pickle/onion/lettuce accoutrements). The Math: Save about 625 calories with my version (and room for watermelon for dessert!). AGAIN BE HUNGRY I’LL NEVER INSTANT Boo Grace, Katonah, NY BEST SELLER S L IM S AT IS F IE D About Boo! Boo Grace is the author of AN D S E X Y 56 AT AT the successful new book: Slim Satisfied and Sexy, an Instant Best Seller! AT 56 B OO G RAC E Available now at Borders in Mt. Kisco & on-line at Amazon.com PSTEIN ATHAN E DR. JON A C E B O O G R D FOREWOR B Y F. C E C I L & Available Now at: Amazon.com & Borders of Mt. Kisco W W W. S L I M S AT I S F I E D A N D S E X Y .COM
  • 68. BOO’S DIET TIPS A Non-Rubenesque Reuben Who can resist the grilled goodness of a home- made Reuben sandwich? Not me—but I can do without the fat and calories that comes with it. Cut down on the fat content by using heart-healthy, all-natural Carl Buddig corned beef layered on light rye bread (half the calories of regular rye) with two slices of fat-free Swiss cheese. I like to top my sandwich off with warm sauerkraut for a healthy serving of extra Vitamin C and that distinctive, mouthwatering Reuben taste. You won’t even miss the calorie-rich dressing that usually smothers a Reuben—but if you crave that pickle-flecked kick like I do, you can sub- stitute a calorie-free variety like Walden Farms Thousand Island dressing. Reuben Sandwich 2 slices light rye bread 80 cal 2 slices fat-free Swiss cheese 60 cal 3 oz. Carl Buddig corned beef 120 cal Sauerkraut (14-oz. can) Total Only 260 calories Old style: Two slices of regular rye (160 calories), 2 slices of Swiss cheese (160 calories), and 3 ounces of regular corned beef (250 calories), topped off with the same can of sauerkraut, hovers dangerously close to the 600-calorie mark. The Math: Make my version of the Reuben and save yourself 340 calories in the process with sacrificing flavor and satisfaction! AGAIN BE HUNGRY I’LL NEVER INSTANT Boo Grace, Katonah, NY BEST SELLER S L IM S AT IS F IE D About Boo! Boo Grace is the author of AN D S E X Y 56 AT AT the successful new book: Slim Satisfied and Sexy, an Instant Best Seller! AT 56 B OO G RAC E Available now at Borders in Mt. Kisco & on-line at Amazon.com PSTEIN ATHAN E DR. JON A C E B O O G R D FOREWOR B Y F. C E C I L & Available Now at: Amazon.com & Borders of Mt. Kisco W W W. S L I M S AT I S F I E D A N D S E X Y .COM
  • 69. (Obama always has that look on his face —does AP own that expression?; AP is not suffering any financial loss due to  Fahey ’s image). What do you think? Was it fair usage on Fairey’s end? Should he have filed suit against AP to protect  himself, or was that just going overboard? Tell us your thoughts.     Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 13 Comments »  Back to Basics — No Computers Allowed  Monday, January 12th, 2009     Post or View  The digital revolution (it seems so antiquated to even call it that anymore) opened the  Comments (3) doors for many to enter the photographic arena, but it also jump­started a quiet yet    cranky undercurrent that chastised those who used Photoshop and other technological  E­mail this Post to a  thingamajigs as a crutch instead of as subtle enhancement.   Friend    Professionals certainly had a valid gripe: After all, now even posers could manipulate,  twist, and finagle photos with user ­friendly hardware and software in attempts to create art, whether or not they  had the vision or talent necessary to pull it off. Sometimes, the technology paved the way for hidden genius to erupt,  but more often than not, it simply let loose a gaggle of layer ­crazy wanna ­bes who used every toolbar, gadget, and  gizmo to create a chaotic hodgepodge that would be unrecognizable in its raw format.    That may be why the exhibit mentioned in the New York Times’ New Year ’s Day edition is so refreshing. Entitled  “First  Doubt: Optical Confusion in Modern Photography,” the showcase at Yale highlights more than 100  “confounding ”  photos from the mid­19th century to the 21st century. They ’re puzzling, strange, eye ­catching—and totally  unmanipulated. That’s right: According to the article, there was no digital trickery involved in any of the images. All  the photos were exactly as the professionals saw them through the lens.     