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eMarketing Plan for Intel Spain (200) eMarketing Plan for Intel Spain (200) Document Transcript

  • Proposal by: Jesús MarotoEuro RSCG Wnek Gosper Tel: +44 20 7257 9877
  • ContentsINTRODUCTION .........................................................................................................4Intels marketing strategy: brief history .................................................................... 4SITUATION ANALYSIS .............................................................................................5Brand perception ......................................................................................................... 5General consumer trends ............................................................................................ 5The Spanish Internet consumer.................................................................................. 5Intel.es ........................................................................................................................... 6 Performance Indicators .............................................................................................. 6 Target audience profiles............................................................................................. 8 The competition: Transmeta and AMD ..................................................................... 8 SWOT analysis .......................................................................................................... 8 Strengths............................................................................................................. 8 Weaknesses......................................................................................................... 8 Opportunities ..................................................................................................... 8 Threats ............................................................................................................... 8OBJECTIVES ..............................................................................................................9Intel Spain web marketing team mission statement ................................................. 9Intel.es 2002 Objectives ............................................................................................... 9STRATEGY, TACTICS & ACTIONS .......................................................................9A) Increasing traffic levels .......................................................................................... 9 A.1. Put in place measures to drive more traffic to Intel.es ....................................... 9 A.1.1 Optimise local search engine and directory positions.................................. 9 A.1.2. Increase presence in Spanish portals........................................................... 9 A.1.3. Viral marketing ........................................................................................... 9 A.1.3.1 Intel philanthropic peer-to-peer program............................................ 10 A.1.3.2. The Intel jingle ring tone .................................................................... 10 A.1.4. Distribute tools and content to 3rd party sites to target qualified consumers and potential visitors. ........................................................................................... 10B) Optimising and improving content offer ............................................................ 10 B.1. Share content between Intel.es and Intel.com/espanol and use the savings to localise more content. .............................................................................................. 10 B.1.1. Process....................................................................................................... 11 B.2. Associate Intel with great digital media experience......................................... 11 B.2.1 Gaming ....................................................................................................... 11 B.2.1.2. Sponsorships....................................................................................... 11Jesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 2
  • B.2.1.2. Partnerships ........................................................................................ 11 B.2.2 Streaming media......................................................................................... 11C) Improving usability and developing an accessibility initiative ......................... 12 C.1. Comply with consumer trends through usability initiatives............................. 12 C.1.1. Unclutter the home page ............................................................................ 12 C.1.2. Increase font size ....................................................................................... 12 C.2. Increase brand awareness by developing an accessible site............................. 12 C.2.1 Create a text only version of Intel.es .......................................................... 12STRATEGY, TACTICS & ACTIONS: VISUAL SUMMARY ..............................12FINANCIAL PLANNING AND CONTROL MECHANISMS...............................13REFERENCES ..........................................................................................................14Jesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 3
