Stories About the Steps game design concept slides
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Stories About the Steps game design concept slides

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See the game design concept documentation for these slides at: http://jackieflynt.wordpress.com/projects/games-and-learning/gamedesigndocumentation/ ...

See the game design concept documentation for these slides at: http://jackieflynt.wordpress.com/projects/games-and-learning/gamedesigndocumentation/

These slides were created for a draft presentation on a game design concept, Stories About the Steps. The design was conceived for the graduate course, Games and Learning, in the Information and Learning Technologies M.A. program at University of Colorado Denver.

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  • Game OverviewStories About the Steps teaches the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of 12-step programs for addiction recovery.
  • Game OverviewStories About the Steps teaches the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of 12-step programs for addiction recovery.
  • Game OverviewStories About the Steps teaches the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of 12-step programs for addiction recovery.
  • Game OverviewStories About the Steps teaches the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of 12-step programs for addiction recovery.
  • Game OverviewStories About the Steps teaches the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of 12-step programs for addiction recovery.
  • Stories About the Steps is an educational video game that’s online and optionally social. Stories About the Steps may also be classified as a casual game and trivia game. It’s designed especially for mobile computing devices and integration with social media applications. The game offers social learning elements and leverages digital badging systems to support user engagement.. For examples of digital badging systems, see Badgeville’s website for descriptions of how its product, The Behavior Platform, increases user engagement in marketing. And see BadgeOS’s website for examples of digital badging applications in learning contexts.
  • Stories About the Steps is an educational video game that’s online and optionally social. Stories About the Steps may also be classified as a casual game and trivia game. It’s designed especially for mobile computing devices and integration with social media applications. The game offers social learning elements and leverages digital badging systems to support user engagement. For examples of digital badging systems, see Badgeville’s website for descriptions of how its product, The Behavior Platform, increases user engagement in marketing. And see BadgeOS’s website for examples of digital badging applications in learning contexts.
  • Stories About the Steps is an educational video game that’s online and optionally social. Stories About the Steps may also be classified as a casual game and trivia game. It’s designed especially for mobile computing devices and integration with social media applications. The game offers social learning elements and leverages digital badging systems to support user engagement. For examples of digital badging systems, see Badgeville’s website for descriptions of how its product, The Behavior Platform, increases user engagement in marketing. And see BadgeOS’s website for examples of digital badging applications in learning contexts.
  • Stories About the Steps is an educational video game that’s online and optionally social. Stories About the Steps may also be classified as a casual game and trivia game. It’s designed especially for mobile computing devices and integration with social media applications. The game offers social learning elements and leverages digital badging systems to support user engagement. For examples of digital badging systems, see Badgeville’s website for descriptions of how its product, The Behavior Platform, increases user engagement in marketing. And see BadgeOS’s website for examples of digital badging applications in learning contexts.
  • Stories About the Steps is an educational video game that’s online and optionally social. Stories About the Steps may also be classified as a casual game and trivia game. It’s designed especially for mobile computing devices and integration with social media applications. The game offers social learning elements and leverages digital badging systems to support user engagement. For examples of digital badging systems, see Badgeville’s website for descriptions of how its product, The Behavior Platform, increases user engagement in marketing. And see BadgeOS’s website for examples of digital badging applications in learning contexts.
  • Stories About the Steps is an educational video game that’s online and optionally social. Stories About the Steps may also be classified as a casual game and trivia game. It’s designed especially for mobile computing devices and integration with social media applications. The game offers social learning elements and leverages digital badging systems to support user engagement. For examples of digital badging systems, see Badgeville’s website for descriptions of how its product, The Behavior Platform, increases user engagement in marketing. And see BadgeOS’s website for examples of digital badging applications in learning contexts.