It’s an experiment in surreal comprehension—and a shout ­out to old­school photography done the way it should be.      Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 3 Comments »  Auld Lang Syne, 2008  Monday, December 8th, 2008     Post or View  Here we find ourselves once more, at the end of another megapixel­filled year, hoping  Comments (2) that Santa (or whatever gift­bearing mascot or family member you choose to affiliate    with) will stuff our stockings with digital frames, rechargeable batteries—maybe even  E­mail this Post to a  the new  Nikon D3X (I’m not holding my breath on that one, though maybe my  Friend  husband actually does read my blogs like he says he does).     It’s been a challenging year, and rough times may still be ahead for many: We ’ve officially been notified that we are  indeed mired in a recession,  and many around us have lost their jobs, tapped into their dwindling 401Ks, and been  forced to cut back all around. In the spirit of the season and in an attempt to spread a little humor and good cheer  during these difficult times, I leave you with my top 5 photo­related stories of 2008, stories that caught my attention  either because of their inspirational nature or because of their inherent inanity or bizarreness.    5. Jill Greenberg, meet John McCain: The avant ­garde New York City photographer made an international name for  herself by manipulating photos of the Republican presidential candidate originally shot for “The Atlantic” magazine,  with the intention to cast him in as unflattering a light as possible (and considering he most closely resembled the  craggy­faced Emperor from “Star Wars,” it appears Greenberg fulfilled her mission). Whether you sided with  Greenberg on the platform of free speech or rebuked her for unethical behavior unbefitting a professional  photographer, everyone can agree that it resulted in some of the more passionate posts in the blogging community  we ’ve seen in a while —and passion in the photography industry is just what we need right now.      4. As homo sapiens, we tend to carry a bit of species ­specific narcissism. But National Geographic’s Best Animal  Wildlife Photos of 2008 reminded us of how dangerous and beautiful our creature companions can be —and that we  share this planet with them.     3. You can mash them, dice them, bake them, even cut them into crinkles and fry them—but 2008 was declared the  International Year of the Potato by the United Nations, so it naturally followed that there be a photo contest to  document this titillating tuber.     2. Who can forget that iconic 1945 WWII photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt of a nurse being swept off her feet in Times  Square by a sailor right after the surrender of Japan? Well, the Navy didn ’t forget, honoring the young woman in the  photo (the now ­90­year­old Edith Shain) this past Veterans Day.     1.After the public outcry that took Annie Liebovitz to task for provocatively draping a nearly nude Miley Cyrus in  nothing but a blanket for her Vanity Fair shoot, the teen phenom recently came out and said that she ’d “love” to  work with the  “amazing ” photographer again. No hard feelings, I guess —and who am I to argue with Hannah  Montana?     Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 2 Comments »  A LIFE­time of images  Monday, November 17th, 2008   Haven ’t gotten around to scanning and digitally archiving some of your old photos,  Leave A Comment even though you know it ’s the right thing to do (or, at least that ’s what certain  magazine editors and other industry pundits keep telling you)? Well, stop making    excuses —after all, if LIFE magazine can manage to scan and upload 10 million of their  E­mail this Post to a  most personal images, surely you can clean out that snapshot ­laden shoebox sitting in  Friend  your hall closet.    In what is being touted as one of the largest professional photography collections on the Web, LIFE is making  available its photo archive through a new  hosted image service from search­engine behemoth Google. Even more  amazing than the sheer bulk of the project itself is that 97 percent of the images have never been seen by the public.  