  • IntroductionIntels marketing strategy: brief historyIn 1989 Intel researched the marketplace and realised there was a considerable amount ofconfusion about the benefits of technology to the consumer. In October that year, newspapersacross the world ran Intel’s first ever advertising campaign, Red X. It was as a consequenceof this advertising campaign that Intel began to realise that it had moved into an unusual no-mans -land between the industrial and consumer markets. On the one hand, itsmicroprocessors were largely sold to computer companies. On the other, the p roduct hadbecome such an important part of the PC, such a key determinant of the computers price andperformance, that consumers were beginning to make buying decisions based on what kindof processor was inside the machine. The Red X campaign was Intels first attempt to escapefrom slavery at the hands of the PC manufacturers. Instead of turning out new processors andjust hoping that computer companies would build them into systems, the company would nowtake the initiative. It would go direct to the consumer with its pitch for a new processor. If thepitch was convincing, the consumer would go down to the local computer store, and demanda machine containing the new processor – and this pressure would force PC makers to startdesigning systems incorporating Intels new chip.The idea worked. By the 1990s end-users were making purchasing decisions inside computersuperstores or over the telephone to direct-mail PC makers like Dell. They now had someinfluence on the process. Intel needed to find a way of getting its message through toconsumers via TV ads. Thus in May 1991 the Intel inside campaign was born. The companybegan to spend heavily on a world-wide advertising campaign, telling consumers that buyinga computer with an Intel chip inside would guarantee advanced technology and compatibilitywith the range of software written for the Intel x86 processor family. The paradox behind thecampaign was that it was pushing a range of products that almost no consumers wereexpected to buy themselves. Instead, the focus was entirely on putting customers in a frameof mind so that when they were next buying a computer, it would be the Intel name, and theIntel inside logo, that would provoke the spark of recognition and relief that often precedes abuying decision.Intel also launched a partnership marketing campaign, in which it shared the cost of computercompanies own ads if they included the Intel inside logo in the ad copy with appropriateprominence. After some initial hesitation, manufacturers signed up for the programme in theirhundreds. By 1994 almost the entire PC industry had joined in. Intels world-wide sales rose63% in 1992, the first full year of the campaign, and its brand came to be listed by marketinganalysts as the third most valuable name on earth after Coca-Cola and Marlboro. Thecampaign had the effect of making the Intel name almost ubiquitous – and the Intel insidelogo so attractive that some PC makers wanted to include it in their ads even without anycontribution from Intel. I his speech at Intels 1993 annual meeting, CEO Andy Grove was nable to boast that the companys brand preference – the percentage of people who said theypreferred to buy computers with Intel processors – had risen from 60% to nearly 80% in thecourse of the previous year. The result was that to get PC makers to buy their parts, Intelscompetitors would now have to price their processors cheaper, and offer better performance.More recently, in August 2001, Intel ranked 6th in BusinessWeek’s ranking of the world mostvaluable brands. However, current slumping PC sales and price wars make it a struggle tostay there.With regards to the web, Intel has always had a web presence. Notwithstanding, it was notuntil 1997 that Intel.es appeared. In 1999 the Intel WebOutfitter strategy (convincingconsumers to buy a PC with a Pentium III so that they could access an exclusive web site)added a lot of cutting edge content to the Intel.es site. Although this section was closed downin 2001, some of the content and ideas migrated to the Home Computing section.Jesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 4