  • The Stories About the Steps interface includes hip, high-quality graphics, animation and sound inspired by today’s popular online, social video games Hanging with Friends and Trivie. Graphics are colorful, cheerful and endearing, although not necessarily juvenile. For examples of this visual and audio style, see the images below from Zynga, Inc. and Trivie, Inc, as well as the website zynga with friends.
  • The Stories About the Steps interface includes hip, high-quality graphics, animation and sound inspired by today’s popular online, social video games Hanging with Friends and Trivie. Graphics are colorful, cheerful and endearing, although not necessarily juvenile. For examples of this visual and audio style, see the images below from Zynga, Inc. and Trivie, Inc, as well as the website zynga with friends.
  • Players (“learners”) complete series of challenges, independently and/or collaboratively with other users, in order to earn badges and win the game. Challenges consist of drill-and-practice, matching, and scavenger-hunt learning activities (Horton, 20XX). These activities address two learning objectives that are focused on 12-step programs for addiction recovery, described below.
  • Players (“learners”) complete series of challenges, independently and/or collaboratively with other users, in order to earn badges and win the game. Challenges consist of drill-and-practice, matching, and scavenger-hunt learning activities (Horton, 20XX). These activities address two learning objectives that are focused on 12-step programs for addiction recovery, adapted from described below.
  • Players (“learners”) complete series of challenges, independently and/or collaboratively with other users, in order to earn badges and win the game. Challenges consist of drill-and-practice, matching, and scavenger-hunt learning activities (Horton, 20XX). These activities address two learning objectives that are focused on 12-step programs for addiction recovery, adapted from described below.
  • Learning Objective 1Given specific resources, learners will identify truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs with respect to six program aspects, framed by the Five W's (and one H), as follows:Who 12-step program members are and what is required of themWhat the purpose or intention of 12-step programs isWhere 12-step programs are practicedWhen 12-step programs are practicedWhy people practice 12-step programs (contexts/applications to different addictions or different types of 12-step groups)How the program works and people interpret the spiritual basis for recovery
  • Learning Objective 1Given specific resources, learners will identify truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs with respect to six program aspects, framed by the Five W's (and one H), as follows:Who 12-step program members are and what is required of themWhat the purpose or intention of 12-step programs isWhere 12-step programs are practicedWhen 12-step programs are practicedWhy people practice 12-step programs (contexts/applications to different addictions or different types of 12-step groups)How the program works and people interpret the spiritual basis for recovery
  • Learning Objective 2Given specific resources, learners will identify applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions, or different types of 12-step groups, such as:Alcoholics AnonymousCrystal Meth AnonymousCocaine AnonymousNarcotics AnonymousNicotine AnonymousSelf Mutilation AnonymousOvereaters AnonymousAl-Anon/AlateenFamilies Anonymous
  • Learning Objective 2Given specific resources, learners will identify applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions, or different types of 12-step groups, such as:Alcoholics AnonymousCrystal Meth AnonymousCocaine AnonymousNarcotics AnonymousNicotine AnonymousSelf Mutilation AnonymousOvereaters AnonymousAl-Anon/AlateenFamilies Anonymous
  • Stories About the Steps meets these objectives through facilitating especially Do-type (Horton, 20XX) learning activities, as follows:
  • Learning activity for Objective 1Play a drill-and-practice game (e.g., true-or-false, fill-in-the-blank, sentence-completion) identifying truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs with respect to six program aspects, framed by the Five W's (and one H).
  • Learning activity for Objective 1Play a drill-and-practice game (e.g., true-or-false, fill-in-the-blank, sentence-completion) identifying truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs with respect to six program aspects, framed by the Five W's (and one H).
  • Learning activity for Objective 1Play a drill-and-practice game (e.g., true-or-false, fill-in-the-blank, sentence-completion) identifying truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs with respect to six program aspects, framed by the Five W's (and one H).
  • Learning activity for Objective 1Play a drill-and-practice game (e.g., true-or-false, fill-in-the-blank, sentence-completion) identifying truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs with respect to six program aspects, framed by the Five W's (and one H).
