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The library without walls<br />Students effectively <br />obtaining, organising and sharing <br />information from the Wor...
How much information is being generated on the Internet?<br />Who is organising this information?<br />What does this mean...
P<br />M<br />I<br />
3 Questions<br />In what ways do you think using these digital tools in the ways described will prepare students for their...
Original image cc licensed ( BY SD ) flickr photo by Dawn Endico: http://flickr.com/photos/candiedwomanire/1651870/<br />c...
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The library without walls

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Students effectively obtaining, organising and sharing information from the World Wide Web.
This presentation looks at strategies and tools schools can apply to support students in getting information from the Internet, using it effectively, and becoming good digital citizens.

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  • This presentation will discuss ways in which we can ensure our students are not just effectively using the Internet to obtain information for their learning, but being good digital citizens as they do so. Many of the slides in this presentation contain images which are links to the website they are representing. Just click on these if you would like more information.
  • Introduction(Staff room presentation: Show Infosavvy video, Infowhelm and information fluency – picture hyperlinked)The YouTube video by Infosavvy (2010) gives us an idea of the scale that we are dealing with when it comes to information on the Internet. When this video was created, its creators proposed that there was enough information on the internet to fill 13 stacks of books from Earth to Pluto – and the video made it clear that this information is increasing at an exponential rate. Though there are varying estimations of the amount of information on the Internet, it is clear that this amount is phenomenal, and has the potential to be unmanageable if you do not have the skills to find what you need. (Staff room presentation: Show Wesch video, The machine is us/ing us (final version) – picture hyperlinked)Wesch (2007) asks the question, “who will organize all of this data?” He then goes on to tell us that “we will”. As information is uploaded, found, read, shared, liked, favourited, linked, and grouped, it is organised. We are organising information on the Web when we use it, and our students are as well.So what does this mean for our students? Though children today are more confident using technology, we must not let this convince us that they are naturally more capable of finding the information they need (Pfoeffer, 2002). If they are not naturally capable, what can we do to help them to get the information they need without them getting lost and confused? How can we help them to organise the information they find in a way that not only helps them, but helps others as well, and ensures that they are contributing as digital citizens? ________________References:Infosavvy. (2010, June 10). Infowhelm and information fluency [Video file]. Retrieved fromhttp://www.youtube.com/user/infosavvy#p/a/u/0/7ECAVxbfsfc Pfoeffer, P. (2002). Web usability and children: current research and implications for information professionals. In Orana 38(2), 11-13. Wesch, M. (2007, March 8). The machine is us/ing us [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/user/mwesch#p/u/12/NLlGopyXT_g
  • Summary of presentation contentsA search given direction: Digital pathfindersThis presentation will explain what a digital pathfinder is, how they can help students in their search for information, and the things to watch out for when creating and using them. Independent searching: Boolean language and search enginesFollowing on from digital pathfinders, the importance of students’ ability to conduct their own searches for information will be discussed. We will look at boolean language, and the impact its use can have on a students’ search for information. A range of search engines will be discussed – but more importantly, the fact that there is a range, and that different search engines can be used for different purposes. Is it always the best idea to turn straight to Google?Compiling and sharing information: Web 2.0 toolsThirdly we will briefly look at some useful Web 2.0 tools that can be used to compile information, and to share it with others. We will look at the skills students will gain using these tools, and how their learning will be supported. Becoming effective digital citizens – unlocking a world of information.These three overall elements discussed (pathfinders, search engines and Web 2.0 tools) will be tied together to form the bigger picture of a student who is able to obtain, organise and share information using the Internet. The ways that these skills contribute to their digital citizenship will be clarified.
