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COTTON FASHION: CIVIL WAR: RAJ.
FASHION REVOLUTION <ul><li>“ A way of behaving that is temporarily adopted by a discernable proportion of members of a soc...
IMPACT OF COTTON <ul><li>CO-OP </li></ul><ul><li>Bandages </li></ul><ul><li>Hygiene </li></ul><ul><li>Curtains and coverin...
End of 18 th  Century a World of Rapid Fashion Change
A Drapery more suited to the climate of Greece or Italy than an island in the 51 st  degree of latitude. <ul><li>In the Di...
The World of Jane Austen <ul><li>Chemise style (Almost Grecian) </li></ul><ul><li>Could be washed, dyed, printed </li></ul...
Around 1817
BEAU BRUMMELL
Cruickshank 1818 (Dandies)
&quot; I remarked one young man, whose handsome person, and most elaborate toilet, led me to conclude he was a first rate ...
Lower Down the Social Order <ul><li>1780  Coal Heaver John Brown jailed for stealing two cotton shirts. Local records show...
PATENT No 72X  Eli Whitney 1792
BY MID 19 th  CENTURY <ul><li>BRITAIN GREW NOT ONE OUNCE OF COTTON </li></ul><ul><li>BRITAIN ONLY CONSUMED 10% OF COTTON G...
RICHARD ARKWRIGHT  ( 1732-1792) <ul><li>Credited with the spinning frame — later renamed the water frame following the tra...
CROMFORD MILL DERBYSHIRE
THE BILL GATES OF HIS DAY SELF MADE MAN <ul><li>His first steam powered mill was opened in  Manchester  in 1781, although ...
INDUSTRIAL BRITAIN
HUSKISSON <ul><li>“FIRST PERSON TO BE RUN OVER BY A RAILWAY LOCOMOTIVE” </li></ul>
TEXTILE SKILLS FROM OPPRESSION
THE WORLDS FIRST GREAT INDUSTRY LOCATED IN A FEW TOWNS IN LANCASHIRE
Huge Movement of People and New Towns and New Wealth <ul><li>Cottonopolis </li></ul><ul><li>Liverpool changes tack </li></...
Working Women <ul><li>Move from old ‘muscle industries’ and Domestic Service  </li></ul><ul><li>Cotton  was  the Industria...
A FEMALE INDUSTRY <ul><li>Changing the old social order from family based home work. </li></ul><ul><li>Industrial Discipli...
 
COTTON IS KING  (RUN BY PRINCESSES)
PLATTS to JAPANESE CARS
CIRCUMSTANCES OF GEORGIAN ENGLAND <ul><li>A VERY HARD AGE </li></ul><ul><li>A VERY YOUNG POPULATION </li></ul><ul><li>CHRI...
THE TRIANGULAR SLAVE TRADE <ul><li>Outward with manufactures </li></ul><ul><li>Slave pick-ups on coast </li></ul><ul><li>S...
LIVERPOOL  (White Gold to White Gold)
COMPASSION GRADUALLY TAKES OVER <ul><li>ADAM SMITH ON FREE LABOUR AND MARKETS </li></ul><ul><li>CHRISTIAN ETHICS: QUAKERS ...
James Henry Hammond,                                      Speech Before the United States Senate, 4 th  March 1858 <ul><li...
Famine or Grim Reaper? <ul><li>William L Yancey  (Alabama) (Confederate delegate to England) </li></ul><ul><li>“ To get co...
AND THE RESULT ON ENGLAND <ul><li>Outside the city hall stands a statue of Abraham Lincoln, presented to the citizens of M...
Further reform of Representation now had to come. <ul><li>The genie was out of the bottle </li></ul><ul><li>Expanding clas...
1867 REFORM ACT <ul><li>Second Reform Act had greatly expanded urban electorates, bringing working-class majorities to mos...
EAST INDIA COMPANY  (1660 Charter from Elizabeth I)  <ul><li>EAST INDIA DOCK ROAD </li></ul><ul><li>Calico, muslin, dungar...
PAISLEY PATTERN <ul><li>Kashmir pattern Chaldean date palm representing the tree of life. Imported into India by East Indi...
INDIAN EMPIRE  “THE JEWEL IN THE CROWN”
Flag of The East India Company <ul><li>Was it really Betsy Ross? </li></ul><ul><li>Boston Tea Party </li></ul><ul><li>From...
IMPORTED FROM INDIA <ul><li>From 1613 the Company imported Indian cloth. </li></ul><ul><li>Indigo Dye standards pushing th...
The Cotton Revolution  <ul><li>Indian Calico – Hand Printed </li></ul><ul><li>Started the greatest of all the Industrial R...
GEORGIAN TOWN LIFE <ul><li>Jane Austen </li></ul><ul><li>Literature </li></ul><ul><li>Elegance </li></ul><ul><li>Theatre a...
