2013 U.S. Housing 
Market Forecast 
(800) 611-3060
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Your Premier Source for Turnkey Cash-Flow Inve...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 2 
Top 10 Real Estate Markets in the United States 
 
The question most real estate investor...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 3 
About Metropolitan Statistical Areas and This Report 
 
This report focuses primarily on ...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 4 
Change in Housing Prices in the Largest 100 Metropolitan Areas 
 
The map below displays ...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 5 
1.  McAllen–Edinburg–Mission, Texas 
     
Population:  774,769   Peak House Price:  2006...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 6 
2.  Las Vegas–Paradise, Nevada 
     
Population:  1,951,269   Peak House Price:  2006 Q4...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 7 
3.  Colorado Springs, Colorado 
     
Population:  645,613   Peak House Price:  2006 Q4
P...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 8 
4.  Phoenix–Mesa–Glendale, Arizona 
     
Population:  4,192,887   Peak House Price:  200...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 9 
5.  North Port–Bradenton–Sarasota, Florida 
     
Population:  702,281   Peak House Price...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 10 
6.  Tucson, Arizona 
     
Population:  980,263   Peak House Price:  2006 Q4
Population ...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 11 
7.  Tulsa, Oklahoma 
     
Population:  937,478   Peak House Price:  2009 Q1
Population ...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 12 
8.  Denver–Aurora–Broomfield, Colorado 
     
Population:  2,543,487   Peak House Price:...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 13 
9.  Sacramento–Arden–Arcade–Roseville, California 
     
Population:  2,149,127   Peak H...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 14 
10.  Cleveland–Elyria–Mentor, Ohio 
     
Population:  2,077,240   Peak House Price:  20...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 15 
Top 100 Metropolitan Markets 
 
Metropolitan Area (MSA) 
Peak Quarter 
House Price 
Trou...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 16 
49  Washington‐Arlington‐Alexandria, DC‐VA‐MD 2006 Q4 2012 Q2 1.4%  10.2% 18.7%
50  Dayt...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 17 
Understanding the Graphs 
 
Total Employment and Unemployment 
Total employment refers t...
www.NoradaRealEstate.com
Page 18 
About Us 
 
Norada Real Estate Investments 
Norada Real Estate Investments is a premier ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

2013 housing-market-forecast

720
-1

Published on

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
720
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