  • Digital PathfindersA digital pathfinder is a collection of resources and advice designed to scaffold students as they complete research in a specific area or topic, perhaps when completing an integrated unit (Midolo, 2002). It is a good starting point for students before they venture onto the world wide web in search of their own resources, and a good place for them to come back to if they need support, encouragement or ideas throughout the research process. It generally includes reference texts, print resources and digital resources – things the students can access in their classroom or the library, as well as on the Internet. It can include advice on research strategies, citing resources, keywords or effective search terms, and can have learning opportunities spread throughout, for example the question on the bottom section of this slide asking students whether a site is reliable. Digital pathfinders are generally created by the teacher librarian (TL) in conjunction with classroom teachers to support a unit of work. In some cases the resources can be added to as the research progresses, by the TL, the classroom teachers or the students – this is easy to do if the digital pathfinder is created as a Wiki.________________References:Midolo, J. (2002). A pathfinder to develop pathfinders. http://www.det.wa.edu.au/education/cmis/eval/downloads/curriculum/pdevelop.pdf retrieved from http://www.det.wa.edu.au/education/cmis/eval/curriculum/pathfinders/path2.htm (need to find out if I can get it from new website resource collection as this one is being decommissioned. Sample pathfinder is the author’s own, and can be found at http://jthomaspathfinder.pbworks.com/w/page/30500674/Bushrangers%20-%20Home
  • Digital pathfinders continuedIt is important to also be aware of the potential pitfalls of a digital pathfinder: There is the possibility that students will rely on it too much, and avoid conducting their own searches for information. Students will need to be reminded that the pathfinder is just that: a starting point that will put them on the right track to finding the information they need. The pathfinder itself can include tips, and the teachers and the TL can remind students of this fact, and help them along their individual learning paths, for example showing them how one resource might have a reference list with resources that may be of use to them. As we all know, each student learns in a different way, and at a different rate. There is the potential for a digital pathfinder to be of minimal use to some, and overwhelming to others. In order to prevent this as much as possible, it is important to include a range of resources to cater for all abilities, and to put a small caption with each one describing its contents. It is also important that the digital pathfinder is easy to navigate. It takes time to create a digital pathfinder. This time will need to be allocated or found. The precious time spent is worth it however, as we ultimately think about the learning goals of our students – that little bit of time we spend finding initial resources for them will help give them direction, so less learning time is wasted.Ultimately, a digital pathfinder is a worthwhile tool. Teachers, if you have not already, do contemplate the idea of collaborating with your teacher librarian to construct a digital pathfinder for your next unit of work. By doing this, not only will you be supporting student learning by helping them to obtain useful and appropriate resources, but they can be shown the things a good digital citizen does – effective use of Web 2.0 tools, referencing resources correctly, and collaborating with others to share resources. Not only is a digital pathfinder a scaffolding device to a student beginning research, it is a support to a student working towards becoming a digital citizen.
  • Independent searchingAs mentioned previously, though a digital pathfinder is a great starting point, it is essential that students spend some time finding resources independently. The ability to find information will be one that they take with them throughout their school years, and onwards into adulthood; it is an essential aspect of lifelong learning.Perhaps you have noticed your students getting frustrated as they try to find a certain piece of information on the Internet, but their searches do not produce what they need. It is likely that you have experienced this yourself. Effective searching comes with practice it is true, but there are also some strategies that can be learned or taught explicitly to increase this effectiveness. Boolean languageYou may or may not have heard the term Boolean language. Chances are, you use it to a degree either way. Chances are, like myself, you often do not use it effectively. And chances are, you do not ensure that your students are using it. Boolean language, or Boolean logic, refers primarily to the use of the operators ‘and’, ‘or’ and ‘not’ to refine your search (Cohen, 2011), though other operators can also be implemented through some search engines. The website www.boolify.org, shown on this slide not only supports the use of Boolean language, but it shows how those operations might be typed using your keyboard in a different search engine. Most search engines use the same symbols for each operation, but as some are different it can be helpful to find the section of that website that gives you details, for example the Advanced search tips page of Google (http://www.google.com.au/support/websearch/bin/answer.py?answer=136861). Using Boolean language will allow students to widen a search that is not getting enough hits, or to narrow a search that is not finding the specific information that is needed. Having a better understanding of how a search engine works, they will be more effective at finding what they need.To gain a better understanding of Boolean language and how you might apply it, or how you might help your students to do so, read the tutorial by Cohen which is listed at the end of this presentation.________________References:Cohen, L. B. (2011). Boolean searching on the Internet. Retrieved from Internet tutorials Web site: http://www.internettutorials.net/
  • Independent searching continuedSearch enginesUsing the right search terms can make a big difference to search results, but there is one other thing to think about. The search engine. Which search engine do you primarily turn to? Is it Google? If you need an answer to a question, do you ‘Google it’? Although most of the time this is a satisfactory option, it is not always the best one, particularly for our younger students. We need to introduce our students to different search engines, and help them to work out which are the most helpful for a particular task. This knowledge will come from experience, but there are also guides such as the one on the Noodletools website (linked through the image on this slide), which can help to guide us. Google is a good all-rounder, and a very effective search engine, but sometimes it is more effective to search elsewhere – we need to encourage our students (and ourselves) to constantly question and improve our information search strategies.________________References:Noodle Tools (2011).Choose the best search for your information need. Retrieved from http://noodletools.com/debbie/literacies/information/5locate/adviceengine.html