East Indian Company to Indian Empire
Not Just Imports: Capital Goods and Textiles to India
Imperial Policy grew to Protect Trade to India. <ul><li>Maritime trade routes </li></ul><ul><li>Around cape and via Suez <...
STIFF UPPER LIP, SHOES AND CORSETS  Lady Curzon’s Evening Dress 1902
Dhoti & Sari ---- Moslem Clothes
CLOTHING AS A REVOLUTIONARY STATEMENT
INDIAN NATIONAL FLAG
COTTON FASHION: CIVIL WAR: RAJ.
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7 Cotton Etc

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  • Transcript of "7 Cotton Etc"

    1. 1. COTTON FASHION: CIVIL WAR: RAJ.
    2. 2. FASHION REVOLUTION <ul><li>“ A way of behaving that is temporarily adopted by a discernable proportion of members of a social group because that chosen behaviour is perceived to be socially appropriate for the time and the situation.” </li></ul><ul><li>Sproles </li></ul><ul><li>“ Fashion was Rank” </li></ul><ul><li>Parson Woodford’s Diary </li></ul><ul><li>“ I meet milkmaids on every road with the looks and dress of strand misses” </li></ul><ul><li>John Byng 1781 </li></ul><ul><li>“ ----luxury of dress of our female servants----and many others in inferior situations who think that a well chosen cotton gown shall entitle them to the appellation of young ladies”. </li></ul><ul><li>London Magazine 1783 </li></ul>
    3. 3. IMPACT OF COTTON <ul><li>CO-OP </li></ul><ul><li>Bandages </li></ul><ul><li>Hygiene </li></ul><ul><li>Curtains and coverings </li></ul><ul><li>No Victorian Primness </li></ul>
    4. 4. End of 18 th Century a World of Rapid Fashion Change
    5. 5. A Drapery more suited to the climate of Greece or Italy than an island in the 51 st degree of latitude. <ul><li>In the Directoire period, plain &quot;Grecian-style&quot; fabrics were popular. </li></ul><ul><li>Gowns were tubular in shape, with little or no petticoat support. The corset, if worn, was not a factor in determining the silhouette. The natural line of the body was all too apparent through the thin gauze or cotton and linen muslins used. Waistlines were raised to just under the bust, giving the illusion of an elongated slimness. Necklines were low, round or square; sleeves were short and puffed for evening wear, as at left, and either very short or long and fitted for morning dress. </li></ul><ul><li>Shawls , such as the one pictured here with a paisley pattern, were a necessary accessory. NORWICH </li></ul>
    6. 6. The World of Jane Austen <ul><li>Chemise style (Almost Grecian) </li></ul><ul><li>Could be washed, dyed, printed </li></ul><ul><li>High quality and cheap </li></ul><ul><li>Hygiene </li></ul><ul><li>Freedom from corsets (For a time) </li></ul><ul><li>Fashion no longer just cloth but a handkerchief or petticoat of the right colour </li></ul>
    7. 7. Around 1817
    8. 8. BEAU BRUMMELL
    9. 9. Cruickshank 1818 (Dandies)
    10. 10. &quot; I remarked one young man, whose handsome person, and most elaborate toilet, led me to conclude he was a first rate personage, and so I doubt not he was; nevertheless, I saw him take from the pocket of his silk waistcoat a lump of tobacco, and daintily deposit it within his cheek&quot;. Domestic Manners of the Americans, Fanny Trollope, 1832
    11. 11. Lower Down the Social Order <ul><li>1780 Coal Heaver John Brown jailed for stealing two cotton shirts. Local records show thefts off washing lines of cotton goods. </li></ul><ul><li>Poorer sorts willing to imitate the rich John Carey (On East India Trade) </li></ul><ul><li>Fashion or the alteration of dress is a great promoter of trade because it occasions the expense of clothes before the old ones are worn out” Nicholas Barban (End of 18 th Century) </li></ul><ul><li>A) Fashion for the few exclusive </li></ul><ul><li>B) Fashion for the many an engine of growth </li></ul><ul><li>C) Demand from the working class particularly from waged Women </li></ul>
    12. 12. PATENT No 72X Eli Whitney 1792
    13. 13. BY MID 19 th CENTURY <ul><li>BRITAIN GREW NOT ONE OUNCE OF COTTON </li></ul><ul><li>BRITAIN ONLY CONSUMED 10% OF COTTON GOODS </li></ul><ul><li>Britain was producing half the world's cotton cloth in giant mills that dotted the valleys and dominated many towns in the north of England. </li></ul>