  • Learning activities for Objective 2Play a matching game identifying applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions, or different types of 12-step groups.Select a given type of 12-step group and complete an online scavenger hunt for given content specific to the selected group.
  • Learning activities for Objective 2Play a matching game identifying applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions, or different types of 12-step groups.Select a given type of 12-step group and complete an online scavenger hunt for given content specific to the selected group.
  • Learning activities for Objective 2Play a matching game identifying applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions, or different types of 12-step groups.Select a given type of 12-step group and complete an online scavenger hunt for given content specific to the selected group.
  • Learning activities for Objective 2Play a matching game identifying applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions, or different types of 12-step groups.Select a given type of 12-step group and complete an online scavenger hunt for given content specific to the selected group.
  • The learning problem that needs to be addressed is that of youth learners’ perceptions of 12-step programs for addiction recovery to become more factual and relational (Flynt, 2011). There’s a significant need for more accessible, differentiated instruction about addiction and addiction recovery, especially for the game’s target audience. Stories About the Steps differentiates instruction about 12-step programs for these Millennial youth learners through personal computing devices, gamification, and social learning. Socializing this instruction generalizes the subject matter for learners and incites dialogues around topics. And gamification makes what is generally perceived as heavy, serious subject matter lighter, more engaging, and fun.
  • The learning problem that needs to be addressed is that of youth learners’ perceptions of 12-step programs for addiction recovery to become more factual and relational (Flynt, 2011). There’s a significant need for more accessible, differentiated instruction about addiction and addiction recovery, especially for the game’s target audience. Stories About the Steps differentiates instruction about 12-step programs for these Millennial youth learners through personal computing devices, gamification, and social learning. Socializing this instruction generalizes the subject matter for learners and incites dialogues around topics. And gamification makes what is generally perceived as heavy, serious subject matter lighter, more engaging, and fun.
  • The learning problem that needs to be addressed is that of youth learners’ perceptions of 12-step programs for addiction recovery to become more factual and relational (Flynt, 2011). There’s a significant need for more accessible, differentiated instruction about addiction and addiction recovery, especially for the game’s target audience. Stories About the Steps differentiates instruction about 12-step programs for these Millennial youth learners through personal computing devices, gamification, and social learning. Socializing this instruction generalizes the subject matter for learners and incites dialogues around topics. And gamification makes what is generally perceived as heavy, serious subject matter lighter, more engaging, and fun.
  • The learning problem that needs to be addressed is that of youth learners’ perceptions of 12-step programs for addiction recovery to become more factual and relational (Flynt, 2011). There’s a significant need for more accessible, differentiated instruction about addiction and addiction recovery, especially for the game’s target audience. Stories About the Steps differentiates instruction about 12-step programs for these Millennial youth learners through personal computing devices, gamification, and social learning. Socializing this instruction generalizes the subject matter for learners and incites dialogues around topics. And gamification makes what is generally perceived as heavy, serious subject matter lighter, more engaging, and fun.
  • The learning problem that needs to be addressed is that of youth learners’ perceptions of 12-step programs for addiction recovery to become more factual and relational (Flynt, 2011). There’s a significant need for more accessible, differentiated instruction about addiction and addiction recovery, especially for the game’s target audience. Stories About the Steps differentiates instruction about 12-step programs for these Millennial youth learners through personal computing devices, gamification, and social learning. Socializing this instruction generalizes the subject matter for learners and incites dialogues around topics. And gamification makes what is generally perceived as heavy, serious subject matter lighter, more engaging, and fun.
  • The learning problem that needs to be addressed is that of youth learners’ perceptions of 12-step programs for addiction recovery to become more factual and relational (Flynt, 2011). There’s a significant need for more accessible instruction about addiction and addiction recovery, especially for the game’s target audience. Stories About the Steps differentiates instruction about 12-step programs for these Millennial youth learners through personal computing devices, gamification, and social learning. Socializing this instruction depersonalizes the subject matter for learners and incites dialogues around topics. And gamification makes what is generally perceived as heavy, serious subject matter lighter, more engaging, and fun.