  • 70. magazine editors and other industry pundits keep telling you)? Well, stop making    excuses —after all, if LIFE magazine can manage to scan and upload 10 million of their  E­mail this Post to a  most personal images, surely you can clean out that snapshot ­laden shoebox sitting in  Friend  your hall closet.    In what is being touted as one of the largest professional photography collections on the Web, LIFE is making  available its photo archive through a new  hosted image service from search­engine behemoth Google. Even more  amazing than the sheer bulk of the project itself is that 97 percent of the images have never been seen by the public.     Viewers can check out handsomely mustached  Civil War hotties on display in the 1860s section; browse through  iconic photographs of Pablo Picasso, Franklin Roosevelt, and Marilyn Monroe; and travel back in time to see photo  documentation of the  1930s oil boom, Vietnam War, or the World’s Fair. And web surfers trolling for photos can  hail from all walks of life from all over the planet: the search keywords have been translated into 16 different  languages.     Plus, if you’re in the market for some high­end artwork (if only to impress your high ­falutin’ friends), you’ll also be able  to purchase fine­art photographic prints through Qoop.com, an online sales portal.     LIFE also announces the most comprehensive offering to date to purchase fine art photographic prints online. The  general public will now have access to buy LIFE ’s famous photography through QOOP.com, a leader in online art  sales.     The project is far from complete—at last count, LIFE had only posted a few million of its archived photos (the staff  hope to have all 10 million up in the next few months). But it ’s yet another masterful melding of art and technology,  joining two powerhouses in their respective industries. Photos are meant to be shared, and what better way to  share them globally than by tapping into the Google machine?    Now get to work on that shoebox of yours.     Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | No Comments »  Dial­a­Photo  Wednesday, October 15th, 2008   So by now you’re probably a master at texting on your fancy cell­phone QWERTY  Leave A Comment keyboard, and a pro at downloading ringtones. You ’ve also surely taken more than a  few pictures with that handy in ­phone camera of your kids, your friends, your dog. And    while your “Albums” file probably doesn ’t have a lot of pictures that rival those you’ve  E­mail this Post to a  taken with your real digicam, perhaps there are a couple that show some artistic  Friend  promise, a strange technological aesthetic that can only be achievable in the heat of  the moment (when you don ’t have your real camera with you and have to rely on the  ol’ horn).     Well, now all those who have clicked and captured on the go can get their change to show off their skills to the world  with a unique new exhibit being held by the Brandt Gallery in Cleveland, OH. The  “At The Cellular Level — Cell  Phone Photography as Art” showcase, scheduled to open next month, will be comprised of cell ­phone photography  from both everyday amateurs and (supposedly) professionals. Interested parties simply have to download images  from their phone and send them to cellphonephotoshow @ yahoo.com, or e­mail them directly from their phone.    I anticipate most of the submissions will be from the amateur side, closet imagers who will test their creativity  without having to outlay any money for new equipment. I’d like to think most people who own cell phones already  have one with a built­in camera, though I sheepishly admit that I just updated my own dial­up dinosaur at the Sprint  store over the summer (I was basically laughed out of the store when they saw how old my phone was).    I don’t think many professionals, on the other hand, will be entirely pleased with the quality of their captures, at least  compared to what they ’re used to getting on a daily basis in the studio or on location. However, there may be some  pros who view this as yet another unique visual medium with its own requisite challenges; others may be drawn to  the raw, on ­the­fly nature that cell­phone photography necessitates.     it should be interesting, at any rate, to witness what comes out of this exhibit. I can’t ever see a pro trading in his or  her Canon or Nikon for a Samsung or Nokia, but we could have a new creative outlet on our hands in its own right.    Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | No Comments »  Back­to­School Memories  Thursday, September 4th, 2008     Post or View  Pumpkin and apple spice, vibrant pressed leaves, the crisp air of a late ­September  Comments (1) evening (at least here in the Northeast), the jack­’o­lanterns and cornucopias    dominating the seasonal aisle at Target — these are all harbingers of autumn, signs  E­mail this Post to a  that it’s time to kiss the summer goodbye and start planning for the cooler months  Friend  ahead.   It’s also time for back ­to­school photos and (shudder) time to enter the planning stages for holiday pictures and  greeting cards. My two children were born in August and September, so I ’ve got to set up birthday portraits as well,  or I’ll never hear the end of it from my mother.      For the past three years, I’ve been too tired/lazy/unmotivated/frazzled/cheap/add­your­own ­”bad ­mother”­adjective ­ here to hunker down and do the research to select a professional photographer who could adequately capture the  essence that defines each of my kids. Instead, I ’ve done what many others have done in similar moments of  desperation: I ’ve gone to the in ­house studio of a well ­known national baby retailer.     Now, this isn’t to say said retailer has done a bad job. I have some really cute images of my son sitting in front of a  faux lighthouse, my daughter draped in pearls. And, amazingly enough, they ’re smiling (and sitting!) in all the photos.  Plus, the prices have been fairly reasonable. 