2013 housing-market-forecast

  1. 1. 2013 U.S. Housing  Market Forecast  (800) 611-3060 www.NoradaRealEstate.com Your Premier Source for Turnkey Cash-Flow Investment Property SPECIAL REPORT Appreciation Edition   Updated: 2/25/2013 
  2. 2. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 2  Top 10 Real Estate Markets in the United States    The question most real estate investors ask is, “Where do I invest now?”    As always, there are local housing markets around the country where homes are affordable, the  underlying economy is strong, and appreciation is imminent.  These are the markets you should  consider for your next long‐term real estate investment.    Norada Real Estate Investments tracks the economic conditions and real estate trends of nearly  400  markets  across  the  country.    Because  of  the  dynamic  nature  of  real  estate  market  conditions, we continually monitor and rank the top markets to make it easier for you, as an  investor, to concentrate on the areas that will give you the greatest opportunity for success.    While  you  might  be  inclined  to  look  for  bargains  in  areas  that  have  seen  the  largest  price  corrections in the past, watch out – there is no guarantee that home prices in areas of high  speculation will ever rebound to boom levels.    The  following  is  a  list  of  the  top  10  metropolitan  areas  for  real  estate  investing  based  on  forecasts for price appreciation and future job growth.  These areas are ideal for real estate  investors seeking growth markets with strong appreciation potential.    You will also find a complete list and ranking of the 100 largest metropolitan areas on page 15.    Continued success,      Marco Santarelli  President & Founder  Norada Real Estate Investments         
  3. 3. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 3  About Metropolitan Statistical Areas and This Report    This report focuses primarily on Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA), the geographic building blocks of  America’s economy and society.  Why metropolitan areas?  Unlike individual cities and towns, or large  political  units  like  states,  these  are  the  places  within  which  most  people  live  their  daily  lives.    Most  Americans (84 percent) live in metropolitan areas.  Most workers (58 percent) commute to jobs within  their  metropolitan  area,  but  in  a  city  or  town  different  from  the  one  in  which  they  live.    Most  metropolitan residents who move (79 percent) choose another location within the same metro area.   We  do  our  shopping  in  different  parts  of  metropolitan  areas,  get  our  media  from  metro‐wide  newspapers and television stations, and root for sports teams and visit cultural institutions that service  whole regions.  We share natural resources and infrastructure — air, water, roads, airports — at the  metropolitan level.  Related businesses cluster and share innovations and labor force expertise within  metro  areas.    In  short,  metropolitan  areas  represent  the  critical  geographic  lens  through  which  to  understand a changing housing market trend.    Metropolitan areas as a statistical concept join cities and their suburbs together to represent local and  regional markets.  In the United States, Metropolitan Statistical Areas are defined by the U.S. Office of  Management and Budget (OMB) based on data gathered by the Census Bureau.  The OMB locates these  areas around a densely populated core, typically a city, of at least 50,000 people.  Counties that have  strong commuting ties to the core are then included in the definition of the metropolitan area.  The  OMB  currently  identifies  366  metropolitan  areas  nationwide,  with  populations  ranging  from  55,000  (Carson City, NV) to 19 million (New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island, NY‐NJ‐PA).    Within this group of metropolitan areas, this report concentrates the bulk of its attention on the 100  largest, which in 2008 coincided almost exactly with those metro areas having populations of at least  500,000.    While  there  is  nothing  especially  magical  about  the  half  million‐person  threshold,  these  metropolitan  areas  are  fairly  recognizable  places  to  most  Americans.    Moreover,  nearly  all  of  their  largest  cities  have  populations  of  at  least  100,000.    Even  more  remarkably,  these  large  metro  areas  continue to slowly but steadily increase their share of the nation’s population.  