  • The learning problem that needs to be addressed is that of youth learners’ perceptions of 12-step programs for addiction recovery to become more factual and relational (Flynt, 2011). There’s a significant need for more accessible instruction about addiction and addiction recovery, especially for the game’s target audience. Stories About the Steps differentiates instruction about 12-step programs for these Millennial youth learners through personal computing devices, gamification, and social learning. Socializing this instruction depersonalizes the subject matter for learners and incites dialogues around topics. And gamification makes what is generally perceived as heavy, serious subject matter lighter, more engaging, and fun.
  • Audience profile Stories About the Steps is designed for youths (i.e. adolescents or teenagers) between 13 and 19 years old, targeting those in active addiction or at high-risk for developing addictions. As these youths may be in special education or behavioral/addiction treatment programs, the game’s audience includes learners with mental and physical health conditions such as emotional disorders and learning disabilities (Flynt, 2011, May). Although their education levels range between seventh and 12th grades, only an estimated 50 to 75% of learners in special or treatment programs perform at or above the fifth-grade reading level, which the game’s content accommodates (Flynt, 2011, May). Despite emotional and learning disadvantages, the majority of these “Millennial” (Generation Y, 2013) and “digital native” (Homeland Generation, 2013) youths have experience using personal computers and the Internet, at least in academic contexts, and many have prior experience with the game’s content.
  • Audience profile Stories About the Steps is designed for youths (i.e. adolescents or teenagers) between 13 and 19 years old, targeting those in active addiction or at high-risk for developing addictions. As these youths may be in special education or behavioral/addiction treatment programs, the game’s audience includes learners with mental and physical health conditions such as emotional disorders and learning disabilities (Flynt, 2011, May). Although their education levels range between seventh and 12th grades, only an estimated 50 to 75% of learners in special or treatment programs perform at or above the fifth-grade reading level, which the game’s content accommodates (Flynt, 2011, May). Despite emotional and learning disadvantages, the majority of these “Millennial” (Generation Y, 2013) and “digital native” (Homeland Generation, 2013) youths have experience using personal computers and the Internet, at least in academic contexts, and many have prior experience with the game’s content.
  • Audience profile Stories About the Steps is designed for youths (i.e. adolescents or teenagers) between 13 and 19 years old, targeting those in active addiction or at high-risk for developing addictions. As these youths may be in special education or behavioral/addiction treatment programs, the game’s audience includes learners with mental and physical health conditions such as emotional disorders and learning disabilities (Flynt, 2011, May). Although their education levels range between seventh and 12th grades, only an estimated 50 to 75% of learners in special or treatment programs perform at or above the fifth-grade reading level, which the game’s content accommodates (Flynt, 2011, May). Despite emotional and learning disadvantages, the majority of these “Millennial” (Generation Y, 2013) and “digital native” (Homeland Generation, 2013) youths have experience using personal computers and the Internet, at least in academic contexts, and many have prior experience with the game’s content.
