Augustus – Constitutional Settlements 3 <ul><li>Lesson Aims: </li></ul><ul><li>1. To describe the additional steps were ta...
Further Change <ul><li>Consulship </li></ul><ul><li>Senate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But why? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>T...
Senate versus the Emperor <ul><li>Draw up a table putting the following into the correct categories. </li></ul>Both appoin...
Ongoing honours <ul><li>Plague and famine in 22 BC and Augustus’ absences from Rome, when he was campaigning in the East f...
Ongoing honours <ul><li>In 18 BC and again in 13 BC, Augustus’ original ten-year grant of proconsular  imperium  was renew...
Auctoritas  (NCEA Study Guide) <ul><li>Augustus may well have ruled without any of the legal titles bestowed upon him, suc...
What does Artus think? <ul><li>Read through p. 51-54 of Artus.  Answer the questions on p. 51 and 52.  </li></ul><ul><li>D...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

L9 Augustus - Constitutional Settlement 3

416 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
416
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

L9 Augustus - Constitutional Settlement 3

  1. 1. Augustus – Constitutional Settlements 3 <ul><li>Lesson Aims: </li></ul><ul><li>1. To describe the additional steps were taken following the settlements. </li></ul><ul><li>2. To explain what consequences these steps had on Augustus’ power. </li></ul><ul><li>Do now: </li></ul><ul><li>Recap on previous lesson </li></ul>
  2. 2. Further Change <ul><li>Consulship </li></ul><ul><li>Senate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But why? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Theory </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Life Magistracy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Army </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Obligation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Grooming </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Equestrian class </li></ul>
  3. 3. Senate versus the Emperor <ul><li>Draw up a table putting the following into the correct categories. </li></ul>Both appointed Governors to their own provinces The senate passed laws. The emperor passed edicts. The senate was the high court of justice in Rome. The emperor could try important cases if he wished. They both had a treasury to draw from.
  4. 4. Ongoing honours <ul><li>Plague and famine in 22 BC and Augustus’ absences from Rome, when he was campaigning in the East from 22 to 19 BC, convinced the people that they needed him as consul again. Augustus repeatedly refused until 19 CB, at which time the people insisted on keeping one of the consulships open for him. On his return to Rome from the East, Augustus agreed to accept not the consulship, but consular imperium , and was given the right to sit between the consuls of the year and have twelve lictors. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Ongoing honours <ul><li>In 18 BC and again in 13 BC, Augustus’ original ten-year grant of proconsular imperium was renewed for another five years, while in 8 BC it was renewed for another ten years. Augustus assumed the consulship in 5 BC and again in 2 BC, primarily to introduce his grandsons (his adopted sons, the sons of his daughter Julia) Gaius and Lucius to public life. </li></ul><ul><li>On the death of Lepidus in 12 BC, Augustus assumed the role of Pontifex Maximus, thus also becoming the official head of the priesthood. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Auctoritas (NCEA Study Guide) <ul><li>Augustus may well have ruled without any of the legal titles bestowed upon him, such was the level of his auctoritas among the Roman people. Auctoritas was not a constitutional power; instead it was acquired through one’s personal prestige and moral authority. Having auctoritas meant that a politician could achieve his aims without having to resort to direct orders or the use of imperium. There was no question that Augustus had a huge amount of personal auctoritas and the longer he was in power, the greater it became, as people became increasingly unfamiliar with the constitution of republican government. This was compounded by the wide-ranging powers Augustus had acquired for himself. </li></ul>
  7. 7. What does Artus think? <ul><li>Read through p. 51-54 of Artus. Answer the questions on p. 51 and 52. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not look at the answers. </li></ul><ul><li>Once you have completed the questions you will be able to mark your work. </li></ul>

×