  • 71. For the past three years, I’ve been too tired/lazy/unmotivated/frazzled/cheap/add­your­own ­”bad ­mother”­adjective ­ here to hunker down and do the research to select a professional photographer who could adequately capture the  essence that defines each of my kids. Instead, I ’ve done what many others have done in similar moments of  desperation: I ’ve gone to the in ­house studio of a well ­known national baby retailer.     Now, this isn’t to say said retailer has done a bad job. I have some really cute images of my son sitting in front of a  faux lighthouse, my daughter draped in pearls. And, amazingly enough, they ’re smiling (and sitting!) in all the photos.  Plus, the prices have been fairly reasonable.    But as the years have ticked by, a nagging feeling has started to set in. I ’ve noticed that the lighting in these shots  leaves much to be desired, with harsh shadows evident throughout. I ’ve also started to feel cramped by the images  I’m able to order: While the photo session itself is free, you ’re only allowed to pick a few poses to create prints from,  and the limited packages makes it nearly impossible for me to put together a customized a la carte package I’ve been  happy with.   And while the smiles are precious, every pose and picture angle is pretty much exactly the same in all the images.  There’s not much originality and, frankly, not much personality. Plus, the interaction between the store  photographers and my kids is lacking — while the staff certainly tries hard, they ’ve usually been young employees  with little to no photography experience trying to rush through the shoot to accommodate the growing line of cranky  people at the studio. They ’re usually forced to resort to chasing my son and daughter around the studio with a  feather duster to try to eke out one half ­smile. If that one trick doesn ’t bring the desired results, they usually look to  ME to evoke the perfect expression (and after a full day of spilled goldfish, bedroom brawls, and preschool attitude,  I’m usually feeling less than inspired).    In other words, all this time I’ve settled for a hodgepodge of mediocre imagery. So I ’ve started to do the research to  track down a pro in my area. I know I ’ll have to pony up a little more dough this time around (hmmm …gas in the tank,  or an extra few sets of 5×7s for the grandparents?), but from interviewing many child and family portrait  photographers, I know that in return I ’ll likely get a more­relaxed session that won ’t feel rushed; lighting that  adequately illuminates my little angels; creative closeups and precious poses; and a pro who ’s been around the  kiddie block and knows how to appeal to and calm my kids down (as well as how to calm ME down).   That way, when my two tax deductions head off to college in a decade and a half, and I’m wallowing in my empty  nest, trolling through the family albums and scrapbooks, I’ll be able to relive these fleeting days through every  mischievous expression and missing­tooth grin that only a professional could truly capture. And I ’ll know it was worth  it. Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 1 Comment »  Uploading Angst  Thursday, July 31st, 2008     Post or View  While I now love the convenience that consumer photo­sharing and printing sites such  Comments (2) as Snapfish and Shutterfly offer, I admit that I haven ’t always been in love with the    online process.  E­mail this Post to a    Friend  I consider myself pretty technologically savvy for a thirtysomething mom: I navigate my  iPod with ease, I text ­message my husband and friends, and I can even figure out how  to fix my MacBook laptop when things go awry (forget about PCs, though — they’re a whole different animal). Yet  when I first joined the online photo portal world four years ago when my son was born (I ’m a Snapfish member), I  was annoyed by some of the glitches that I soon encountered during my uploading endeavors.    For a supposed time ­saver, using this type of online service didn ’t seem that convenient when I had to check each  individual photo in my image library, a process that wasted many a summer afternoon when I should have been  playing with my infant. Plus, more often that not, I would finally finish uploading all the images, only to find that half  of them hadn’t uploaded correctly, or at all.     Now I know that I’m not the only one who has felt this type of photographic frustration. A new study by digital media  management company Memeo shows that other consumers are also working around the kinks and conundrums that  still plague some of these online solutions. The study found that some of the respondents’ biggest gripes were the  time it takes to upload photos (36%) and that family members who want to access these photos can’t figure out how  to use the sites (19%). (I can certainly relate to that last point  — I don’t even want to reveal how many hours I ’ve  spent in an e ­mail trail with my 80­year­old grandmother trying to explain to her how to see her great ­grandkids on  her computer screen as she tries to mouse around the Snapfish or Flickr screen.)   To be fair, things are much better these days than they were during the last Summer Olympics  — I’m happy to report  that I can now select multiple photos at once to upload, go stir the Classico, and come back a little later to view all  my albums online. The service I use (still Snapfish) now offers a ton of gifts, photo books, and other photo  accoutrements that keep me shopping for hours (I especially love the collage­poster option  — I’ve started a tradition  of creating a 20 x 30 version every holiday season to showcase my family’s favorite photos from the entire year,  which I display next to the previous year ’s version in our hallway).    