  • Situation analysisBrand perceptionAccording to recent research carried out across Western Europe by Euro RSCG MVBMS(New York), the Intel brand has a huge equity and no negative baggage.In terms of technology, Intel is widely perceived and acknowledged as a leader but in thecontext of the Internet, Intel is not viewed as an Internet leader. Consumers identifycompanies such as Cisco, AOL, Yahoo!, Microsoft and IBM as leaders in that arena. It seemsthat to command attention Intel must surprise people out of their current state ofcomplacency. A proposition that seems close to customers expectations is that “Intel is theaccelerator of the Internet Age”. Intel’s role as accelerator/enabler is consistent with corebrand equities and the historical context makes Internet Age more exciting to be a part of,more aspirational. Also, the Internet would be the medium and the Internet Age would be “theculture” of our time. In this scenario Intel’s heritage and credibility would be the major asseton top of which a journey through the Internet age can be built. Trust is critical at this stagebut at the same time, the aspirational aspects are what make the proposition interesting.As a consequence, the main general idea Euro RSCG has been working on consists onmoving Intel from being the “Brains inside the PC” to make consumers identify Intel as the“Accelerator of the Internet Age”.General consumer trendsLast year the advertising group BMP DDB started researching “The Millennial Consumer”.This project intends to identify consumer trends for the next 10 years.Some of the results obtained so far portrait a more individualistic consumer looking for morethan simple good products. Social status seems to have shifted from being based on materialwealth to be based on an interior quality of life. This might be due to the fact that in the 1990sthere has been a real increase in households’ disposable income all across Western Europe(Downing et al, 2001), and therefore material goods are no longer such a differentiatingelement as they used to be. Overall, the BMP DDB study explains that the shift in values isresulting in 3 manageable consumer trends: “Make me feel something”, “Respect me as anindividual” and “Make the most of my valuable time”.Some implications of “Make me feel something”:Since the focus is no longer the product function but the in-use experience, the advertiserneeds to move away from explaining what a product does to how it feels. The challenge iscreating a brand experience at every touchpoint. Bring a sense of adventure and the promiseof uncharted territory. Creativity and spirituality are big. Therefore advertisers should considerspiritual cues: simplicity, Eastern; as well as charity associations. Consider millennial brandvalues: from power, sexy, successful, high-achiever to spiritual, creative, friendly, risk-taking,and soul-searching.Some implications of “Respect me as an individual":The consumer wants to be seen as an individual. He wants to express himself, be able tocustomise his experiences, wants to be listened and expects to be empowered.Some implications of “Make the most of my valuable time”:Increasing affluence, increasing knowledge, more choices, increasing pace of life is leading tomore stress. Consumers are looking for more sophisticated ways of managing that stress.The consumer wants to be relaxed and entertained. He doesnt want to do the boring stuff(cleaning, etc.) and expects total solutions.The Spanish Internet consumerAccording to an Internet audience study carried out during the first quarter of 2002 by theSpanish media surveyor Estudio General de Medios (EGM), 22.2% of Spaniards (almost 8million people) access the Internet on a regular basis. Most people access it from home andtheir main activity is surfing the net. According to the Internet monitoring company Netvalue,online gaming sites are more popular in Spain than other European countries. Sites that offeronline games and provide information on games are visited by 22.5 percent of Spain’s onlineJesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 5
  • population. Netvalue indicates that the popularity of gaming sites in Spain is because of theyouth of the Spanish Internet audience (younger than in other European countries). In fact,according to the EGM study, 70% of those accessing the Internet in Spain are under 34 and61% are male. A study by Europemedia mentions that the typical Spanish on-line consumer isurban-dwelling, well educated although barely understands English and has been on-line forover 2 years. His average monthly salary is between €1,200 and €2,400. The most popularB2C purchases are books, music, electronic items, and travel-related services. Anotherinteresting aspect is that the Catalan and Basque regions have the highest quotas of Internetpenetration.One in five Internet users in Spain used "streaming media" from home in January, accordingto Netvalue. This makes the Spanish the keenest home users of streaming media in theEuropean countries included in the study (Denmark, the UK, France and Germany) andkeener than US users. Spain also has the highest percentage of young media streamingusers, with 39 percent of users aged 24 or under. Real.com and Terra.es are the preferredsites for this service.In terms of media, newspaper and magazine sales are declining. However, Internet audiencehas increased dramatically in the past year (EGM).According to a survey carried out by the AIMC (Spanish Association for Media Research), themost visited sites are:1 www.terra.es 6 www.hotmail.passport.com 11 