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Printmaking
 

Printmaking

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Authored by fellow teacher Tricia Barry for use in a collaborative Art I printmaking assignment.

Authored by fellow teacher Tricia Barry for use in a collaborative Art I printmaking assignment.

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  • Hi - Can you let me know what this presentation was used for? I like to let the artists know how their work is being shared. Thanks!

    Jennifer Schmitt
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  • On display at a Philadelphia gallery (Chemical Heritage Foundation) in May, 2011
  • Tin is a silvery-white metal, the chemical element of atomic number 50. (Symbol: Sn). I pictured The Steadfast Tin Soldier from the classic fairy tale by Anderson.

Printmaking Printmaking Presentation Transcript

  • Printmaking Printmaking• The art of stamping• Purpose = making multiples of the same image
  • Printmaking1. Purpose 1. Make multiple copies of an original
  • Types of Printing Processes: Silkscreen Lithography Intaglio/Etching Monotype Relief
  • Printmaking1. Purpose 1. Make multiple copies of an original4. Types 2. Silkscreen Lithography Intaglio/ etching Monotype Relief
  • SilkscreenImages made by forcing ink through silk stretched on a wooden frame• Stencil or block-out image using fluid• Apply ink to areas were no fluid was used• Squeegee ink through screen onto fabric/paper/clothing
  • Printmaking2. Types 2. Silkscreen Lithography Intaglio/ etching Monotype Relief3. Silkscreen 3. Images made by forcing ink through silk stretched on a wooden frame
  • Lithography Images made by printing on the surface of the stone or surface• A greasy (oil-based) crayon is applied to a smooth block of limestone. – The stone is ground down, acid is applied to clean it, water is sponged onto the stone and oil-based ink is rolled on.• Ink will only stick to the crayon but not the water.• Paper is placed on top and a large press applies pressure to transfer the ink.
  • Printmaking3. Silkscreen 3. Images made by forcing ink through silk stretched on a wooden frame4. Lithography 4. Images made by printing on the surface of the stone or surface
  • Intaglio Images made by printing from the lower surface• Lines are cut or etched into a smooth plate of metal• Ink is rubbed into the grooves and the surface is wiped clean• Damp paper is forced into the inked grooves by heavy printing press
  • Printmaking4. Lithography 4. Images made by printing on the surface of the stone or surface5. Intaglio/Etching 5. Images made by printing from the lower surface
  • Monotype Printing Image made by painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface one time• An image is painted• The paper is pressed onto the image, transferring it.• The unique aspect of a monotype is that the plate can never be replicated.
  • Printmaking5. Intaglio/Etching 5. Images made by printing from the lower surface6. Monotype 6. Image made by painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface one time
  • Relief Printing Images made by printing from a raised surface• The lowered area does not print – stays the color of the paper. One color ink• Examples – woodcuts, linoleum cuts, found objects, fingerprints
  • Printmaking6. Monotype 6. Image made by painting on a smooth, non-absorbent surface one time7. Relief 7. Images made by printing from a raised surface
  • Reduction Printing• Relief printing using more than one color – Every time a color is printed, that particular color will be carved away, reducing the block down and eliminating that color in order to print a different color
  • Printmaking7. Relief 7. Images made by printing from a raised surface8. Reduction 8. Relief printing using Printing more than one color9. Tools
  • Video• https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KETwb4M• http://videos.howstuffworks.com/howstuffwork
  • Tools for Block Printing Brayer Carving tool Barren Ink Ink plate/bench hook Block
  • Block the surface that has an image to beprinted- wood, linoleum or vinyl
  • Linoleum & Carving Tool
  • Ink Plate/Bench hook• Used for holding your linoleum in place to carve & for rolling out ink
  • Brayer a roller for transferring ink tothe ink plate for printing
  • Barron 4 ½ inch circular tool used forpressing paper onto a plate or blockfor hand printing.
  • Ink
  • Who thought of this??• An artist named Jennifer Schmitt from Massachusetts• One day she laid out all her prints on the floor on afternoon and though “Gee, they look like the periodic table."• A friend dared her to do the project• She posted her idea on Etsy and BarenForum.org (a group for printmakers, primarily woodcut artists), and it spread from there...• IT MAY NOT BE TOO MUCH OF A COINCIDENCE: The artists mother was a high school chemistry teacher
  • Jennifer Schmitt with the Periodic Table ofPrintmaking, on display in Elemental Matters
  • Jennifer Schmitt“This visual interpretation makes it easier to remember information about the elements, gives you a story or a tidbit or fact to hang onto. I know far more about a lot elements now than I did a year ago or in 10th grade.”
  • The Periodic table of Elements - promoting both science and art• 97 printmakers produced 118 prints in a combo of; woodcut, linocut, monotype, etching, lithograph, silkscreen.• 7 countries - Australia, Canada, England, Italy, Japan, Scotland, United States• 29 US states & Puerto Rico from the US - Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.
  • Element Artist Location1 Hydrogen H Nathan Cannon Ohio2 Helium He Jennifer Schmitt Massachusetts3 Lithium Li Marissa Swinghammer Massachusetts4 Beryllium Be Krista Stout Minnesota5 Boron B Miles Histand Oregon6 Carbon C Kris Shanks California7 Nitrogen N Diane Cutter Puerto Rico8 Oxygen O Mari-Claire Vaccaro Connecticut9 Fluorine F Caren Loebel-Fried New Jersey/Hawaii10 Neon Ne Stacy Rodriguez New York11 Sodium Na Connie Pierson Washington12 Magnesium Mg Sandra Tatsuko Kadowaki Canada13 Aluminum Al Ellen Brooks North Dakota14 Silicon Si Tiberiu Chelcea Pennsylvania15 Phosphorus P Michelle Arnold Texas16 Sulfur S Tara Shedlosky New York17 Chlorine Cl Annie Bissett Massachusetts18 Argon Ar Sandra Tatsuko Kadowaki Canada19 Potassium K Perla Pequeño New York20 Calcium Ca Marian Short Michigan21 Scandium Sc Camilla Stacy United Kingdom22 Titanium Ti Ellen Shipley California23 Vanadium V John H. May South Carolina24 Chromium Cr Kate Nydam Connecticut25 Manganese Mn Marissa Buschow Texas26 Iron Fe Amy Arledge Connecticut27 Cobalt Co Aine Scannell Scotland28 Nickel Ni Christa Demetriou United Kingdom29 Copper Cu Kate Hutchison New Jersey
  • A little background..• Dmitri Mendeleev published the first periodic table in 1869. He showed that when the elements were ordered according to atomic weight, a pattern resulted where similar properties for elements recurred periodically. Based on the work of physicist Henry Moseley, the periodic table was reorganized on the basis of increasing atomic number rather than on atomic weight.
  • Artist: Natalia Moroz• Darmstadtium is the synthetic chemical element, a superheavy metal, of atomic number 110. The first atom of the heaviest chemical element was detected in Darmstadt, Germany in 1994. It decays after a small fraction of a thousandth of a second into lighter elements by emitting alpha-particles which are the nuclei of helium atoms. Reading about Darmstadtium I instantly imagined its superheavy atom lifted by an old-fashioned circus weightlifter. He is struggling under the weight while looking expectantly at his wristwatch: the weight is supposed to lighten any millisecond now.