At the turn of the 20th  century, 44 percent of Americans lived in the counties that today make up the 100 largest metro areas.   By 2000 that share had risen to 65 percent, and by 2009 reached 66 percent.    Figures  within  this  report  are  based  on  single‐family  residential  properties,  and  future  job  growth  percentages are 10‐year projections unless otherwise noted.    Forecasts are created by over one dozen economists and real estate professionals providing data for the  economic forecast model. Data sources include but are not limited to the following:  U.S. Census Bureau,  Bureau  of  Labor  Statistics,  Consumer  Price  Index,  Federal  Housing  Finance  Agency  (FHFA),  Uniform  Crime  Reports,  Federal  Bureau  of  Investigation,  Consumer  Expenditure  Survey  Index,  Moody’s  Economy.com, The Brookings Institution, National Association of Realtors, State Association of Realtors,  National Association of Home Builders, Hanley Wood and the Expert Metropolitan Board. 
  4. 4. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 4  Change in Housing Prices in the Largest 100 Metropolitan Areas    The map below displays the change in the Federal Housing Finance Administration’s House Price Index (HPI), which  measures the price of single‐family properties whose mortgages have been purchased or securitized by Fannie  Mae or Freddie Mac, from the trough quarter to the third quarter of 2012, for the 100 largest metro areas.      Most of these metro areas (88) saw home values rise during the third quarter of 2012, providing evidence that a  broadly rooted recovery is underway in the market.  It is a nascent recovery, however, with the second quarter of  2013 marking the low point of the housing market for more than three‐quarters (76) of large metro areas.    The strongest performances over the last quarter were in those parts of the country hardest hit by the housing  crisis.  Phoenix, Modesto, North Port, Lakeland, and Bakersfield led the way during the quarter and seven of the  top ten performing metro areas were in Florida or California.  The Intermountain West region also performed well,  and Jackson (MS), Augusta (GA), and Detroit – itself among the hardest hit metro areas – rounded out the top  performers.    With the strongest recoveries occurring in the places that were hardest hit — and the recovery period limited to  just one quarter in most places — it is not surprising that these are also the places with the furthest left to go.   Home prices are down by more than 60 percent in Las Vegas, Modesto, and Stockton from their pre‐recession  peaks.  Of the 22 markets where home values are down by more than 40 percent, 17 are in California or Florida.    Sources:  The Brookings Institution, Federal Housing Finance Administration (fhfa.gov). 
  5. 5. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 5  1.  McAllen–Edinburg–Mission, Texas        Population:  774,769   Peak House Price:  2006 Q4 Population Change:  (since 2000)  36.1%   Trough House Price:  2011 Q2     Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  0.2% Cost of Living Index:  (US avg. = 100)  75         Foreclosure Activity:  (6 month trend)  Rising Unemployment Rate:  11.0%   Foreclosure Ratio:  (% of total units)  0.02% Recent Job Growth:  2.8%     (US avg= 0.11%) Future Job Growth:  (10 year)  34.6%   Median Sales Price:  (Nov ‘12 ‐ Jan ‘13)  $60,500     Change:  (Year‐over‐Year)  ‐ 40.1% Peak Unemployment:  2007 Q4     Trough Unemployment:  2010 Q4   Appreciation Forecast:  (3 Year) 20.8% Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  ‐ 1.20%   Appreciation Forecast:  (5 Year) 33.2%                
  6. 6. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 6  2.  Las Vegas–Paradise, Nevada        Population:  1,951,269   Peak House Price:  2006 Q4 Population Change:  (since 2000)  41.7%   Trough House Price:  2012 Q2     Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  1.9% Cost of Living Index:  (US avg. = 100)  95         Foreclosure Activity:  (6 month trend)  Rising Unemployment Rate:  12.5%   Foreclosure Ratio:  (% of total units)  0.35% Recent Job Growth:  ‐ 0.8%     (US avg= 0.11%) Future Job Growth:  (10 year)  25.9%   Median Sales Price:  (Nov ‘12 ‐ Jan ‘13)  $142,000     Change:  (Year‐over‐Year)  29.1% Peak Unemployment:  2006 Q3     Trough Unemployment:  2010 Q4   Appreciation Forecast:  (3 Year) 16.5% Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  ‐ 2.60%   Appreciation Forecast:  (5 Year) 27.9%              