www.navegalia.com2 www.yahoo.es 7 www.ya.com 12 www.altavista.com3 www.google.com 8 www.mixmail.com 13 www.invertia.com4 www.recoletos.es 9 www.msn.es 14 www.elmundo.es5 www.elpais.es 10 www.eresmas.com 15 www.lycos.esAlso according to AIMC, broadband Internet access is becoming popular in Spain. However77% percent of home Internet users in Spain still have dial-up access, but 8.8% have cablemodem access, 6.8% have ADSL, and 6.2% have an ISDN connection. Just fewer than 7% ofSpanish Internet users go online with a WAP phone, and 1.7% use a PDA, while 1.7% useinteractive TV. However, 98.5% still go online with a PC.Intel.esIntel.es is part of Intel.com and was set up to target Spanish users. Even though manysections are localised into Spanish, there are still many others only available in English.However, some of those sections are localised in the Latin-American version and not in theSpanish one. This is because there are two different marketing teams involved, LATAM andEMEA. I believe both sites should share content. This could bring excellent savings.The Spanish site tries to explain the benefits of technology to the consumer. Therefore thelocalised sections are: - Home Computing (Informática doméstica): with examples about the advantages of using the latest processors, processor information, optimised software available and any other consumer-focused interesting news. - Products: detailed technical information as well as information about tools. - Support (Asistencia): for distributors, consumers, retailers, etc… - Businesses (Empresas): business solutions. - Resellers and providers area (part of the Partnership program previously mentioned). - Company information (datos de la empresa): Press releases… - Intel in Spain: information and events (seminars, etc…) - Contact information.Performance IndicatorsIntel.es has been using Webtrends since January this year. In this period of time the site hasconsistently received around 27 thousand unique visitors per month and an average of 900per day. The average length of the visit is over 7 minutes and the most visited pages are:Jesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 6
  • Pages Unique visitors Time spent1. Bienvenido a Intel España (Welcome to Intel Spain) 13,084 00:01:22 http://www.intel.es/es/ 2. Bienvenido a Intel España (Welcome to Intel Spain) 2,227 00:01:25 http://www.intel.com/es/ 3. Procesador Intel(R) Pentium(R) III (Processor Info) 2,179 00:03:04 http://www.intel.com/es/PentiumIII/ 4. Productos (Product information pages) 2,014 00:01:09 http://www.intel.es/es/products/ 5. Procesadores, productos y tecnología Intel (Home computing 1,873 00:00:58 section) http://www.intel.es/es/home/ 6. Informática doméstica: Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 (Pentium 4 1,568 00:01:46 information for users) http://www.intel.es/es/home/pentium4/ 7. Productos - Buscar por Placas madre (Information about 1,497 00:02:44 motherboards) http://www.intel.es/es/products/browse/motherbd.htm 8. Informática doméstica: Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 (Pentium 4 1,478 00:02:45 technical details) http://www.intel.es/es/home/pentium4/tech_info.htm 9. Productos - Buscar por Procesadores (Processor search) 1,359 00:01:16 http://www.intel.es/es/products/browse/processor.htm 10. Productos (General products) 1,128 00:01:05 http://www.intel.es/es/products/ 11. Centros de asistencia Intel (Support) 1,047 00:05:21 http://www.intel.es/es/intel/nav/support.htmThe most visited content group is Intel Home Computing. In terms of hits and visitors overtime, most users visit the site Monday to Friday between 11am and 6pm (according to thetime frames, presumably from work). 50% of those are repeated visitors. It is interesting toadd that even though the site caters Spanish users, only 50% come from Spain: Countries Visits % 1. Spain (ES) 13575 49.87 2. Mexico (MX) 2575 9.46 3. EU 2531 9.30 4. United States (US) 1377 5.06 5. Peru (PE) 1179 4.33 6. Colombia (CO) 1049 3.85 7. Argentina (AR) 965 3.55 8. Chile (CL) 819 3.01 9. Venezuela (VE) 602 2.21 10. United Kingdom (GB) 334 1.23The main cities the users access from are Barcelona (12%), Mexico D.F. (11%), Madrid (9%),Lima (6.5%), Santiago de Chile (4.83%) and Bogotá (4.38%) (Note: this mainly indicates thatthe servers of the ISPs are located in the above cities, although I presumer users are locatednearby). These data suggests that Intel might be better off combining sections of Intel.es andIntel.com/espanol.Top Referring Sites by Visits Site Visits % 1. No Referrer 15,322 55.67% 2. http://www.google.com/ 3,564 12.95% 3. http://www.intel.com/ 1,956 7.11% 4. http://search.intel.com/ 1,144 4.16% 5. http://www.intel.es/ 615 2.23% 6. http://search.msn.es/ 310 1.13% 7. http://www.pchardware.org/ 308 1.12% 8. http://mx.google.yahoo.com/ 265 0.96% 9. http://www.helpdrivers.com/ 262 0.95% 10. http://www.nicepc.es/ 228 0.83%Jesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 7
