Outdoor & Environmental Studies Revision and Exam Preparation 01

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Outdoor & Environmental Studies Revision and Exam Preparation 01

  1. 1. Be Prepared.The Outdoor & Environmental Studies Exam Preparation Kit 1. I acknowledge previous work made available by: Andrew Mannion Whitefriars College (and VOEA) amannion@whitefriars.vic.edu.au Created by John Pahlow 1
  2. 2. Assessment Reports for Examinations + Examination Reports Examination specifications and sample examination (PDF - 287KB, March 2012) Created by John Pahlow 2
  3. 3. Some implications from past exams Students struggle 1. Reading what is 1. to fully actually there understand 2. Writing what is what’s being wanted asked 2. to put together coherent responses Created by John Pahlow 3
  4. 4. The 2012 exam? This is the first year of a new study design. There have been changes from the previous study design. Yellow arrows indicate similar KKs in the new design Bold YELLOW text indicates new or substantially changed items Created by John Pahlow 4
  5. 5. What changes have there been? Unit 3 AOS 1Old Study Design Current study design interactions and relationships with the  an overview of Australian outdoor environments before humans, including characteristics of biological Australian environment as expressed by isolation, geological stability, and climatic variations indigenous cultures;  relationships with Australian outdoor environments interactions, perceptions and relationships expressed by specific Indigenous communities  before and after European colonisation with the Australian environment as  relationships with Australian outdoor environments as expressed by: the first non-indigenous influenced by: settlers; those from the Goldrush period to  the first non-Indigenous settlers’ experiences Federation; and those since Federation;  increasing population the role of environmental movements in  industrialisation changing human relationships with  nation building  the foundation and role of environmental movements in Australian environments, in particular since changing relationships with outdoor environments, in the 1970s. relation to at least one of the following:  The Wilderness Society  Australian Conservation Foundation  Victorian National Parks Association  Greenpeace  Gould League. Created by John Pahlow 5
  6. 6. What changes have there been? Unit 3 AOS 2Old Study Design Current study design patterns and types of interaction with natural  contemporary societal relationships with outdoor environments, including conservation practices, environments reflected in different forms of conservation, passive and active recreation, and commerce; recreation, primary industries, and tourism practices the role of technology in mediating human  the factors influencing contemporary societal relationships with outdoor environments, including: relationships with natural environments;  the effects of different technologies the role of commercialisation of outdoor  commercialisation of outdoor environments and experiences in shaping relationships with natural outdoor experiences environments;  portrayals of outdoor environments and outdoor contemporary views of natural environments and experiences in the media, music, art, writing and the ways these are portrayed, for example, in advertising media, behaviour, advertising, music and writing;  social responses to risk taking the role of contemporary views of nature and  social and political discourses about climate outdoor experiences in shaping relationships with change, water management, biosecurity and natural environments; other contemporary environmental issues society’s responses to risk-taking behaviour in the outdoors and the impact on nature. Created by John Pahlow 6
  7. 7. What changes have there been? Unit 4 AOS 1Old Study Design Current study design the contemporary state of environments in  understandings and critiques of sustainability and Australia; sustainable development the importance of healthy natural environments and  indicators of healthy outdoor environments, biodiversity for the future of individual physical including:  quality and adequacy of water, air and soil and emotional wellbeing;  levels of biodiversity, pest and introduced the importance of healthy natural environments and species biodiversity for the future of society and the  the contemporary state of outdoor environments in potential impact on society of significant damage Australia, with reference to common themes used in such as land degradation, loss of biodiversity, State of the Environment reports pollution through human activity and introduced  the importance of healthy outdoor environments for species; individual physical and emotional wellbeing, and for the practical knowledge and skills for safe and future of society sustainable interaction with natural environments.  the potential impact on society and outdoor environments of land degradation, introduced species, climate change, urbanisation and other significant threats. Created by John Pahlow 7
  8. 8. What changes have there been? Unit 4 AOS 2 Old Study Design Current study design conflicts of interest between people involved in  at least two conflicts of interest between people involved in uses of outdoor environments, including at least one from the following: uses of natural environments, such as tourism,  Marine national parks and sanctuaries (Victoria) national parks, public land, farming, conservation  Franklin River campaign (Tasmania) and differing types of outdoor recreation;  Grazing in the Alpine National Park (Victoria) the methods used by individuals and groups to  Desalination plant at Wonthaggi (Victoria)  the methods used by individuals and groups to influence decisions about the use of outdoor influence decisions about the use of natural environments environments;  the decision-making processes followed by land managers and/or governments or their the processes followed by land managers and/or agencies relating to conflicting interests over the use of outdoor environments, including the role of the Victorian Environment Assessment Council (VEAC) governments or their agencies in making  management strategies and policies for achieving and maintaining healthy and sustainable decisions relating to conflicting interests over the outdoor environments that may be adopted by public and private land managers, including use of natural environments; at least one from the following:  Trust for Nature (Victoria) management strategies for achieving and  Australia’s Biodiversity Conservation Strategy 2010–2020 (Australia) maintaining healthy and sustainable  Victoria’s Native Vegetation Management: A framework for action (Victoria) environments that may be adopted by public and  at least two acts or conventions related to the management and sustainability of outdoor private land managers; environments, including at least one from the following:  Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (Vic) current local, state, and national policies related  Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cwlth) to the management and sustainability of natural  Ramsar Convention (international treaty, 1971) environments;  actions undertaken to sustain healthy outdoor environments, including at least two of the following: actions undertaken by individuals and groups in  green building design maintaining healthy and sustainable  integrated farming environments in contemporary Australian society.  