  7. 7. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 7  3.  Colorado Springs, Colorado        Population:  645,613   Peak House Price:  2006 Q4 Population Change:  (since 2000)  20.1%   Trough House Price:  2012 Q2     Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  1.8% Cost of Living Index:  (US avg. = 100)  101         Foreclosure Activity:  (6 month trend)  Falling Unemployment Rate:  8.7%   Foreclosure Ratio:  (% of total units)  0.10% Recent Job Growth:  1.1%     (US avg= 0.11%) Future Job Growth:  (10 year)  33.6%   Median Sales Price:  (Nov ‘12 ‐ Jan ‘13)  $188,950     Change:  (Year‐over‐Year)  11.1% Peak Unemployment:  2007 Q1     Trough Unemployment:  2010 Q3   Appreciation Forecast:  (3 Year) 15.4% Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  ‐ 0.48%   Appreciation Forecast:  (5 Year) 24.7%                
  8. 8. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 8  4.  Phoenix–Mesa–Glendale, Arizona        Population:  4,192,887   Peak House Price:  2006 Q4 Population Change:  (since 2000)  29.0%   Trough House Price:  2011 Q2     Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  10.1% Cost of Living Index:  (US avg. = 100)  94         Foreclosure Activity:  (6 month trend)  Falling Unemployment Rate:  7.7%   Foreclosure Ratio:  (% of total units)  0.21% Recent Job Growth:  ‐ 0.1%     (US avg= 0.11%) Future Job Growth:  (10 year)  32.1%   Median Sales Price:  (Nov ‘12 ‐ Jan ‘13)  $133,000     Change:  (Year‐over‐Year)  47.9% Peak Unemployment:  2007 Q2     Trough Unemployment:  2010 Q1   Appreciation Forecast:  (3 Year) 15.3% Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  ‐ 3.24%   Appreciation Forecast:  (5 Year) 26.2%                
  9. 9. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 9  5.  North Port–Bradenton–Sarasota, Florida        Population:  702,281   Peak House Price:  2006 Q1 Population Change:  (since 2000)  21.4%   Trough House Price:  2012 Q2     Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  3.8% Cost of Living Index:  (US avg. = 100)  98         Foreclosure Activity:  (6 month trend)  Falling Unemployment Rate:  10.1%   Foreclosure Ratio:  (% of total units)  0.46% Recent Job Growth:  ‐ 1.3%     (US avg= 0.11%) Future Job Growth:  (10 year)  27.4%   Median Sales Price:  (Nov ‘12 ‐ Jan ‘13)  $114,500     Change:  (Year‐over‐Year)  33.6% Peak Unemployment:  2006 Q1     Trough Unemployment:  2010 Q1   Appreciation Forecast:  (3 Year) 15.1% Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  ‐ 3.68%   Appreciation Forecast:  (5 Year) 25.0%                
  10. 10. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 10  6.  Tucson, Arizona        Population:  980,263   Peak House Price:  2006 Q4 Population Change:  (since 2000)  16.2%   Trough House Price:  2012 Q2     Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  1.6% Cost of Living Index:  (US avg. = 100)  97         Foreclosure Activity:  (6 month trend)  Falling Unemployment Rate:  7.6%   Foreclosure Ratio:  (% of total units)  0.20% Recent Job Growth:  ‐ 1.2%     (US avg= 0.11%) Future Job Growth:  (10 year)  30.0%   Median Sales Price:  (Nov ‘12 ‐ Jan ‘13)  $134,000     Change:  (Year‐over‐Year)  16.5% Peak Unemployment:  2007 Q2     Trough Unemployment:  2009 Q4   Appreciation Forecast:  (3 Year) 14.2% Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  ‐ 2.76%   Appreciation Forecast:  (5 Year) 23.9%                
  11. 11. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 11  7.  Tulsa, Oklahoma        Population:  937,478   Peak House Price:  2009 Q1 Population Change:  (since 2000)  9.1%   Trough House Price:  2012 Q3     Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  0.0% Cost of Living Index:  (US avg. = 100)  91         Foreclosure Activity:  (6 month trend)  Falling Unemployment Rate:  6.4%   Foreclosure Ratio:  (% of total units)  0.13% Recent Job Growth:  0.2%     (US avg= 0.11%) Future Job Growth:  (10 year)  34.0%   Median Sales Price:  (Nov ‘12 ‐ Jan ‘13)  $153,875     Change:  (Year‐over‐Year)  22.1% Peak Unemployment:  2008 Q1     Trough Unemployment:  2009 Q4   Appreciation Forecast:  (3 Year) 14.2% Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  ‐ 2.52%   Appreciation Forecast:  (5 Year) 23.9%                
