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Elements of Art: Foundations
 

Elements of Art: Foundations

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Explore the Elements of Art with definitions, examples, and pictures.

Explore the Elements of Art with definitions, examples, and pictures.

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    Elements of Art: Foundations Elements of Art: Foundations Presentation Transcript

    • Foundations Jes Davis
    • Line is defined as a mark that spans a distance between two points (or the path of a moving point), taking any form along the way. Lines may be real (left) or implied (right) Matisse Edward Hopper
    • Shape pertains to the use of areas in two dimensional space that can be defined by edges, setting one flat specific space apart from another. Shapes can be geometric (e.g.: square, circle, hexagon, etc.) or organic (such as the shape of a puddle, blob, leaf, boomerang, etc.) Matisse Kandinsky
    • form implies depth, length, and width and is perceived as 3-dimensional (left) or the illusion of 3D qualities with value and contrast (right). Michelangelo MC Escher
    • Color pertains to the use of hue in artwork and design. All of the colors are derived from the three primary colors (red, blue, and yellow) and black and white. Color has three properties: hue, value, and intensity Further combinations of primary and secondary colors create tertiary (and more) hues. Mondrain
    • Value refers to the relative level or darkness or lightness of a color in terms of contrast (left,) Raphael
    • Texture refers to the tactile (touchable) qualities of an object. Real texture can be felt and implied texture is 2D. Rauschenberg Bernini
    • Space is the area in which art is organized. It could be positive and negative; atmospheric; or foreground middle-ground, and back-ground. Da VinciMC Escher