  • The previous data seem to suggest that most users either guess or already know the URL(No referrer field). In terms of browsers used, Internet Explorer is the absolute winner.The top search keywords are: Intel, Pentium, Procesador, Procesadores and Xeon.Finally, the operating systems most used by visitors are Windows 98 (44%), 2000 (30%), ME(14%), 95 and NT.Target audience profilesNovices (26%) Mainstream (43%) Tech Involved (31%) •Desire to own a PC •Includes current PC Owners/ •Interested in technology for •No/little PC experience Users technology sake st •Low brand awareness •1 time buyer who already uses a •High usage model involvement •Little/no understanding of PC •Heavy PC usage processor relevance •Basic experience w/usage models •Intel loyalists and fence sitters •Learning is important usage model •PC enhances their life •Some influence over other •Internet is key purchase drive •Brand plays a role in their segments •Price sensitive purchase decision •Predominately male •Families/young adults/single •Moderately aware of technology professional •High end mainstream has influence over others •Families/young adults/single professionalThe competition: Transmeta and AMDTransmeta has a very small web presence only available in English.AMD has done considerable efforts in the past years and has recently unveiled a multilingualweb site that slowly tries to mimic Intel’s content. It is very small in comparison with Intel’s anddoesn’t offer customer focused sections such as Intel’s Home Computing. The localisation isvery poor and there are lots of translation errors, plenty of sections only available in English,non-working links, etc… Most technical information is only in English (even though it doesn’twarn the visitor). AMD also has a site for Spain and another for Latin America, in line withIntel. Finally, AMD also has a section for resellers and distributors.SWOT analysisStrengths Weaknesses- Large but not enough numbers of visitors (more - Site difficult to navigate.could be achieved with the same investment). - No traffic generating strategy (no promotions,- Many users registered to newsletter and very low users get to the site by guessing address or doingchurn rate (less than 5%). searches).- Good content. - Too much English content.- Good customer care (whether they are final - Pages too cluttered sometimes.consumers, providers or retailers). - Not enough local information.- Known URL. - Site not accessible for impaired users (no text- Traffic from all over the world. version).- Partnership marketing campaign. - Most people access site from work.Opportunities Threats- Sharing content between the Latin American and - AMD’s site is not much of a threat at this stagethe Spanish sites. but this situation could change in the future.- Add more consumer content or create - The European cookie directive is no longer goingpartnerships with MP3 or streaming media to be an issue, but the email directive might be.providers. - The European directive on Accessibility.- Develop an accessible or text only site. - Latin-American traffic.- ITV or WAP. - Users do not understand English. Increase- Gaming is huge in Spain, target gamers. localised sections.- Develop some presence in Catalan. - Consumer trends previously described.Jesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 8
  • ObjectivesIntel Spain web marketing team mission statement"Provide a world class, local web site to deliver an engaging brand experience to Spanishconsumer and business audiences and thereby positively influence purchase decisions forIntel products".Intel.es 2002 Objectives1. Sell-up processors & cross-sell related products and services by target audience.2. Increase brand loyalty and solidify Intel‘s technology leadership position.3. Generate excitement and create demand for Intel products and technology.Strategy, Tactics & ActionsIntel.es is a successful web site that currently fulfils the objectives above. However, in thelight of the situation analysis carried out, I believe there is plenty of room for improvement.The strategy I propose is based on increasing traffic levels, optimising and improving thecontent offer, improving usability and developing an accessibility initiative.A) Increasing traffic levelsNone of the objectives will be fully accomplished if Intel.es doesnt receive more visits. Thecurrent traffic volume is too low in consideration with the money Intel invests in maintainingthe site, especially if we take into consideration that the figures collected indicate that at least50% of the traffic is from other countries. Ideally I would recommend increasing current trafficlevels by at least 10% within 6 months.Intel is currently investing heavily on the web site. However, Intel is not investing any moneyonline into driving users to the site. Users currently go to the web site either because theyguess the URL or because they remember it after having seen it in a TV commercial, pressad or direct marketing piece. There are online campaigns but they are product specific.A.1. Put in place measures to drive more traffic to Intel.esAccording to the target audience profiles, we are most