  12. 12. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 12  8.  Denver–Aurora–Broomfield, Colorado        Population:  2,543,487   Peak House Price:  2005 Q1 Population Change:  (since 2000)  16.7%   Trough House Price:  2011 Q2     Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  2.7% Cost of Living Index:  (US avg. = 100)  112         Foreclosure Activity:  (6 month trend)  Falling Unemployment Rate:  7.9%   Foreclosure Ratio:  (% of total units)  0.08% Recent Job Growth:  1.9%     (US avg= 0.11%) Future Job Growth:  (10 year)  35.8%   Median Sales Price:  (Nov ‘12 ‐ Jan ‘13)  $230,750     Change:  (Year‐over‐Year)  21.5% Peak Unemployment:  2007 Q1     Trough Unemployment:  2010 Q1   Appreciation Forecast:  (3 Year) 13.9% Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  ‐ 1.17%   Appreciation Forecast:  (5 Year) 22.7%                
  13. 13. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 13  9.  Sacramento–Arden–Arcade–Roseville, California        Population:  2,149,127   Peak House Price:  2005 Q4 Population Change:  (since 2000)  19.6%   Trough House Price:  2012 Q2     Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  2.6% Cost of Living Index:  (US avg. = 100)  118         Foreclosure Activity:  (6 month trend)  Falling Unemployment Rate:  10.9%   Foreclosure Ratio:  (% of total units)  0.15% Recent Job Growth:  ‐ 0.2%     (US avg= 0.11%) Future Job Growth:  (10 year)  28.8%   Median Sales Price:  (Nov ‘12 ‐ Jan ‘13)  $156,000     Change:  (Year‐over‐Year)  24.8% Peak Unemployment:  2006 Q3     Trough Unemployment:  2010 Q3   Appreciation Forecast:  (3 Year) 13.6% Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  ‐ 2.42%   Appreciation Forecast:  (5 Year) 21.2%                
  14. 14. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 14  10.  Cleveland–Elyria–Mentor, Ohio        Population:  2,077,240   Peak House Price:  2005 Q1 Population Change:  (since 2000)  3.19%   Trough House Price:  2012 Q2     Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  0.5% Cost of Living Index:  (US avg. = 100)  98         Foreclosure Activity:  (6 month trend)  Falling Unemployment Rate:  7.7%   Foreclosure Ratio:  (% of total units)  0.18% Recent Job Growth:  0.7%     (US avg= 0.11%) Future Job Growth:  (10 year)  33.7%   Median Sales Price:  (Nov ‘12 ‐ Jan ‘13)  $55,550     Change:  (Year‐over‐Year)  18.2% Peak Unemployment:  2006 Q1     Trough Unemployment:  2009 Q3   Appreciation Forecast:  (3 Year) 12.6% Change:  (Trough to 2012 Q3)  ‐ 2.21%   Appreciation Forecast:  (5 Year) 20.2%                
  15. 15. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 15  Top 100 Metropolitan Markets    Metropolitan Area (MSA)  Peak Quarter  House Price  Trough Quarter  House Price  Price: Trough   to 2012 Q3  3‐Year  Forecast  5‐Year  Forecast  1  McAllen‐Edinburg‐Mission, TX  2006 Q4 2011 Q2 0.2%  20.8% 33.2% 2  Las Vegas‐Paradise, NV  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 1.9%  16.5% 27.9% 3  Colorado Springs, CO  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 1.8%  15.4% 24.7% 4  Phoenix‐Mesa‐Glendale, AZ  2006 Q4 2011 Q2 10.1%  15.3% 26.2% 5  North Port‐Bradenton‐Sarasota, FL  2006 Q1 2012 Q2 3.8%  15.1% 25.0% 6  Tucson, AZ  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 1.6%  14.2% 23.9% 7  Tulsa, OK  2009 Q1 2012 Q3 0.0%  14.2% 23.9% 8  Denver‐Aurora‐Broomfield, CO  2005 Q1 2011 Q2 2.7%  13.9% 22.7% 9  Sacramento‐Arden‐Arcade‐Roseville, CA  2005 Q4 2012 Q2 2.6%  13.6% 21.2% 10  Cleveland‐Elyria‐Mentor, OH  2005 Q1 2012 Q2 0.5%  12.6% 20.2% 11  Hartford‐West Hartford‐East Hartford, CT  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.2%  12.5% 19.3% 12  Springfield, MA  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.3%  12.5% 19.3% 13  Jackson, MS  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 1.9%  12.5% 20.0% 14  Columbia, SC  2006 Q4 2012 Q3 0.0%  12.3% 20.4% 15  Toledo, OH  2005 Q1 2012 Q2 0.3%  12.3% 19.5% 16  Ogden‐Clearfield, UT  2007 Q4 2012 Q2 1.5%  12.3% 20.5% 17  Youngstown‐Warren‐Boardman, OH‐PA  2005 Q1 2012 Q3 0.0%  12.2% 19.6% 18  Albuquerque, NM  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 1.3%  12.1% 19.9% 19  Greenville‐Mouldin‐Easley, SC  2009 Q1 2012 Q2 1.3%  11.8% 19.5% 20  San Francisco‐Oakland‐Fremont, CA  2006 Q1 2012 Q2 2.6%  11.7% 20.0% 21  Oxnard‐Thousand Oaks‐Ventura, CA  2006 Q1 2012 Q2 1.9%  11.6% 17.8% 22  Poughkeepsie‐Newburgh‐Middletown, NY  2006 Q4 2012 Q3 0.0%  11.6% 18.4% 23  Wichita, KS  2009 Q1 2012 Q3 0.0%  11.5% 19.1% 24  Dallas‐Fort