How to Draw a Force Diagram

12,347 views
11,883 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
12,347
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

How to Draw a Force Diagram

  1. 1. How to Draw a Force Diagram to Find the Net Force Acting on an Object<br />
  2. 2. First, identify the object (or the system of objects) which you wish to study.<br />In this example, our system will be Ms. Clanton standing still in the physical science classroom<br />
  3. 3. Next, draw a rectangle or a circle to represent the object (or system of objects) which you are studying.<br />Draw a dashed circle around the object you are studying; the dashed circle represents the system you are studying. Only the object (or system) you are studying is in the dashed circle; everything else is outside.<br />
  4. 4. Next, draw a rectangle or a circle to represent the object (or system of objects) which you are studying.<br />Draw a dashed circle around the object you are studying; the dashed circle represents the system you are studying. Only the object (or system) you are studying is in the dashed circle; everything else is outside.<br />
  5. 5. Then, draw everything which touches the object (or system of objects) which you are studying.<br />
  6. 6. Next, identify any forces which are acting on the object you are studying.<br />At least one contact force acts at each point where the object you are studying is touched.<br />Identify any forces which act at a distance (gravity, for instance). <br />
  7. 7. Next, identify any forces which are acting on the object you are studying.<br />At least one contact force acts at each point where the object you are studying is touched.<br />Identify any forces which act at a distance (gravity, for instance). <br />
  8. 8. Next, identify any forces which are acting on the object you are studying.<br />At least one contact force acts at each point where the object you are studying is touched.<br />Identify any forces which act at a distance (gravity, for instance). <br />Contact Force: Support Force<br />
  9. 9. Next, identify any forces which are acting on the object you are studying.<br />At least one contact force acts at each point where the object you are studying is touched.<br />Identify any forces which act at a distance (gravity, for instance). <br />Support Force<br />Contact Force: Support Force<br />
  10. 10. Next, identify any forces which are acting on the object you are studying.<br />At least one contact force acts at each point where the object you are studying is touched.<br />Identify any forces which act at a distance (gravity, for instance). <br />Support Force<br />
  11. 11. Next, identify any forces which are acting on the object you are studying.<br />At least one contact force acts at each point where the object you are studying is touched.<br />Identify any forces which act at a distance (gravity, for instance). <br />Gravity always pulls down on an object if the object is at or near the surface of the earth.<br />Support Force<br />
  12. 12. Next, identify any forces which are acting on the object you are studying.<br />At least one contact force acts at each point where the object you are studying is touched.<br />Identify any forces which act at a distance (gravity, for instance). <br />Gravity always pulls down on an object if the object is at or near the surface of the earth.<br />Support Force<br />Force of Gravity<br />
  13. 13. Finally, you can find the net force acting on the object you are studying by adding up all of the force vectors in the diagram.<br />For this example, the force vectors are equal in size but opposite in direction. So, they cancel out.<br />The net force acting on the object we are studying is zero.<br />Support Force<br />Force of Gravity<br />
  14. 14. Finally, you can find the net force acting on the object you are studying by adding up all of the force vectors in the diagram.<br />For this example, the force vectors are equal in size but opposite in direction. So, they cancel out.<br />The net force acting on the object we are studying is zero.<br />Support Force<br />Force of Gravity<br />
  15. 15. Finally, you can find the net force acting on the object you are studying by adding up all of the force vectors in the diagram.<br />For this example, the force vectors are equal in size but opposite in direction. So, they cancel out.<br />The net force acting on the object we are studying is zero.<br />Support Force<br />Force of Gravity<br />Net Force = 0<br />

×