    14. 14. RICHARD ARKWRIGHT ( 1732-1792) <ul><li>Credited with the spinning frame — later renamed the water frame following the transition to water power. developed in 1769, and the world's first water-powered cotton mill was built in 1771 at Cromford Derbyshire. </li></ul><ul><li>He was knighted in 1786 . </li></ul>
    15. 15. CROMFORD MILL DERBYSHIRE
    16. 16. THE BILL GATES OF HIS DAY SELF MADE MAN <ul><li>His first steam powered mill was opened in Manchester in 1781, although it was not immediately successful. He was knighted in 1786, and died one of the richest men in England in 1792 . At the time of his death, his fortune was estimated to be in excess of £500,000. </li></ul>
    17. 17. INDUSTRIAL BRITAIN
    18. 18. HUSKISSON <ul><li>“FIRST PERSON TO BE RUN OVER BY A RAILWAY LOCOMOTIVE” </li></ul>
    19. 19. TEXTILE SKILLS FROM OPPRESSION
    20. 20. THE WORLDS FIRST GREAT INDUSTRY LOCATED IN A FEW TOWNS IN LANCASHIRE
    21. 21. Huge Movement of People and New Towns and New Wealth <ul><li>Cottonopolis </li></ul><ul><li>Liverpool changes tack </li></ul><ul><li>Chemicals </li></ul><ul><li>Leisure and Pleasure </li></ul><ul><li>Banking and Insurance </li></ul><ul><li>Health </li></ul><ul><li>A value now on work </li></ul><ul><li>Engels and Cotton </li></ul><ul><li>Free Trade Economics </li></ul>
    22. 22. Working Women <ul><li>Move from old ‘muscle industries’ and Domestic Service </li></ul><ul><li>Cotton was the Industrial Revolution !! </li></ul><ul><li>Move to new lighter industry </li></ul><ul><li>That Typing Pool </li></ul><ul><li>Move to Service and Retail work </li></ul><ul><li>Move to London and the south </li></ul><ul><li>Brainwork rather than Brawn-work </li></ul>
    23. 23. A FEMALE INDUSTRY <ul><li>Changing the old social order from family based home work. </li></ul><ul><li>Industrial Discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Machine breaking by ‘Ned Ludd’. </li></ul><ul><li>CALICO RIOTS </li></ul>
    24. 25. COTTON IS KING (RUN BY PRINCESSES)
    25. 26. PLATTS to JAPANESE CARS
    26. 27. CIRCUMSTANCES OF GEORGIAN ENGLAND <ul><li>A VERY HARD AGE </li></ul><ul><li>A VERY YOUNG POPULATION </li></ul><ul><li>CHRISTIAN SCHOLARS PREACHED THAT IT WAS INTENDED BY NATURE </li></ul><ul><li>FEUDALISM NOT MUCH BETTER in EUROPE </li></ul><ul><li>OPPORTUNITIES FOR GREAT WEALTH (Average of 10% return per annum) </li></ul>
    27. 28. THE TRIANGULAR SLAVE TRADE <ul><li>Outward with manufactures </li></ul><ul><li>Slave pick-ups on coast </li></ul><ul><li>Slaves a result of local wars </li></ul><ul><li>Danger of Disease </li></ul><ul><li>Transported to Americas </li></ul><ul><li>Voyage home with Rum, Sugar, Indigo, Tobacco, Hard woods, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>LIVERPOOL and BRISTOL </li></ul>
    28. 29. LIVERPOOL (White Gold to White Gold)
    29. 30. COMPASSION GRADUALLY TAKES OVER <ul><li>ADAM SMITH ON FREE LABOUR AND MARKETS </li></ul><ul><li>CHRISTIAN ETHICS: QUAKERS (METHODISM:WESLEY 1774) </li></ul><ul><li>JHN NEWTON (FORMER SLAVE OWNER: (”AMAZING GRACE”) </li></ul><ul><li>1772: Slaves brought into UK could not be forcibly removed. </li></ul><ul><li>1783: Slave Ship ‘Zong’ and Insurance) </li></ul><ul><li>“ WILBERFORCE BILL” 1807 Abolishes Trade. Policed on high seas by the Royal Navy. </li></ul><ul><li>Wilberforce & Clarkson: 1833 British Subjects could not own slaves. 750,000 freed in Caribbean </li></ul>
    30. 31. James Henry Hammond,                                     Speech Before the United States Senate, 4 th March 1858 <ul><li>----would any sane nation make war on cotton?  ---- What would happen if no cotton was furnished for three years? ---- England would topple headlong and carry the whole civilized world with her, save the South.   No, you dare not make war on cotton.   No power on earth dares to make war upon it.   Cotton is king.   </li></ul>
    31. 32. Famine or Grim Reaper? <ul><li>William L Yancey (Alabama) (Confederate delegate to England) </li></ul><ul><li>“ To get cotton you must swallow slavery” </li></ul><ul><li>The Times </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Cheaper to keep Lancashire in Turtles than to plunge into war with the Northern States. </li></ul><ul><li>Note Canada </li></ul>