Worth‐Arlington, TX  2009 Q1 2011 Q2 1.0%  11.4% 19.1% 25  Provo‐Orem, UT  2007 Q3 2011 Q2 1.2%  11.4% 19.3% 26  Pittsburgh, PA  2006 Q4 2012 Q1 0.6%  11.4% 18.7% 27  El Paso, TX  2008 Q1 2012 Q2 0.1%  11.4% 19.0% 28  Indianapolis‐Carmel, IN  2005 Q1 2012 Q2 0.6%  11.4% 18.6% 29  Worcester, MA  2005 Q3 2012 Q2 0.4%  11.3% 18.2% 30  Riverside‐San Bernardino‐Ontario, CA  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 1.6%  11.2% 17.4% 31  Baltimore‐Towson, MD  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.8%  11.0% 19.5% 32  Salt Lake City, UT  2007 Q3 2012 Q2 2.6%  10.9% 19.2% 33  Austin‐Round Rock‐San Marcos, TX  2009 Q1 2011 Q2 2.6%  10.9% 18.6% 34  Augusta‐Richmond County, GA‐SC  2009 Q1 2012 Q2 3.0%  10.9% 18.1% 35  Modesto, CA  2006 Q1 2012 Q2 4.1%  10.8% 16.1% 36  Seattle‐Tacoma‐Bellevue, WA  2007 Q3 2012 Q2 2.1%  10.8% 19.2% 37  Des Moines‐West Des Moines, IA  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.8%  10.7% 17.9% 38  Boston‐Cambridge‐Quincy, MA‐NH  2005 Q3 2012 Q2 0.7%  10.6% 17.5% 39  Albany‐Schenectady‐Troy, NY  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 1.0%  10.6% 17.7% 40  Boise City‐Nampa, ID  2006 Q4 2011 Q2 7.5%  10.6% 18.1% 41  Stockton, CA  2006 Q1 2012 Q2 3.2%  10.5% 16.1% 42  Birmingham‐Hoover, AL  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.3%  10.5% 17.3% 43  Houston‐Sugar Land‐Baytown, TX  2009 Q1 2011 Q2 2.9%  10.5% 17.6% 44  Fresno, CA  2006 Q1 2012 Q2 2.6%  10.4% 16.4% 45  Cape Coral‐Fort Myers, FL  2006 Q1 2011 Q3 6.1%  10.4% 19.2% 46  Buffalo‐Niagara Falls, NY  2009 Q1 2012 Q2 0.9%  10.3% 16.7% 47  Louisville‐Jefferson County, KY‐IN  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.4%  10.3% 17.0% 48  Chattanooga, TN‐GA  2007 Q1 2012 Q3 0.0%  10.3% 16.8%
  16. 16. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 16  49  Washington‐Arlington‐Alexandria, DC‐VA‐MD 2006 Q4 2012 Q2 1.4%  10.2% 18.7% 50  Dayton, OH  2005 Q1 2012 Q2 0.5%  10.1% 16.6% 51  Syracuse, NY  2007 Q2 2012 Q2 0.2%  9.8% 16.2% 52  Scranton‐Wilkes‐Barre, PA  2007 Q1 2011 Q2 1.3%  9.8% 15.5% 53  Little Rock‐North Little Rock‐Conway, AR  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.0%  9.8% 16.4% 54  Rochester, NY  2005 Q2 2012 Q2 0.1%  9.8% 16.0% 55  Nashville‐Davidson‐Murfreesboro‐Franklin, TN 2007 Q1 2012 Q2 1.5%  9.5% 15.9% 56  Omaha‐Council Bluffs, NE‐IA  2005 Q1 2012 Q3 0.0%  9.4% 15.6% 57  New Haven‐Milford, CT  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.1%  9.4% 16.6% 58  Memphis, TN‐MS‐AR  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 1.6%  9.4% 15.3% 59  Baton Rouge, LA  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.8%  9.4% 15.7% 60  Cincinnati‐Middletown, OH‐KY‐IN  2005 Q1 2012 Q3 0.0%  9.4% 15.3% 61  Atlanta‐Sandy Springs‐Marietta, GA  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 1.1%  9.4% 15.7% 62  New York‐N. New Jersey‐Long Island, NY‐NJ‐PA 2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.2%  9.3% 16.8% 63  New Orleans‐Metairie‐Kenner, LA  2007 Q1 2011 Q2 1.4%  9.3% 15.0% 64  St. Louis, MO‐IL  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.1%  9.2% 15.6% 65  Bakersfield‐Delano, CA  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 3.3%  9.2% 14.5% 66  Kansas City, MO‐KS  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.8%  9.1% 15.5% 67  Los Angeles‐Long Beach‐Santa Ana, CA  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 1.4%  9.1% 15.8% 68  San Antonio‐New Braunfels, TX  2009 Q1 2012 Q3 0.0%  9.1% 15.5% 69  Lakeland‐Winter Haven, FL  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 3.5%  9.0% 16.2% 70  Bridgeport‐Stamford‐Norwalk, CT  2006 Q1 2012 Q2 0.5%  8.9% 16.5% 71  Providence‐New Bedford‐Fall River, RI‐MA  2006 Q1 2012 Q2 0.4%  8.9% 15.0% 72  San Jose‐Sunnyvale‐Santa Clara, CA  2006 Q4 2012 Q1 3.2%  8.8% 15.9% 73  San Diego‐Carlsbad‐San Marcos, CA  2005 Q4 2012 Q2 1.8%  8.8% 14.7% 74  Portland‐Vancouver‐Hillsboro, OR‐WA  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 2.3%  8.7% 15.7% 75  Oklahoma City, OK  2007 Q1 2011 Q2 1.2%  8.7% 14.8% 76  Palm Bay‐Melbourne‐Titusville, FL  2006 Q1 2012 Q2 1.8%  8.6% 15.5% 77  Columbus, OH  2005 Q1 2012 Q2 1.3%  8.5% 13.6% 78  Charleston‐North Charleston‐Summerville, SC 2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.6%  8.4% 14.4% 79  Harrisburg‐Carlisle, PA  2007 Q1 2012 Q3 0.0%  8.2% 13.4% 80  Virginia Beach‐Norfolk‐Newport News, VA‐NC 2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.7%  