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Status of GeoTools
 

Status of GeoTools

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We are pleased to introduce GeoTools 8. This presentation covers the latest and greatest developments in this OSGeo project. ...

We are pleased to introduce GeoTools 8. This presentation covers the latest and greatest developments in this OSGeo project.

GeoTools serves as a foundation for many of the exciting projects you will see here at FOSS4G. From 52N, Geomajas through to the early adopters such as GeoServer and uDig. An understanding of this core OSGeo project is an important piece in being productive in the open source Java GIS community.

With the component is such wide spread use it is important to understand how GeoTools has shifted its directions and goals as a Java library. This background information allow you to make the most of the GeoTools library at a business level. GeoTools offers a range of options for involvement allowing you to take part (even in an less formal capacity), set the direction, and participate in the release process.

Central to this presentation is an update on the new capabilities available in today's GeoTools. Key improvements, extensive new documentation, rendering capabilities and a range of extensions will be covered.

The presentation will include a quick tour of the base classes used to make integration easy and pain free, as show as they are used in the library. We also offer a sneak peek at developments in our unsupported sandbox including side by side comparisons of the gt-swing and gt-swt extensions.

If you are new to GeoTools development this is a great way to see what is available, and if you already know the project attend to keep up to date with the substantial improvements and additional capabilities available in today's GeoTools.

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  • Welcome to GeoTools!\n
  • I am afraid Andrea could not join us today; he has managed to break his ankle (and left me up here all alone).\n
  • I am afraid Andrea could not join us today; he has managed to break his ankle (and left me up here all alone).\n
  • GeoTools *is* the Java GIS Toolkit :-)\n\nWell at least it is happy to trace its roots back to the dawn of the JVM.\n\nGeoTools 1.0  was started at Leeds University by James Macgill and Ian Turton in 1996.\n\nThe codebase was reset in 2003 with an influx of code from the SEAGIS project and a project management committee setup.\n\nWe have had a steady series of releases since then:\n\nThe Geotools 1.0 Lite Project (1996 - 2003)\nGeotools 2.0 Project (2002 to Geotools 2.1 (2004 to 2005)\n2004)\nGeotools 2.2 (2005)\nGeoTools 2.3 (2005-2007)\nGeoTools 2.4 (2006-2007)\nGeoTools 2.5 (2007)\nGeoTools 2.6 (2008)\nGeoTools 2.7 (2009 - Present) GeoTools 8 (unreleased) \n
  • GeoTools today is well represented with ten organisations actively participating.\n\nMore importantly you can see a number of names marked with "?" - these individuals are new to GeoTools and are often working on RnD activities in our "unsupported" sandbox.\n
  • This graph shows a very active project with many issues being reported; and the developers doing the best to keep up.\n\nYou can really notice a few spikes as development teams try out the library from armed with a different application or dataset in mind.\n\nClick on the link to see an update of the chart provided (additional charts are available if you login to the issue tracker).\n
  • Documentation is the key feature this year!\n\nReally :-)\n
  • This really is the "GeoTools 2" project finally taking over and being the "GeoTools" project.\n\nWe have averaged one release ever year or so. Making "Version 8" a clear indication of where the project is at with respect to maturity and stability.\n
  • Documentation is the key feature this year!\n\nReally :-)\n
  • Since 2003 GeoTools has employed a “wiki” to capture user documentation.\n
  • In 2009 we set up our main website using “Sphinx”\nin 2010 Jody ported the tutorials from open office to Sphinx.\nIn 2011 Jody finished the Job.\n
  • In 2009 we set up our main website using “Sphinx”\nin 2010 Jody ported the tutorials from open office to Sphinx.\nIn 2011 Jody finished the Job.\n
  • The wiki was a great way to pass around small java code examples.\n\nDid they compile? Not really. Could you tell when they were written? Or what version of GeoTools they worked on?\n\nOnce again no.\n
  • The wiki was a great way to pass around small java code examples.\n\nDid they compile? Not really.\n\nCould you tell when they were written? Or what version of GeoTools they worked on?\n\nOnce again no.\n
  • The wiki was a great way to pass around small java code examples.\n\nDid they compile? Not really.\n\nCould you tell when they were written? Or what version of GeoTools they worked on?\n\nOnce again no.\n
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  • This is the origional diagram made for a presentation at FOSS4G 2006 (Done in Viso so nobody could really edit it)\n
  • All diagrams are now done in SVG using Inkscape (so that any developer can update them as needed).\n
  • Class diagrams were uploaded to the wiki using a range of tools. \n\nThis often allowed the class diagrams to fall behind the current state of the library - providing oppertunity for confusion.\n
  • Class diagrams are created using "ObjectAID" directly from the java classes or interfaces involved.\n\nThe diagrams are committed directly into source code and are set to automatically generate the PNG file used in the documentations if they are modified.\n\nThis allows us to give you accurate and up to date diagrams.\n
  • In the past the creation of Tutorials for GeoTools was a bit add-hoc.\n\nBasically when Jody Got a workshop accepted at FOSS4G.\n\nThese would also gradually go out of date. As the versions of Java, Maven and Eclipse used changed over time.\n
  • Tutorials now documented in "sphinx" giving us a chance to splice in live code examples that do not go out fo date.\n\nOrigional done for FOSS4G 2010 their long term stability showed the viability of using Sphinx for GeoTools.\n
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  • Extensive welcome section\n
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  • Andrea has been working hard on referencing; as you can see he really believes in this being a developer friendly presentation - with source code examples!\n\nThe key thing about “referencing” information is the rich set of data structures used to mark down what your information should be used; and the helpful way we have isolated you from the internal details (ie Math) using utility classes such as CRS, JTS and ReprojectingFeatureCollection.\n
  • A quick list of some of the traditional projects available to GeoTools developers.\n
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  • The important part here is to note the number of new entries being added to GeoTools.\n\nItems marked in grey are considered unsupported (often they are an experiment; or represent code that does not have an active maintenance contract).\n
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  • The number of layers you can work with is now “open ended” with the ability to define your own implementation of “Direct Layer”. This class hierarchy is an improvement in that each kind of layer is represented a distinct class.\n
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  • The ability to define your own symbology and “plug” it into the rendering engine is really being taken advantage of in GeoTools. Here we have a quick example of using a true type font.\n
  • The feature is often used by teams implementing MIL2525B symbology. A popular example from the GeoServer cookbook is the “Slash” shown above.\n
  • All of this is backed by a Java interface so can connect the geotools renderer to any set of symbology you have in your possession; or create a symbol dynamically on the fly by accessing feature attributes.\n
  • Another feature that is starting to gain traction is the use of functions to transform a geometry prior to display. In this example the technique is used to create arrow heads.\n\n
  • Another example used to create a drop shadow effect; by offsetting the geometry.\n
  • You can create a function quickly as shown above; you need to “Register” it in META-INF/services by adding the name of your class to the appropriate text file.\n
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  • If you would like to read more try the FAQ http://docs.geotools.org/latest/userguide/library/xml/faq.html\n
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  • http://how2map.blogspot.com/2011/04/classifiers-and-colorbrewer.html\n
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  • Check out the GeoTools docs for a tutorial coming soon!\n
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  • We mentioned this one earlier!\n
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  • Part of keeping GeoTools in fighting shape is cutting off the cruft.\n\nWe have been diligent about allowing full deprecation cycle allowing projects to transition to the JDBC "next generation" datastore based on a much cleaner design.\n
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Status of GeoTools Status of GeoTools Presentation Transcript