interested in increasing traffic fromMainstream and Tech involved consumers, since these two groups will eventually influenceothers. We want to be very cost effective and mainly achieve referrals from online sources,PR or word of mouth.Therefore I believe that the following specific traffic building measures, combined with theimplementation of the above strategy would achieve the desired results.A.1.1 Optimise local search engine and directory positionsIntel.es receives visitors from Google.com but among the most visited sites in Spain there aremany other local search engines (those in Terra.es, Yahoo.es, Ya.es...). Since Intel alsowants to receive traffic from those, I would recommend a paid for inclusion approach but atthe same time not forgetting to optimise the site meta-tags using Spanish meta-tags.A.1.2. Increase presence in Spanish portalsThe computer and multimedia sections of successful Spanish portals could be a great placefrom where to target Mainstream users. Since this group looks more for value for money and rdtherefore uses the web for information gathering, positive 3 party reviews linking to Intel.es,branding a particular section that explores usage models and offering links to the store locatorsection in Intel.es in order to enable the purchase could work quite well.A.1.3. Viral marketingA viral marketing campaign is a very cost-effective way of reaching large numbers of peoplerapidly. As seen in consumer trends, consumers want to make the most of their time but alsofeel good.Jesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 9
  • A.1.3.1 Intel philanthropic peer-to-peer programIntel in the USA developed a couple of years ago the Intel philanthropic peer-to-peer program(www.intel.com/cure). This program helps combat life-threatening illnesses by linking millionsof PCs. This virtual super computer uses P2P technology to make good use of the PC´sunused resources. In order to take part, the user only has to download a screensaver and beconnected to the Internet.I believe a great way of increasing traffic would be offering a localised version of thescreensaver and the microsite. Intel could bring on board the Spanish Cancer association andget them to offer a link to Intel.es from their site. Intel would easily benefit from PR and wordof mouth. In any case, to start driving traffic to the microsite, Intel could mention the programand offer a link in the Home Computing newsletter.A.1.3.2. The Intel jingle ring toneAnother great viral marketing idea w ould be to add a section within Home Computing fromwhere visitors can download the Intel jingle for their mobile phones. Mobile phone penetrationin Spain is one of the highest in Europe and Spain has the youngest Internet audience,therefore this viral marketing idea could be a success. To start the word of mouth, Intel couldoffer a link in the Home Computing newsletter.There are two issues with this proposal that should be clarified before going ahead anyway,are there any legal issues with using the jingle for this purpose? And, will Spanish consumersidentify the jingle with Intel? Some qualitative research in this area would be useful.A.1.4. Distribute tools and content to 3rd party sites to target qualifiedconsumers and potential visitors.Engage with external sites (PC OEMS such as Investrónica, tech involved-targeted sites likewww.idg.es/pcworld) to share Home Computing tools (PC Builder’s Guide, MotherboardSelector, etc.) and content in an effort to better reach tech involved consumers and bringthem to Intel.es. Distributed content may appear in the form of advertising or be incorporatedinto the partner site content offering. This could be the first step into developing partnerships.B) Optimising and improving content offerB.1. Share content between Intel.es and Intel.com/espanol and use the savingsto localise more content.Latin America and Spain speak the same language. While there are some minorterminological issues, there is no linguistic reason why Intel could not share content betweenthe two Spanish sites. The main reason why there are two sites is because there are twomarketing geographies, LATAM and EMEA. I believe Intel should have the same approach asOracle and target users by the language they speak instead of by where they live. Moreover,this approach could greatly benefit the fast growing Hispanic minority within the USA, whichfeels more comfortable with Spanish rather than English as their first language. This is amuch more cost efficient practice. At the same time, if Intel shared more content, Intel couldafford to localise more content into Spanish since, as explained in the situation analysis,Spanish speakers barely speak English.Marketing issues such as product availability or local legislation could easily be solved byadding notes (i.e. only available in Mexico and Spain, etc.). In any case, this approachwouldnt kill the local flavour. Each country would have a section (currently Intel.es has "Intelin Spain" with information about local seminars, contacts, etc.) as well as its own URL. In fact,real local content should be increased (more local partnerships, information about Intelactivities in the country, etc.), as thats one of the current weaknesses. The important issuewould be that all countries would share some of the content (IeBC, Home Computing,processor information, etc.).At the moment, Intel.es would greatly benefit from linking to the IeBC Spanish content hostedin Latinamerica. The user could click on a link to go to IeBC Spanish and then a pop up couldwarn the user that he is going to see Latinamerican content, in that way we would avoid anyissues.Jesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 10