  • Members of the Millennial generation, also referred to as “Generation Y,” are said to have been born as late as the early 2000s, or as recent as a decade ago (Generation Y, 2013). Under this definition, the greater portion of the age range of the Stories About the Steps audience may be considered members of this Millennial generation (Generation Y, 2013). In its white paper, Access Technologies Group (2012), described Millennial-generation learners as follows:
  • These individuals:Prefer a self-directed approach to learning.Expect engaging and meaningful visual and auditory input from their learning tools.Insist that what they learn is directly applicable to them and can be put into practice immediately.Enjoy making their own determinations through exploration and experimentation rather than simply being told that something is so.Demand instant gratification and immediate feedback as a result of their short attention spans.Assume that needed information will always be available “on-demand.”Are adept at seeking out and synthesizing data from a multitude of sources.Can effectively perform multiple tasks simultaneously.Value working together as a means of validating and expanding their own insights and belief system. (Access Technologies Group, 2012)
  • Members of the digital native generation, also referred to as “Generation Z” and the “Net Generation,” are said to have been born as early as the mid-1990s, perhaps as long as 18 years ago (Homeland Generation, 2013). Under this definition, the Stories About the Steps audience may be considered members of this digital native generation. In a Learning Solutions Magazine article, Phil Cowcill (2012) listed seven tips for designing eLearning for both Millennial and digital native learners, as follows:
  • Speed. … As professionals, we need to make sure that we have optimized all media elements for a network delivery.Customize. … If learners can customize their learning, then they are more likely to take ownership of it.Push information. ... Let your program push important information to the learner while they are in the course.Collaboration. When learning with technology, it’s still very important to maintain a connection with others. Not everyone plays well with others, but a majority of learners do enjoy a sense of affiliation. For some, it is the affiliation with classmates, coworkers, friends, and even strangers that keeps them motivated to learn. Allowing collaboration will help motivate learners, and it also establishes a sense of accountability. …Fun. Learning has to be fun. … You still need solid content, but the experience the user has while taking your course deserves even more thought. …Deliver what I need. … One good methodology is to use the “test and tell” method. This is where you quiz the learner on something immediately. If they know the answer, they can progress and get some qualitative feedback. However, if they answer wrong, the lesson material will appear. Once they have been through material they can be tested again to ensure they have learned it.Anytime, anywhere. … Generally, if you want the learner to have access anytime and anywhere, you need to look at packaging your content as a native app. This will ensure they can access it anytime, even if there isn’t a connection. (Cowcill, 2012)
  • For Millennial learners, Stories About the Steps is a self-paced learning game that rewards and recognizes learners while offering social learning elements. For both Millennial and digital native learners, Stories About the Steps offers personalization, bite-sized instruction, and mobile learning.
  • For Millennial learners, Stories About the Steps is a self-paced learning game that rewards and recognizes learners while offering social learning elements. For both Millennial and digital native learners, Stories About the Steps offers personalization, bite-sized instruction, and mobile learning.
  • DistributionLearners are introduced to Stories About the Steps by their teachers, counselors, therapists, parents, mentors, and peers, who may assist learners with downloading/installing the game application on personal computing devices. The game is marketed to teachers and treatment providers through educational, therapeutic and treatment organizations. And it’s marketed to parents, mentors, and learners through social media.
  • DistributionLearners are introduced to Stories About the Steps by their teachers, counselors, therapists, parents, mentors, and peers, who may assist learners with downloading/installing the game application on personal computing devices. The game is marketed to teachers and treatment providers through educational, therapeutic and treatment organizations. And it’s marketed to parents, mentors, and learners through social media.
  • DistributionLearners are introduced to Stories About the Steps by their teachers, counselors, therapists, parents, mentors, and peers, who may assist learners with downloading/installing the game application on personal computing devices. The game is marketed to teachers and treatment providers through educational, therapeutic and treatment organizations. And it’s marketed to parents, mentors, and learners through social media.
  • Detailed Game DescriptionCore ideaStories About the Steps is an online game designed to teach youths about 12-step programs for addiction recovery, using a framework of the Five W's (and one H) (Flynt, 2011, May). The game is designed especially for mobile computing devices, such as iPhones and iPads. And it integrates with social media applications, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. The game employs digital badging systems and social learning to support user (learner) engagement. Learners complete series of challenges to earn badges and win the game. Learners meet these challenges independently and/or collaboratively with other users, or “sponsors.” Challenges consist of drill-and-practice, matching, and scavenger-hunt learning activities (Horton, 20XX).
