Jessica Golding's Social Media Presentation

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This presentation is about teens use of social media as a tool for gaining friendships.

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Jessica Golding's Social Media Presentation

  1. 1. Popularity was measured by a letter jacket? Teens were dropped off at the mall by their parents to “hang out?” Friendship bracelets meant forever? “Liking” something only had one meaning?
  2. 2. Today’s technological advances provide teens with numerous virtual outlets in which they have the ability to “virtually escape” from their surroundings. Social networks serve as virtual hangouts where teens can go to share photos, update each other on current events, moods, relationships, and health. With one click teens can connect with anyone from virtually anywhere.
  3. 3. In a national survey conducted in the United States, the majority of teens reported that engaging with social media is important for developing and maintaining friendships with peers. While these teens may see one another at school, in formal or unstructured activities, or at one another’s houses, they use social media to keep in touch with their friends, classmates, and peers when getting together is not possible. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  4. 4. Just as they have done in the past with parking lots and shopping malls, teens gather in networked public spaces for a variety of purposes, including: Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd Negotiate Identity Gossip Support One Another Jockey for Status Collaborate Share Information Flirt Joke Goof Around Hang Out
  5. 5. By providing tools for mediated interactions, social media allow teens to extend their interactions beyond physical boundaries. Conversations and interactions that begin in person do not end when friends are separated. Youth complement private communication through messaging and mobile phones with social media that support broader peer publics. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  6. 6. “While the dominant practice of teens in MySpace and Facebook conform to a hanging out, friendship- driven genre, kids sometimes also use these practices as jumping-off points to messing around and more “geeked out” interests.” – Danah Boyd Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  7. 7. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd “The young are consigned to a self-contained world with their own preoccupations, their entrance into adult status is frustrated, and they are rewarded for dependency.” - Stanley Cohen, 1972
  8. 8. For contemporary youth, the age- segregated institutions of school, after- school activities, and youth- oriented commercial culture continue to be strong structuring influences. Despite the perception that online media are enabling teens to reach out to a new set of social relations, online the relations fostered in school are by far the most dominant in how they define their peers and friendships. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  9. 9. Teens use all that is available to craft and display their social identities and interact with their peers. Like locker room and cafeteria behavior, online spaces introduce opportunities for kids to display fashion and taste, to gossip, form friend- ships, flirt, and even harass other peers. While not all teens experience bullying, most struggle with fitting in, standing out, and trying to keep up with what is cool. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  10. 10. Teens may select their friends, but their “choice” is configured by the social, cultural, and economic conditions around them Social media allow teens to move past geographic restrictions and connect with new people. This means that participants could develop relations with people who are quite different from them Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  11. 11. Teens frequently use social media as additional channels of communication to get to know classmates and turn acquaintances into friendships. While the dominant and normative social media usage pattern is to connect with friends, family, and acquaintances, there are some teens who use social media to develop connections with strangers. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  12. 12. While social media sites have the potential to radically alter the friendship- making processes, most teens use these tools to: Maintain preexisting connections Turn acquaintances into friendships Develop connections through people they already know Social media offers a platform for teens to take friendships to a new level. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  13. 13. Social media sites often alter friendship practices among teens by: Forced and often public articulation of social connections. Instant-messaging “buddy lists” to the public listing of “Friends” on social network sites Teens are regularly forced to list their connections as part of social media participation. The dynamics surrounding this can directly affect friendship practices. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  14. 14. The articulation of connections in social media serves three purposes: 1. Friend lists operate as an address book, allowing participants to keep a record of all the people they know. 2. They allow participants to leverage privacy settings to control who can access their content, who can contact them, and who can see if they are online or not. 3. The public display of connections that takes place in social network sites can represent an individual’s social identity and status (Donath and boyd, 2004). Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  15. 15. Pro’s Con’s Privacy settings allow teens to filter their friends list Deleting “friends” can cause hurt feelings and drama Being “accepted” increases confidence and aids in self- assurance Being “rejected” can make teens feel segregated or left out. Having the ability to filter gives teens a sense of privacy and power Such power can sometimes aid in virtual forms of bullying SNSs provide instant feedback when teens post new pictures, updates, and relationship statuses Not all feedback is positive. Everything that is posted is open for judgment
  16. 16. A Friend connection alone says nothing about its strength. By accepting all acquaintances as Friends, teens can avoid offending peers who might believe there to be a stronger connection Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  17. 17. MySpace’s Top Friends feature forces teens to publicly list their best and “bestest” friends. This feature requires participants to list up to 24 names in a grid. This feature quickly became a social battleground as participants struggled over who should make the list and, more important, who should be in the first position. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  18. 18. Teens seeking to spread rumors or engage in drama often use social media. These acts may be lightweight parts of everyday teen life or they may snowball in magnitude and become acts of bullying.
  19. 19. The public, persistent, searchable, and spreadable nature of mediated information affects the way rumors flow and how dramas play out. The explicitness surrounding the display of relationships and online communication can heighten the social stakes and intensity of status negotiation. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  20. 20. Social media allows teens to be more carefully attuned, in an ongoing way, to the lives of their friends and peers. Social media sites are integrally tied to the processes of building, performing, articulating, and developing friendships and status in teen peer networks. Teens value social media because they help them build, maintain, and develop friendships with peers. Social media plays a crucial role in teens’ ability to share ideas, cultural artifacts, and emotions with one another. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd
  21. 21. Teens utilize social media for various reasons: gossiping, flirting, networking, joking around and hanging out. Social media sites mirror and magnify teen friendship practices. Positive interactions are enhanced through social media while negative interactions are also intensified. Chapter 2 of “Hanging out, Messing Around and Geeking Out,” Danah Boyd

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