  • B.1.1. Process a) LATAM and EMEA teams approve idea and agree on staffing a team. b) Once the team is formed, the members will analyse site maps and agree on what content is going to be shared. c) At this point, the Spanish web team will inform each geography. d) Each geography will then keep working on the rest of the sections as usual.B.2. Associate Intel with great digital media experience.Intel wants to explain the benefits of technology to the consumer to increase demand for theirproducts and technology. At the same time, Intel wants to be seen as the accelerator of theInternet age. On the other hand, consumers want to experience. Since gaming and streamingmedia are huge in Spain (mainly because the online population is very young), and those twoactivities fulfil all the above, Intel should improve content, create partnerships, sponsor sitesthat offer games, music or short movies, or even create a internet radio. Intel should also nmake the most of the fact that the Xbox has an Intel processor (even though it is not latestprocessor, at least is Intel and not AMD). This content approach is very scalable. Intel couldeasily target novices (make them understand through game performance the relevance of theprocessor), mainstream users (show them the need to upgrade in order to further enjoystreaming media) and tech involved (create a forum using streaming media for live chats withIntel experts).B.2.1 GamingB.2.1.2. SponsorshipsThe portals Terra, Ya, Eresmas and Navegalia have excellent gaming sections that Intelcould sponsor.B.2.1.2. PartnershipsIntel could also partner with game developers and create a section within Home Computingwhere visitors can read reviews or download demos of the latest PC games optimised for Intelprocessor based PCs. (Note: Intel could always select the games they want to add, i.e. nonviolent games and only optimised for PC).B.2.2 Streaming mediaB.2.2.1. Short moviesPlus.es has a very successful section where visitors can watch short movies or even submitthem to be reviewed. Intel should sponsor it.B.2.2.2. MusicVitaminic.es offers new bands the possibility of uploading their own music. Visitors can thenvote for the songs they like after either listening to them while online or after downloadingthem. This site is very popular and is completely legal because there are only unsignedbands. Intel should sponsor it as well.Intel should also start considering sponsoring next year’s Eurovision song contest (to behosted in Latvia) web site. This could be a distinctly EMEA marketing opportunity and thestreaming opportunities are great. Spain will be massively following the Festival, but allEastern Europe w too. Since Eastern Europe is a prioritary area for Intel, this could be an illexcellent opportunity.B.2.2.3. Internet radioThere are many radio stations in Spain that also broadcast over the Internet. Intel wouldbenefit from sponsoring the online version of Los 40 (great for our target audiences).Alternatively, Intel could create a site using the URL www.Intel.fm. At this address Intel wouldoffer visitors a list of radio stations as well as some reviews of them. Personally I think thisidea should be considered in the long term since the potential of "Intel.fm" is not limited to theSpanish audience.Jesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 11
  • B.2.2.4. Online forum with Intel expertsIntel should offer monthly live chats with Intel experts. Users could interact at the end bycalling a number. These chats could then be stored in a specifically designed page within theDevelopers (Desarrolladores) section.C) Improving usability and developing an accessibility initiativeC.1. Comply with consumer trends through usability initiativesUsers want to make the most out of their valuable time (see Consumer trends) and in theweb, usability is the key to success. Intel is currently working on increasing the usability of allits sites and should also look into testing usability on a language and culture basis (usabilitypatters are very different from one country to another). However, while the outcome of thisresearch starts to take shape, there are some minor fixes that need to be done immediatelyand that could help make Intel.es more usable.C.1.1. Unclutter the home pageThere is too much information on the home page at moment and the user gets lost.C.1.2. Increase font sizeEven though the user can do it manually, the