8.1% 15.7% 81  Akron, OH  2005 Q1 2012 Q2 0.3%  8.0% 13.2% 82  Greensboro‐High Point, NC  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.2%  7.9% 13.5% 83  Chicago‐Naperville‐Joliet, IL‐IN‐WI  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.6%  7.6% 13.2% 84  Philadelphia‐Camden‐Wilmington, PA‐NJ‐DE‐MD 2006 Q4 2012 Q3 0.0%  7.4% 13.3% 85  Detroit‐Warren‐Livonia, MI  2005 Q1 2012 Q2 1.9%  7.3% 11.9% 86  Minneapolis‐St. Paul‐Bloomington, MN‐WI  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 1.2%  7.0% 12.3% 87  Raleigh‐Cary, NC  2009 Q1 2012 Q2 1.3%  6.8% 11.5% 88  Tampa‐St. Petersburg‐Clearwater, FL  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 2.3%  6.7% 13.2% 89  Lancaster, PA  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 1.3%  6.7% 11.1% 90  Grand Rapids‐Wyoming, MI  2005 Q1 2012 Q2 1.0%  6.7% 10.7% 91  Madison, WI  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.1%  6.5% 11.2% 92  Knoxville, TN  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.7%  6.3% 10.6% 93  Allentown‐Bethlehem‐Easton, PA‐NJ  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.9%  6.2% 12.7% 94  Richmond, VA  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.2%  5.9% 10.8% 95  Charlotte‐Gastonia‐Rock Hill, NC‐SC  2009 Q1 2012 Q2 1.3%  5.4% 9.6% 96  Milwaukee‐Waukesha‐West Allis, WI  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 0.7%  5.4% 9.7% 97  Honolulu, HI  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 0.8%  3.9% 7.0% 98  Jacksonville, FL  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 2.7%  3.6% 8.4% 99  Miami‐Fort Lauderdale‐Pompano Beach, FL  2006 Q4 2012 Q2 2.3%  3.6% 8.1% 100  Orlando‐Kissimmee‐Sanford, FL  2007 Q1 2012 Q2 1.6%  3.1% 7.9%   Top 100 Largest Metro Averages  2006 Q4 2012 Q1 1.4% 
  17. 17. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 17  Understanding the Graphs    Total Employment and Unemployment  Total employment refers to non‐farm wage and salaried employees in the area.  The unemployment rate is the percentage of  unemployed persons in the region’s labor force. Employment data are based upon a survey of businesses, while unemployment  rate information is based upon a survey of households.    How to Use It  Total employment and the unemployment rate typically have an inverse relationship.  These metrics can be used to determine  the  health  of  the  local  labor  market.    Jobs  are  a  major  factor  for  housing  demand.    High  levels  of  employment  and  low  unemployment rates tend to lead to healthier housing markets.      Annualized Net Migration  The difference between the number of people who immigrate in and emigrate out of a particular region.  These graphs show  annualized data updated monthly.    How to Use It  Can be used to forecast population trends.  Migration trends can be indicative of demographic and employment trends in a  particular area.  Market areas with substantial inflows of new residents will have greater demand for new and existing homes.  Market areas with negative net migration will have less demand for additional homes.      Market Share of Home Sales  Displays home closing share by sale type with each type representing their percentage of the entire market.  Sale types are New  Homes, Regular Resale Homes (typical resale transactions between private parties), REO Sales (Real‐Estate Owned by Banks),  and Foreclosures (properties being transferred from homeowners to mortgage holders).    How to Use It  Communicates the segments in the local housing market which are most active in the current month as well as in the same  month one and two years prior.  Seeing the change in percentage from one year to a next is an indicator of the performance of  that  sale  type.    This  can  also  be  a  gauge  of  market  health;  for  instance,  a  large  percentage  of  activity  in  REO  Sales  and  Foreclosure Sales may imply a distressed market.      Year over Year Change in Price and Price/Sq Ft  Displays the average closing sales amount and the average price per square foot for the current month along with the same  month a year ago and the year prior to that.  These price metrics include all re‐sales, REO sales, and new home sales in the  market and therefore take into account all arm’s length transactions.    How to Use It  Provides a trending view of year‐over‐year pricing in the market.  Year‐over‐year comparisons are more reliable to follow than  month‐over‐month as seasonal differences can impact monthly trends.  Taken together, the two pricing trends enable reliable  insights into the pricing strength of the market.  A positive trend in both indicates a healthy and strong market.  A negative  trend in both reveals weakness.  A mixed trend, such as one where the average closing price is increasing but price per square  foot is decreasing reflects likely changes in product mix and so conflicting pricing trends do not provide reliable insights in such  a mixed scenario.   
