2nd Annual Native American
Economic Development & Diversification Conference
Bringing Sufficient Healthcare to Indian Coun...
Timeline:
 Indian affairs were administered by the War
Department until 1849.
 1849: Office of Indian Affairs was transf...
“The health issues facing American Indians in the
[U.S.] make them the most at-risk minority in the
country, and yet, the ...
 American Indians/Alaska Natives have Diabetes
rates two to three times that among non-Hispanic
whites .
 Alcohol-relate...
Case Study
Appalachian Regional Healthcare System (ARHS).
The Appalachian region shares many of the
parameters that defin...
Case Study
Southcentral Foundation (SCF)
 Alaska Native-owned healthcare
organization serving Alaska Native and
American ...
Tribal health program benefits go
beyond health care
 Sovereignty
 Culturally appropriate counseling and
treatment
 Val...
Tribal Health Care Systems are
also Economic Drivers
HomeCare Stores and Pharmacies
Hotel

Hospitality Training & Jobs
Tra...
Contact:
Joseph F. Nowoslawski M.D.
Medical Director
American Hospital Service Group, Inc.
415 Eagleview Boulevard, Suite ...
Contact:
Joseph F. Nowoslawski M.D.
Medical Director
American Hospital Service Group, Inc.
415 Eagleview Boulevard, Suite ...
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Joseph Nowoslawski Tribal Healthcare

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Overview of Tribal Healthcare systems as economic drivers. Case studies with solutions.

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  • Joseph Nowoslawski Tribal Healthcare

    1. 1. 2nd Annual Native American Economic Development & Diversification Conference Bringing Sufficient Healthcare to Indian Country: Beyond Healthcare: Tribal HC Systems as Economic Drivers Joseph F. Nowoslawski M.D. Medical Director www.americanhospital.us
    2. 2. Timeline:  Indian affairs were administered by the War Department until 1849.  1849: Office of Indian Affairs was transferred from the War Department to the then newly formed Department of the Interior.  Health care became a major challenge for the Office of Indian Affairs and remained so throughout its tenure.  1890-1925 program of assimilation of Native Americans into white culture dominated reservation health care during this period.  1928: Meriam Commission issues a report documenting substandard health conditions due to government inefficiency and lack of adequate funding.  1954: transfer of Native American health services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to the Public Health Service (PHS).  The Indian Health Service (IHS) began on July 1, 1955.  Management of Indian health programs has recently shifted from the IHS to tribes. PHS photo, late 1960s Today, over half of the current IHS budget is managed by tribal health programs.
    3. 3. “The health issues facing American Indians in the [U.S.] make them the most at-risk minority in the country, and yet, the Indian Health Service receives only 55% of the funds it needs.” -Peter Bresko, columnist, Fargo Forum, Sep 22 2008 Indian Health Service per capita health care expenditures are much lower than those of other health care systems in the United States. …”the failure of the federal government to adequately fund the Indian Health Service for the provision of care to the 1.8 million patients it is supposed to serve means that the promises of treaties signed in the 1800s have never been fulfilled.” Yvette Roubideaux, M.D., M.P.H. Beyond Red Lake — The Persistent Crisis in American Indian Health Care Nov. 3, 2005 Indian Health Service Data Underfunding consistently results in inadequate facilities, frequent staff turnover, delays in diagnosis and care, and rules that favor the system rather than the patient.
    4. 4.  American Indians/Alaska Natives have Diabetes rates two to three times that among non-Hispanic whites .  Alcohol-related death rates are 7.4 times as high among American Indians and Alaska Natives as in the overall U.S. population.  American Indians/Alaska Natives also have a high prevalence and risk factors for mental health and suicide, obesity, substance abuse, and liver disease.  American Indians and Alaska Natives have an infant death rate almost double the rate for Caucasians.  American Indian/Alaska Native men were twice as likely to be diagnosed with stomach and liver cancers as in the overall U.S. population.  American Indian Women were 20% more likely to die from cervical cancer compared to the overall U.S. population.  In general, American Indian/Alaska Native adults are 60% more likely to have a stroke than their White adult counterparts. Trends in Indian Health, 2000–2001 All of these disease states are associated with poverty and lack of access to medical care
    5. 5. Case Study Appalachian Regional Healthcare System (ARHS). The Appalachian region shares many of the parameters that define indian Country – a large clanbased population with strong ties to the land, poverty and similar health problems such as diabetes, obesity, substance abuse, and strokes. ARH is a not-for-profit health system serving 350,000 residents across Eastern Kentucky and Southern West Virginia. Partnered with School of Nursing at Appalachian State University to “grow” its own local nursing staff and build an Allied Health Education facility  With over more than 4,000 employees, ARH is the largest provider of care and single largest employer in southeastern Kentucky and the third largest private employer in southern West Virginia. ARHS Blowing Rock Hospital
    6. 6. Case Study Southcentral Foundation (SCF)  Alaska Native-owned healthcare organization serving Alaska Native and American Indian people living in Anchorage, the Mat-Su Valley, and 60 rural villages.  Committed to recruiting and training Native staff.  established a Traditional Healing Program and culturally-sensitive counseling along with Western medicine.  serves 46,800+ Alaska Native and American Indian people  employs more than 1,200 people in 65 programs SCF Traditional Healing staff
    7. 7. Tribal health program benefits go beyond health care  Sovereignty  Culturally appropriate counseling and treatment  Values-based / family-based  Restoration of Trust = better compliance  meets the needs of a growing elder population  Medical-professional job generation for youth  Allows for tribal-specific research IHS photo, 1980 Tribal health systems can allow you to control your own physical, spiritual, and financial future
    8. 8. Tribal Health Care Systems are also Economic Drivers HomeCare Stores and Pharmacies Hotel Hospitality Training & Jobs Transportation Spiritual and Wellness Center for Tourism Co-Op for Healthy Food Medical Research Center Administration Center Hospital Allied Health Education for Indian youth Staff Jobs Community Center clinics Retirement Community Medical Scholarships Construction * Tribal Health Care System *Groundbreaking ;Anchorage Native Primary Care Center expansion
    9. 9. Contact: Joseph F. Nowoslawski M.D. Medical Director American Hospital Service Group, Inc. 415 Eagleview Boulevard, Suite 108 Exton, PA 19341-2239 Phone: 1-800-872-8626, Ext. 280 Fax: 610-524-0948 Website: www.americanhospital.us
    10. 10. Contact: Joseph F. Nowoslawski M.D. Medical Director American Hospital Service Group, Inc. 415 Eagleview Boulevard, Suite 108 Exton, PA 19341-2239 Phone: 1-800-872-8626, Ext. 280 Fax: 610-524-0948 Website: www.americanhospital.us

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