normal font is too small and seems to scare theuser who easily gets tired and abandons the site.C.2. Increase brand awareness by developing an accessible site.Another aspect to consider is accessibility, making sure a site is not only usable but alsoaccessible by everyone. The European Union accessibility directive and local non-discrimination regulations are forcing companies to make sure their internet sites areaccessible by everyone, including people with disabilities or people accessing the site throughother devices such as iTV, PDAs or Wap phones. While the latest are not an issue (asmentioned before, 98% of Spanish users access the web from a PC), the first one could be.Visually impaired users are one of the largest groups of people with disabilities suffering thecurrent lack of accessible web sites even though they account for more than 5% of allWestern Europe web surfers (source: RNIB). Making Intel.es a fully accessible web site wouldbe difficult and expensive. However, Intel could offer an inexpensive text only version of theircurrent site that would be well accepted. This minor investment would help drive more trafficto Intel.es, help Intel comply with the law and provide great PR in 2003, UE year of peoplewith disabilities. This approach would therefore increase brand awareness and increaseconsumers respect for Intel.C.2.1 Create a text only version of Intel.esSince the site is well structured and there is a content management system in place, it wouldonly be a matter of designing templates to hold the content. Once the regular site getsupdated, the content in the text only version would update automatically.Strategy, Tactics & Actions: Visual summary Strategy Tactics Actions Increase traffic Optimise search engine and directory positions Increase presence in Spanish portals Viral marketing Screensaver Jingle Distribute tools and content to 3rd party sitesJesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 12
  • Optimise and improve content offer Share content between Intel.es and Intel.com/espanol Digital media experience Gaming Sponsorships Partnerships Streaming media Short movies Music Internet radio Online forum Improve usability and accessibility Minor usability fixes Tidy up home page Increase font size Create accessible site Text only version of Intel.esFinancial planning and control mechanisms.All the production, localisation and maintenance of Intel.es is currently outsourced to EuroRSCG. Intel is paying Euro RSCG on a retainer basis.I believe the current retainer levels would not be sufficient to cover the production side of theactivities proposed therefore Intel would have to consider budgeting for the activitiesindicated.In terms of the sponsorships and partnerships, Intel already has extensive experience andconnections. Euro RSCG Wnek Gosper could also certainly help.Since return on investment is Intel’s number one priority, measurement procedures play animportant role. All activities proposed are measurable. Intel is currently using Webtrends andthis valuable tool will be able to let us know whether or not the plan proposed is generatingmore traffic or not. Traffic will also indicate us the levels of excitement and of online brandawareness. Finally, monthly year-to-year sales figures will indicate how Intel is doing in termsof sales.In terms of contingency, Intel can at any given time monitor the performance of any of theactivities. If the activity is not performing as expected, it should be either fine tuned (ifpossible) or cancelled so that money can be allocated to other activities.Jesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 13
  • ReferencesAIMC (2001). ‘Resultados de la 4 encuesta AIMC a usuarios de Internet’.www.aimc.es/aimc/html/inter/net.htmlAIMC (2002). ‘Información sobre la evolución de la audiencia de Internet en el estudiogeneral de medios (EGM). Febrero-Marzo 1996/Febrero-Marzo 2002.’www.aimc.es/aimc/html/inter/net.htmlBMP DDB (2001). ‘The Millenial Consumer’.www.bmpddb.com/ thBusinessWeek (2001). ‘The Best Global Brands’. 6 August. Pages 50-64.Downing, Alice; Nanayakkara, Naomi. (2001). ‘Planning for Consumer Change’. London: TheHenley Centre. http://www.henleycentre.com/Economist.com (Continuously updated). ‘Country briefings: Spain’.www.economist.com/countries/Spain/Europemedia.net (Continuously updated).www.europemedia.net/newsbycountry.asp?CountryID=33Euro RSCG World-wide. (2002). ‘Intel: Creativity in all its forms’www.eurorscg.com/h/s/ow_cs_1.aspINE, Spanish National Statistics Institute. (Continuously updated).http://www.ine.es/welcoing.htmJackson, Tim (1998). Inside Intel. London: Harper Collins.Netvalue (2001). ‘One in seven Britons online uses streaming media’.www.netvalue.com/corp/presse/index_frame.htm?fichier=cp0024.htmNew Media Monitor from the European Travel Commission. (Continuously updated). ‘Marketsby country: Spain’.http://etcmonitor.initiative.net/scripts/marketspg2.asp?country=esp&countryname=SpainRNIB. www.rnib.org.uk/digital/siraccess/Webtrends. www.webtrends.comJesús Maroto CONFIDENTIAL 14