Inquiry-based Learning
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  • Based on John Dewey's philosophy that education begins with the curiosity of the learner Works well with many educational techniques including multiple-intelligence, cooperative learning, and constructivism Can be implemented during any activity and with any subject or grade level Focuses on information-processing and problem-solving skills More emphasis on "how we come to know" and less on "what we know." Students learn how to continue learning.

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  • 1. Inquiry-Based Learning Janetta Garton Technology Curriculum Director Willard R-II School http://www.willard.k12.mo.us/co/tech/inquiry.htm Based on John Dewey's philosophy that education begins with the curiosity of the learner Works well with many educational techniques including multiple-intelligence, cooperative learning, and constructivism Can be implemented during any activity and with any subject or grade level Focuses on information-processing and problem-solving skills More emphasis on "how we come to know" and less on "what we know." Students learn how to continue learning.
  • 2. Inquiry-Based Learning has 5 common components Questions Student Engagement Cooperative Interaction Performance Evaluation Variety of Resources
  • 3.
    • Lesson begins with a question
    • Essential question
    • The teacher asks an essential question
    • Stimulates investigation and sparks curiosity
    • Can be asked over and over, no one right answer
    • Answer must be invented or constructed
    • From the top of Bloom's Taxonomy
        • Requires students to EVALUATE (make a thoughtful choice between options, with the choice based upon clearly stated criteria)
        • Requires students to SYNTHESIZE (invent a new or different version)
        • Requires students to ANALYZE (develop a thorough and complex understanding through skillful questioning)
    • General in nature and lead to more questions
    • Example Essential Questions
    • Must a story have a moral?
    • Were mathematical theorems invented or discovered?
    • Subsidiary/Unit Questions
    • Developed by students and teacher to find an answer to the essential question
    • Topic orientated
    • Specific
    • Example
    • Essential Question: Do we have to fight wars?
    • Unit Question: What events lead to the Civil War?
    Questions
  • 4.
    • Teacher is facilitator
    • Students
      • carry out activities using materials, observing, evaluating, and recording information
      • sort out information and decide what is important
      • see detail
      • detect sequences and events
      • notice change
      • detect differences and similarities
      • are creating a unique product that shows their understanding
    Student Engagement
  • 5.
    • Students are asked to
      • work in pairs or groups
      • discussing ideas
    • Not a competition.
    • Answers come in all shapes and forms.
    Cooperative Interaction
  • 6.
    • Students create an end product to communicate their knowledge,
      • slideshow
      • graph
      • poster
      • song
      • mural
    • Scoring Guides
      • students see SG prior to creating product
    Performance Evaluation
  • 7. textbooks reference books magazines web sites videos podcasts posters experts Variety of Resources
  • 8. Traditional Lesson Students will be taught the 3 types of rocks (sedimentary, igneous, metamorphic) using a textbook. Students will then create a flipbook of the three types of rocks that includes definitions and examples. The Inquiry-Based Learning Version Essential Question : What patterns exist under the earth's crust? Student Engagement : Students observe rock samples detecting differences and similarities, sorting and recording information Cooperative Learning : Students will work in research groups Performance Evaluation : Students will publish a multimedia slide to be shared with their classmates, scored with a scoring guide Variety of Resources : textbook, Internet, CD-ROMS, and rock samples. Example
  • 9. Graphics courtesy of lumaxart via Flickr www.flickr.com/photos/lumaxart/ thegoldguys.blogspot.com www.lumaxart.com