  • Compiling and sharing informationThere are a myriad of Web 2.0 tools out there that can be used to support learning. Today we will look at some that are particularly supportive in regards to compiling and/or sharing resources. BlogsBlogs can be described as an online open journal. Students create posts, and can use these to share the things they have learned, to share useful resources with their readers, and to get feedback through comments. They need to ensure that they reference their information correctly, and give correct attribution to pictures. Blogs are designed to be available for anyone to read, so students need to think very carefully about how they are representing themselves. There are many different blogging platforms to choose from, including Blogger, WordPress, andTumblr(Aune, 2007; Fitzpatrick, 2010). WikisAs discussed earlier, Wikis can be used by teacher librarians and teachers to create a digital pathfinder. Students can not only use this as a resource, following the links it provides, but depending on how it is set up, they can contribute to it as well. An effective way to do this is to have a student area of the wiki, where students can share links, ideas and useful references, as well as discuss their progress – challenges they are facing, hurdles they have jumped.________________References:Aune, S. P. (2007). 40+ free blog hosts. Retrieved from Mashable website, http://mashable.com/2007/08/06/free-blog-hosts/Fitzpatrick, J. (2010). Five best blogging platforms. Retrieved from Lifehackerwebsite, http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2010/06/five-best-blogging-platforms/
  • Compiling and sharing information continuedThe three Web 2.0 tools on this page allow students and teachers to collect and share information or websites, and to access them anywhere they have Internet access.EvernoteThis tool allows you to capture everything: notes, screen shots, web pages, photos. You can allow Evernote to sort the things you collect, or you can organise them yourself using tags and separating them into different ‘notebooks’. You can then search for these items when you need them, and you can share notebooks of your choice, either with ‘the world’, or individuals of your choice. This tool is great for collecting references, or any little snippet of information that might be useful later on, and is particularly useful for older students. DeliciousDelicious allows the user to collect links to their favourite web pages in one place – a place that is available to them anywhere they have Internet access. When a useful page is found, it’s just a matter of right-clicking to add it to Delicious, typing in some tags and a caption so it is easy to retrieve later. It is easy to network with other Delicious accounts so that resources can be shared.DiigoDiigo, like Delicious, is primarily designed to group and share web pages, and is easy to use with the same right-click function. It has additional features in the form of a toolbar, which has things like a highlighting tool, and sticky notes which can be added to any web page where they stay for all other Diigo users to read. Providing students with opportunities to use these tools will not only help them complete the research they are working on in class now, but it gives them the chance to learn about collaborating with others. They are contributing as digital citizens, helping to organise the information that is out there on the World Wide Web. It is tools like these that help us to work towards our goal – students who can use the Internet to get the information they need, and who can contribute towards what others might need as well.
  • Elements of digital citizenshipThroughout this presentation we have looked at specific steps we can take to support students in their search for information. Along the way their has been mention of students’ digital citizenship also being enhanced. We will now look at the specific elements of digital citizenship that are addressed through dealing with information in the ways described. The International Society for Technology in Education (2007) describes ‘nine elements of digital citizenship’. There are four in particular that are addressed by the things described in this presentation:Digital literacy – Using ICT effectively to support learningThe three main things described in this presentation (pathfinders, search engines and Web 2.0 tools) have been clearly described as things which students will use to support their own learning. The skills they will gain in learning to use these aspects of technology will significantly contribute to their range of digital literacy skills. Digital communication – using ICT to share informationThe third element of this presentation looked at Web 2.0 tools that specifically address sharing information with others.Digital etiquette – respecting others through responsible online behaviourBy learning about these technologies in class, students can concurrently learn about appropriate behaviour when using them. There will be opportunities for teachable moments, discussing as a class and with individuals how a good digital citizen behaves online. Furthermore, using these technologies with their classmates gives students the opportunity to realise that when they communicate online, they are affecting real people.Digital law– citing sourcesThere are also opportunities for teachable moments in regards to plagiarism. Digital pathfinders can contain advice and tips for citing sources. The Web 2.0 tools described make it easy for students to keep track of the resources they use, so that it is easy to go back and get reference details as well as the information they need. Some of these tools also encourage students to employ their citation skills – if they publish a post on their blog with an image in it, or refer to a website they got information from, then they will need to cite these sources correctly. Plagiarism is an important aspect of digital citizenship, and is specifically listed in the NSW Department of Education and Training (2006) Online communication services: acceptable usage for school students policy. It appears to be something that many students struggle with however, so any opportunity to integrate it with their learning should be taken advantage of. ________________References:International Society for Technology in Education. (2007). CHAPTER 2: The Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship. Digital Citizenship in Schools (pp. 13-37). NSW Department of Education and Training. (2006). Online communication services: acceptable usage for school students. Retrieved from DET website, https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/policies/general_man/general/accep_use/PD20020046.shtml
  • ConclusionSearching for information, organising it and sharing it – these are essential skills at school, and important for lifelong learning. We need to think carefully about the digital tools we use and encourage: how they can support student learning, and how they can prepare them for the future as digital citizens.How many doors will our students be able to open with the learning they gain from the opportunities we give them?