  • Detailed Game DescriptionCore ideaStories About the Steps is an online game designed to teach youths about 12-step programs for addiction recovery, using a framework of the Five W's (and one H) (Flynt, 2011, May). The game is designed especially for mobile computing devices, such as iPhones and iPads. And it integrates with social media applications, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. The game employs digital badging systems and social learning to support user (learner) engagement. Learners complete series of challenges to earn badges and win the game. Learners meet these challenges independently and/or collaboratively with other users, or “sponsors.” Challenges consist of drill-and-practice, matching, and scavenger-hunt learning activities (Horton, 20XX).
  • Detailed Game DescriptionCore ideaStories About the Steps is an online game designed to teach youths about 12-step programs for addiction recovery, using a framework of the Five W's (and one H) (Flynt, 2011, May). The game is designed especially for mobile computing devices, such as iPhones and iPads. And it integrates with social media applications, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. The game employs digital badging systems and social learning to support user (learner) engagement. Learners complete series of challenges to earn badges and win the game. Learners meet these challenges independently and/or collaboratively with other users, or “sponsors.” Challenges consist of drill-and-practice, matching, and scavenger-hunt learning activities (Horton, 20XX).
  • Detailed Game DescriptionCore ideaStories About the Steps is an online game designed to teach youths about 12-step programs for addiction recovery, using a framework of the Five W's (and one H) (Flynt, 2011, May). The game is designed especially for mobile computing devices, such as iPhones and iPads. And it integrates with social media applications, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. The game employs digital badging systems and social learning to support user (learner) engagement. Learners complete series of challenges to earn badges and win the game. Learners meet these challenges independently and/or collaboratively with other users, or “sponsors.” Challenges consist of drill-and-practice, matching, and scavenger-hunt learning activities (Horton, 20XX).
  • Detailed Game DescriptionCore ideaStories About the Steps is an online game designed to teach youths about 12-step programs for addiction recovery, using a framework of the Five W's (and one H) (Flynt, 2011, May). The game is designed especially for mobile computing devices, such as iPhones and iPads. And it integrates with social media applications, such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. The game employs digital badging systems and social learning to support user (learner) engagement. Learners complete series of challenges to earn badges and win the game. Learners meet these challenges independently and/or collaboratively with other users, or “sponsors.” Challenges consist of drill-and-practice, matching, and scavenger-hunt learning activities (Horton, 20XX).
  • Background storyLearners encounter (or are directed to) specific resources that provide narratives about the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of 12-step programs. These narratives are in text, video, and audio formats, supported by graphics, such as in the examples below.
  • Background storyLearners encounter (or are directed to) specific resources that provide narratives about the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of 12-step programs. These narratives are in text, video, and audio formats, supported by graphics, such as in the examples below.
  • Background storyLearners encounter (or are directed to) specific resources that provide narratives about the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of 12-step programs. These narratives are in text, video, and audio formats, supported by graphics, such as in the examples below.
  • Background storyLearners encounter (or are directed to) specific resources that provide narratives about the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of 12-step programs. These narratives are in text, video, and audio formats, supported by graphics, such as in the examples below.
  • Background storyLearners encounter (or are directed to) specific resources that provide narratives about the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of 12-step programs. These narratives are in text, video, and audio formats, supported by graphics, such as in the examples below.
  • The following images contain a sample narrative setup, in text format, for Learning Objective 1, in which “learners will identify truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs:”
  • Here’s a link to a sample narrative setup, in video format, for Learning Objective 1:Who are members of 12-step programs?
  • Here’s a link to another sample narrative setup in video format, for Learning Objective 2, in which “learners will identify contexts/applications of the 12-step program for different addictions:”Find a 12-Step Meeting Near You
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game worldStories About the Steps is designed especially for mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, but it’s also played on notebook and desktop computers. Although the game world is surreal, fantastic, and colorful, its mountainous landscape scenery is nature-inspired. Examples of scenery concepts are depicted by images in the Background Story section above and the images below.