Most telling (and most disturbing to those of us in the industry) from this Memeo survey, however, is that a whopping  79% of respondents revealed they have taken digital pictures they ’ve intended to share, but never did. The photo  industry still has a lot of work to do in terms of educating consumers and eliminating the intimidation factor. Only then  will photo sharing reach its full potential online. Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 2 Comments »  Free Trade?  Monday, June 23rd, 2008     Post or View  Photographers of all levels will soon be able to check out Photrade.com, a free new  Comments (1) site (now in the private beta stage) where users can  “share, protect, and make    money.” Not only can you display your images, you can also sell stock, prints, and  E­mail this Post to a  merchandise through the site ’s Adcosystem, an ad ­supported system that pays photo  Friend  owners for every image view (unlike storage sites like Flickr, which allow you to 
  • 72. Monday, June 23rd, 2008     Post or View  Photographers of all levels will soon be able to check out Photrade.com, a free new  Comments (1) site (now in the private beta stage) where users can  “share, protect, and make    money.” Not only can you display your images, you can also sell stock, prints, and  E­mail this Post to a  merchandise through the site ’s Adcosystem, an ad ­supported system that pays photo  Friend  owners for every image view (unlike storage sites like Flickr, which allow you to  maintain your galleries in cyberspace, but don ’t pay you a penny for it).    Both amateur photographers and pros are invited to sell their images in a fully protected environment (all images are  watermarked to prevent misuse or theft). If selling is your goal, photographers can pick a suggested minimum price, a  suggested marked ­up price, or a custom price. You can also earn money through an ad ­revenue setup (either  through banner ads in your gallery or in the images themselves, and from splash ­screen ads). This ad ­revenue  service is similar to the newly launched Dimpls site, which allows users to place logos and ads next to relevant  pictures to get click­through cash.   These two services (especially Dimpls) are obviously more geared to amateurs who don’t want to give away the  photo farm for free (though isn’t sharing the real goal of posting your images online? I don’t even consider how much  money I could be making off of the kids’ snapshots that I upload for Grandma and Grandpa to view in Florida). And  how much money can I really make anyway?   I am curious to see if (and how many) pros would actually use Photrade.com (the site keeps emphasizing that it’s for  professionals, too, though I ’m hard­pressed to see why any pro would want to  “compete” with your average Joe in  selling his or her images here). Consumers and strapped ­for­cash companies will likely be checking out sites such as  these (and there will be more), instead of having to pony up their pennies for more expensive online stock houses. Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 1 Comment »  Dude, Where’s My Camera?  Wednesday, May 21st, 2008     Post or View  You can never have too many megapixels  — or can you?   Comments (1)     Ask the consumers who may soon get to test­drive the Gigapan, the world ’s first 1­ E­mail this Post to a  billion­pixel camera.  Friend    Yes, you heard correctly  — 1 billion pixels.     Call it the Iron Man of imaging. A tripod­mounted robot commands the uber ­camera to capture several hundred  photographs of a single scene, all from a slightly different angle. This creates, in effect, a panoramic 3D experience  that’s unmatched by any other camera on the market. An image taken with the Gigapan retains phenomenal  sharpness even as you zoom in and out of different parts of the image (think Google Earth).    Not that the beta product is without its detractors — early grumblers are commenting on everything from the time  involved (it could take 10 to 15 minutes to capture 350 mini ­images needed to pull together the composite final) to  how the camera deals with moving objects to the fact that less­glamorous prototypes with motorized mounts have  been used for years (and probably for a lot less money than the Gigapan ’s likely price tag — though the word is that  the camera will be less than what existing current high ­res panoramic cameras go for).    Who came up with this piece of technical wonderment? It may sound like something straight out of a Marvel comic  book, but it’s NASA, Google, and National Geographic who receive the kudos in this case.     Now if they could only get  Robert Downey Jr. to endorse it, they ’d have an unstoppable sell. No official word yet on  the Gigapan ’s price or release.      Speaking of celebrity endorsements, I’ve caught a few of Nikon ’s new  TV spots starring easy­on­the­eyes actor  Ashton Kutcher. Nikon’s products have always been hot in my book, but the heat just got turned up with the  appearance of Mr. Demi Moore in the ad campaign hawking the stylish, fashionable COOLPIX compact digicam line.    Let’s just hope viewers don ’t think they’re being Punk ’d. If they can take their eyes off Ashton’s sexy stubble for  1/250th of a second, they’ll see that the underlying message is not just about the trendy COOLPIX colors — it also  emphasizes the cameras ’ performance, simplicity, and quality.     In other words, there is substance beneath the veneer — something that’s sometimes lacking in a world where  anyone can buy Photoshop and go to town on a photo.     Posted in  Jennifer Gidman | 1 Comment »  « Previous Entries Eye Openers is powered by  WordPress All content  © www.imaginginfo.com This blog is protected by  dr Dave's Spam Karma 2: 18870  Spams eaten and counting...  Podcast Powered by podPress (v8.8)