  • 3 QuestionsIn what ways do you think using these digital tools in the ways described will prepare students for their adult life?Which Web 2.0 tools do you think students would benefit most from, and how many do you think they could handle at once?Which of the three main ideas discussed do you think would have the most impact on student learning?5 recommended resourcesTo gain an understanding of Boolean logic/language:Cohen, L. B. (2011). Boolean searching on the Internet. Retrieved from Internet tutorials Web site:http://www.internettutorials.net/boolean.asp For help choosing a search engine:Noodle Tools (2011).Choose the best search for your information need. Retrieved from http://noodletools.com/debbie/literacies/information/5locate/adviceengine.htmlA closer look at Google:Dean, M. (2008). Google: friend or foe. Teacher (193), p. 10-12. Retrieved from http://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/fullText;dn=169831;res=AEIPTTo better understand the 9 elements of digital citizenship:International Society for Technology in Education. (2007). CHAPTER 2: The Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship. Digital Citizenship in Schools (pp. 13-37).
  • Image attribution.
  • Transcript of "The library without walls"

    1. 1. The library without walls<br />Students effectively <br />obtaining, organising and sharing <br />information from the World Wide Web<br />
    2. 2. How much information is being generated on the Internet?<br />Who is organising this information?<br />What does this mean for students today?<br />
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    12. 12. 3 Questions<br />In what ways do you think using these digital tools in the ways described will prepare students for their adult life?<br />Which Web 2.0 tools do you think students would benefit most from, and how many do you think they could handle at once?<br />Which of the three main ideas discussed do you think would have the most impact on student learning?<br />Recommended resources<br />To gain an understanding of Boolean logic/language:<br />Cohen, L. B. (2011). Boolean searching on the Internet. Retrieved from http://www.internettutorials.net/boolean.asp <br />For help choosing a search engine: <br />Noodle Tools (2011). Choose the best search for your information need. Retrieved from http://noodletools.com/debbie/literacies/information/5locate/adviceengine.html<br />A closer look at Google:<br />Dean, M. (2008). Google: friend or foe. Teacher (193), p. 10-12. Retrieved from http://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/fullText;dn=169831;res=AEIPT<br />To better understand the 9 elements of digital citizenship:<br />International Society for Technology in Education. (2007). CHAPTER 2: The Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship. Digital Citizenship in Schools (pp. 13-37).<br />
    13. 13. Original image cc licensed ( BY SD ) flickr photo by Dawn Endico: http://flickr.com/photos/candiedwomanire/1651870/<br />cc licensed ( BY NC ) flickr photo by Dave Muckey: http://flickr.com/photos/davemuckey/4065151619/<br />cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo by Stuck in Customs: http://flickr.com/photos/stuckincustoms/4481249207/<br />cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo by alles-schlumpf: http://flickr.com/photos/29487767@N02/3574392846/<br />cc licensed ( BY NC ) flickr photo by Cayusa: http://flickr.com/photos/cayusa/1444806159/<br />cc licensed ( BY NC ) flickr photo by freefotouk: http://flickr.com/photos/freefoto/3436970425/<br />cc licensed ( BY NC SD ) flickr photo by Funchye: http://flickr.com/photos/funch/3264112407/<br />cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo by heticobai: http://flickr.com/photos/23837911@N08/3025002382/<br />cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo by AZRainman: http://flickr.com/photos/azrainman/1003163361/<br />cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo by milos milosevic: http://flickr.com/photos/21496790@N06/5065834411/<br />cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo by kevindooley: http://flickr.com/photos/pagedooley/2201791390/<br />cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo by AmioCajander.: http://flickr.com/photos/10209472@N03/3824550714/<br />
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