  • Game worldStories About the Steps is designed especially for mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, but it’s also played on notebook and desktop computers. Although the game world is surreal, fantastic, and colorful, its mountainous landscape scenery is nature-inspired. Examples of scenery concepts are depicted by images in the Background Story section above and the images below.
  • Game worldStories About the Steps is designed especially for mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, but it’s also played on notebook and desktop computers. Although the game world is surreal, fantastic, and colorful, its mountainous landscape scenery is nature-inspired. Examples of scenery concepts are depicted by images in the Background Story section above and the images below.
  • The Stories About the Steps interface includes graphics for icons and buttons which are cheerful, endearing, and colorful. Examples of graphic concepts are depicted by the images in the learning objective and activity descriptions above, as well as those below.
  • The Stories About the Steps interface includes graphics for icons and buttons which are cheerful, endearing, and colorful. Examples of graphic concepts are depicted by the images in the learning objective and activity descriptions above, as well as those below.
  • The Stories About the Steps interface includes graphics for icons and buttons which are cheerful, endearing, and colorful. Examples of graphic concepts are depicted by the images in the learning objective and activity descriptions above, as well as those below.
  • Game playLearners choose one of two challenge series, or stories, to pursue: Facts and Misbeliefs or Types of Programs. (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Game playLearners choose one of two challenge series, or stories, to pursue: Facts and Misbeliefs or Types of Programs. (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Game playLearners choose one of two challenge series, or stories, to pursue: Facts and Misbeliefs or Types of Programs. (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Game objectiveLearners meet challenges, or complete learning activities, earning a specific badge for each challenge. Learners earn six different badges in completing a challenge series (“story”), or learning objective, in order to win the game. When learners complete the Facts and Misbeliefs story, they learn truths and misconceptions of 12-step programs. When learners complete the Types of Programs story, they learn applications or contexts of the 12-step program for different addictions (Flynt, 2011).
  • Set-upLearners need high-speed Internet access and mobile, notebook or desktop computers, to play Stories About the Steps which runs on iOS, Android, Windows, and Mac platforms. Once the application is installed on a device, new users (learners) respond to a request by Stories About the Steps to collect non-identifying data about learners’ activities while using the application. Learners may provide or retract authorization of this data collection at any time, via a settings button/screen in the game interface.
  • Set-upLearners need high-speed Internet access and mobile, notebook or desktop computers, to play Stories About the Steps which runs on iOS, Android, Windows, and Mac platforms. Once the application is installed on a device, new users (learners) respond to a request by Stories About the Steps to collect non-identifying data about learners’ activities while using the application. Learners may provide or retract authorization of this data collection at any time, via a settings button/screen in the game interface.
  • Set-upLearners need high-speed Internet access and mobile, notebook or desktop computers, to play Stories About the Steps which runs on iOS, Android, Windows, and Mac platforms. Once the application is installed on a device, new users (learners) respond to a request by Stories About the Steps to collect non-identifying data about learners’ activities while using the application. Learners may provide or retract authorization of this data collection at any time, via a settings button/screen in the game interface.
  • Set-upLearners need high-speed Internet access and mobile, notebook or desktop computers, to play Stories About the Steps which runs on iOS, Android, Windows, and Mac platforms. Once the application is installed on a device, new users (learners) respond to a request by Stories About the Steps to collect non-identifying data about learners’ activities while using the application. Learners may provide or retract authorization of this data collection at any time, via a settings button/screen in the game interface.
  • Set-upLearners need high-speed Internet access and mobile, notebook or desktop computers, to play Stories About the Steps which runs on iOS, Android, Windows, and Mac platforms. Once the application is installed on a device, new users (learners) respond to a request by Stories About the Steps to collect non-identifying data about learners’ activities while using the application. Learners may provide or retract authorization of this data collection at any time, via a settings button/screen in the game interface.