  18. 18. www.NoradaRealEstate.com Page 18  About Us    Norada Real Estate Investments  Norada Real Estate Investments is a premier real estate investment firm providing investors with quality  new and refurbished investment properties in growth markets throughout the United States.     Our turnkey rental properties, ranging from single‐family homes to fourplex multi‐units, make financial  sense the day you buy them and provide investors with good wealth‐building investments.    Norada Real Estate Investments helps take the guesswork out of real estate investing.  By researching  top real estate growth markets and structuring complete turn‐key real estate investments, we help you  succeed by minimizing risk and maximizing profitability.    Marco Santarelli  Marco Santarelli is an investor, author, and the founder of Norada Real Estate Investments.  He is also  the creator of DealGrader™ – a scoring system that measures the investment quality of a real estate  investment, giving you an overall snapshot of its profitability and investment risk.    Marco purchased his first real estate investment at the age of 18 and successfully handled the entire  process from rehabilitating the property to actively managing it without ever reading a book or taking a  course on the subject.    Because of his love and passion for real estate, and his desire to help others succeed in building their  wealth through real estate, he founded Norada Real Estate Investments in 2003.    Today, Marco Santarelli is a licensed California real estate broker and continues to run his successful real  estate firm with a focus on helping other investors build wealth through the power of real estate.      LEGAL DISCLAIMER AND TERMS OF USE    You do not have resell rights or giveaway rights to any portion of this Publication.  Only customers that have purchased this publication are authorized to view it. This publication contains  material protected under International and Federal Copyright Laws and Treaties.  No part of this publication may be transmitted or reproduced in any way without the prior written permission  of the author.  Violations of this copyright will be enforced to the full extent of the law.    The information and resources provided in this publication are based upon the current real estate environment.  The information presented in this publication may change, cease or expand  with time.  We cannot be held responsible for changes that may affect the applicability of this information.    The reader understands that no warranty may be created from the information contained herein and it may not be suitable for your specific situation.  Reader also understands that the  information contained herein is not a recommendation for any particular property, transaction, real estate market, or investment strategy.  Reader further understands that none of the  information provided is advice concerning the nature, potential, value, or suitability of any particular property, real estate market, transaction, investment strategy, or other matter.  To the  extent any of the content may be deemed to be investment advice, such information is impersonal and not tailored to the investment needs of any specific person.    All product names, logos and artwork are copyrights of their respective owners.  None of the owners have sponsored or endorsed this publication.  While all attempts have been made to verify  information provided, the author assumes no responsibility for errors, omissions, or contrary interpretation on the subject matter herein.  Any perceived slights of peoples or organizations are  unintentional.  The purchaser or reader of this publication assumes responsibility for the use of these materials and information.  No guarantees of income are made.  The author reserves the  right to make changes and assumes no responsibility or liability whatsoever on behalf of any reader or purchaser of these materials.     

×