    32. 33. AND THE RESULT ON ENGLAND <ul><li>Outside the city hall stands a statue of Abraham Lincoln, presented to the citizens of Manchester in 1919. In 1862, 98% of all the finished cotton produced world-wide came from Manchester, UK and 9 out every 10 people living in the city worked in the cotton (or related) industries. Despite the fact that the lifeblood of the city depended almost entirely on the cotton industry, the working people of Manchester came together at the Free Trade Hall on 31st December 1862 to express their support for Abraham Lincoln and the Northern States in their fight to abolish slavery. By supporting the Union under President Lincoln at a time when there was an economic blockade of the Southern States, the Lancashire cotton workers were denied access to raw cotton - the lifeblood of the region - which caused considerable unemployment and severe hardship throughout the cotton industry </li></ul>
    33. 34. Further reform of Representation now had to come. <ul><li>The genie was out of the bottle </li></ul><ul><li>Expanding class of artisan working class </li></ul><ul><li>Political parties wanted this new class to shore up their votes. </li></ul><ul><li>Head off class based Industrial parties. </li></ul>
    34. 35. 1867 REFORM ACT <ul><li>Second Reform Act had greatly expanded urban electorates, bringing working-class majorities to most towns and especially to the industrial centers. All male householders could vote, regardless of the type of dwelling they occupied, providing they had been in occupancy for at least 12 months. </li></ul><ul><li>Redistribution of seats (Ridings) </li></ul><ul><li>BUT: </li></ul><ul><li>A) NO Feckless or Slum Dwellers (Property Qualification) </li></ul><ul><li>B) AND for heavens sake no women </li></ul>
    35. 36. EAST INDIA COMPANY (1660 Charter from Elizabeth I) <ul><li>EAST INDIA DOCK ROAD </li></ul><ul><li>Calico, muslin, dungaree, gingham, bandana, cambric, chintz, seersucker, taffeta </li></ul><ul><li>Earl Grey Tea bergamot orange </li></ul>
    36. 37. PAISLEY PATTERN <ul><li>Kashmir pattern Chaldean date palm representing the tree of life. Imported into India by East India Company using Pashmina Goat Wool. After 1808 substitute cloth was made in Paisley Scotland. </li></ul>
    37. 38. INDIAN EMPIRE “THE JEWEL IN THE CROWN”
    38. 39. Flag of The East India Company <ul><li>Was it really Betsy Ross? </li></ul><ul><li>Boston Tea Party </li></ul><ul><li>From Manila Rope to Vancouver furs. </li></ul>
    39. 40. IMPORTED FROM INDIA <ul><li>From 1613 the Company imported Indian cloth. </li></ul><ul><li>Indigo Dye standards pushing the company into India. </li></ul><ul><li>Calico craze brought laws to protect English wool industry (BIW) </li></ul><ul><li>1701 Act banning imports of Indian finished cloth. EIC started to import cotton thread which started the English Cotton Industry and hit the woolen industry hard. </li></ul>
    40. 41. The Cotton Revolution <ul><li>Indian Calico – Hand Printed </li></ul><ul><li>Started the greatest of all the Industrial Revolution Industries </li></ul><ul><li>Huge employer of Women (Note Silk in Japan after Meiji Restoration) </li></ul><ul><li>Even working women could afford to buy a cotton dress. </li></ul><ul><li>RIOTS </li></ul><ul><li>No Police, Young Population, A rough hard society </li></ul>
    41. 42. GEORGIAN TOWN LIFE <ul><li>Jane Austen </li></ul><ul><li>Literature </li></ul><ul><li>Elegance </li></ul><ul><li>Theatre and walks </li></ul><ul><li>Fashion </li></ul><ul><li>Tea </li></ul><ul><li>PS: Terrible Building </li></ul>
    42. 43. East Indian Company to Indian Empire
    43. 44. Not Just Imports: Capital Goods and Textiles to India
    44. 45. Imperial Policy grew to Protect Trade to India. <ul><li>Maritime trade routes </li></ul><ul><li>Around cape and via Suez </li></ul><ul><li>Huge shipping companies </li></ul><ul><li>1935 In House of Commons. Unemployment 1 Day, Government of India Act 6 Weeks </li></ul><ul><li>NOTE OIL </li></ul>
    45. 46. STIFF UPPER LIP, SHOES AND CORSETS Lady Curzon’s Evening Dress 1902
    46. 47. Dhoti & Sari ---- Moslem Clothes
    47. 48. CLOTHING AS A REVOLUTIONARY STATEMENT
    48. 49. INDIAN NATIONAL FLAG
    49. 50. COTTON FASHION: CIVIL WAR: RAJ.
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