  • Next, learners choose to either integrate social media accounts with the application or use it anonymously. Learners who integrate their social media accounts apply those account identities and network contacts to their Stories About the Steps accounts. These network contacts become potential sponsors or competitors (“peers”) in game play.
  • Next, learners choose to either integrate social media accounts with the application or use it anonymously. Learners who integrate their social media accounts apply those account identities and network contacts to their Stories About the Steps accounts. These network contacts become potential sponsors or competitors (“peers”) in game play.
  • Next, learners choose to either integrate social media accounts with the application or use it anonymously. Learners who integrate their social media accounts apply those account identities and network contacts to their Stories About the Steps accounts. These network contacts become potential sponsors or competitors (“peers”) in game play.
  • Learners who choose to use the application anonymously assume avatars for game play. Examples of avatar concepts are depicted by the images below.
  • Learners who choose to use the application anonymously assume avatars for game play. Examples of avatar concepts are depicted by the images below.
  • Learners who choose to use the application anonymously assume avatars for game play. Examples of avatar concepts are depicted by the images below.
  • Learners who choose to use the application anonymously assume avatars for game play. Examples of avatar concepts are depicted by the images below.

Stories About the Steps game design concept slides Stories About the Steps game design concept slides Presentation Transcript

  • game design  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • Game Overview Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  •  teaches  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • proven method effective tool  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • addiction recovery  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • educational video game Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • online social  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • mobile integrated  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • social learning + digital badging Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • (Mozilla Open Badges, 2011)
  • = engagement  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • (Zynga, Inc., 2012)
  • (Trivie, Inc, 2012-2013)
  • challenges challenges challenges Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  •  learning  objectives Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • = stories  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs truths and misconceptions
  • (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs types of programs
  • (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • (Flynt, 2011, May)
  •  learning  activities Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • = challenges  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs drill-and-practice drill-and-practice drill-and-practice
  • (Images: Flynt, 2011, May)
  • = challenges  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs matching hunting discovering
  • (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs instructional  need 
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs youth learners’ perceptions
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs = factual relational
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs addiction recovery instruction
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs = accessible differentiated
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs social + gamification
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs =  fun
  • Market Analysis Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • audience  profile  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs youths adolescents teenagers
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs = digital natives Millennials (Generation Y, 2013; Homeland Generation, 2013)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs Millennial learners  (Generation Y, 2013)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs self-direction gratification collaboration (Access Technologies Group, 2012)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs digital native learners  (Homeland Generation, 2013)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs customization succinctness accessibility (Cowcill, 2012)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs self-paced rewarding social
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs personalized bite-sized mobile
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs  distribution 
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs stakeholders   
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs social media  
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs Detailed Game Description
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs  core idea 
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs five W’s (and one H)
  • (Images: Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs mobile computing devices
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs social media applications
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs background  story 
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs = narrative setups
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs text video audio
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs + graphics
  • = engagement  Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs
  • (Text: Flynt, 2011, May)
  • (Flynt, 2011, April 21)
  • (Flynt, 2011, July 30)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs  game  objective
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs meet challenges 
  • (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs earn challenge badges
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs complete series 
  • (Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs learn  
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs truths and misconceptions
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs types of programs
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs earn story badges
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs  game world 
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs surreal fantastic colorful
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs =  fun
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs cheerful endearing colorful
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs =  fun
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs  game play 
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs choose story series
  • (Speech bubbles: Flynt, 2011, May)
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs meet challenges 
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs independently with resources
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs meet challenges 
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs collaboratively with sponsors
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs  set-up 
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs  Internet  device  installation
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs device =
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs mobile notebook desktop
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs authorize data collection
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs integration or anonymity
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs social integration =
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs identity + contacts
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs anonymous play =
  • Stories About the Steps The who, what, where, when, why and how of 12-step programs assume game avatar
  • (Iconshock, 2013, March 27)
  • (Hartshorne, 2010, March 1)