urban planning  renewable energy  Landcare. Created by John Pahlow 8
  9. 9. What changes have there been in the study design? The following items are changes, variations or additions to the new study design…. Therefore….  indicators of healthy outdoor environments, including: an overview of Australian outdoor environments before  quality and adequacy of water, air and soil humans, including characteristics of biological isolation, geological stability, and climatic variations  levels of biodiversity, pest and introduced species Influences on relationships  Conflicts  the first non-Indigenous settlers’ experiences  Marine national parks and sanctuaries (Victoria)  increasing population  Franklin River campaign (Tasmania)  industrialisation  Grazing in the Alpine National Park (Victoria)  nation building  Desalination plant at Wonthaggi (Victoria) Environmental groups and the movement..  Management strategies…  The Wilderness Society  Trust for Nature (Victoria)  Australian Conservation Foundation  Australia’s Biodiversity Conservation Strategy 2010–2020 (Australia)  Victorian National Parks Association  Victoria’s Native Vegetation Management: A  Greenpeace framework for action (Victoria)  Gould League.  Legislation social and political discourses about climate change,  Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (Vic) water management, biosecurity and other contemporary environmental issues  Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cwlth) understandings and critiques of sustainability and sustainable development  Ramsar Convention (international treaty, 1971) indicators of healthy outdoor environments, including :  Action quality and adequacy of water, air and soil levels of  green building design biodiversity, pest and introduced species  integrated farming the role of the Victorian Environment Assessment Council  urban planning (VEAC)  renewable energy  Landcare. Created by John Pahlow 9
  10. 10. General Exam Preparation Use SAC tasks as a way of preparing for the exam Read from a variety of sources Practice writing – particularly describing issues and presenting arguments Use past exams and practice/sample exams Created by John Pahlow 10
  11. 11. General Exam Preparation Start with easier questions first (list, describe) then do harder questions (explain, analyse, evaluate) Make use of information in the stimulus material and in other parts of the paper Write legibly, use a pen, and respond to every question Use extra spaces in the exam book if you need to (make sure to note the question you are answering or continuing to answer) Answer the question asked, not some similar question you’ve prepared for When finished, read over your response, checking for missing words and sentences that make sense Don’t repeat the question in your answer, and don’t waffle With longer answers you can use sub-headings Don’t waste time demonstrating irrelevant knowledge Read the question carefully a number of times and make sure to read it again after you have finished your answer Answer in point form Ask for an extra blank script book if you need it, although you may be writing too much Use all the time you’ve got Created by John Pahlow 11
  12. 12. General Exam Activity Make use of reading time to read through questions, read through stimulus material and start planning out your answers Allocate time for each question – use the marking scheme to help you with this (allow time for checking longer answers) Plan your longer answers Identify and highlight keywords Underline key instructions (such as numbers of responses) Created by John Pahlow 12
  13. 13. General Exam Activity Use examples from field trips if asked or if appropriate When giving more than one response or example, try to make them diverse and different Try not to be over-simplistic about issues (like indigenous and non-indigenous impact on the land) Created by John Pahlow 13
  14. 14. Exam terminologyThe following are some of the keywords used in VCE  Discussexams with a common description of the usage of these  Identify the major issues from one or morekeywords. arguments or opinions and show the strengths Analyse and weaknesses of these.  Identify the components in an argument and  Evaluate clarify the relationship between them. Describe  Make a judgment, based on criteria, about an and relate implications of the arguments being issue. Determine the value of an argument proposed. and/ore carefully look at different Assess arguments/opinions and discuss the value of each.  Make a judgement of/about the value, quality, outcomes of an argument or opinion  Explain Compare and contrast  Relate cause and effect. Make the relationships between issues, opinions, events and/or results  Look at or read two or more different arguments, of one or more situations evident and provide opinions or documents and clearly explain the reasons for the causes and effects. main points of each and how they are different and/or similar to each other.  Identify Define  Recognise and name an event, feature, or part from a list or argument or extended narrative.  State meaning and identify essential qualities of terms, words or expressions.  Recommend Describe  Provide reasons in favour of a proposal.  Provide the characteristics and features of a given opinion or argument. Created by John Pahlow 14
  15. 15. Some general advice Top 10 Exam Preparation Tips - JCU Exam Preparation & Strategies - HSC Online Studying & Exam Tips, Study Tips - Victoria - Youth Central VCE Outdoor and Environmental Studies Exam ... - Whitefriars Created by John Pahlow 15

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