French Rev lecture

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Lecture Slides from September 20 & 22nd

Lecture Slides from September 20 & 22nd

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Transcript

  • 1. The French Revolution
    • September 20 & 22nd
  • 2. Reminders...
    • About the presentation, or essays any questions?
    • The Rachid Ouramdane performance
    • New York Live Arts, 219 W. 19th Street, btwn 7th and 8th Ave
      • $22 adv for all performances/ $15 for Oct 12th and $27 for day of
          • Ordinary Witness (Oct 11 @ 6:30 pm & Oct 12 @ 7:30pm w/ post-show)
            • World Fair ( 7:30 Pm Oct 14th w/ post-show & 15)
  • 3.
    • How to write a good essay:
    • Argumentative thesis
    • Good evidence support
    • Utilize primary sources, but don’t have any block quotes (it’s a short essay)
    • Make a personal observation
    • Make me want to read it
    • Bring it to class, or else it is late
  • 4. Agenda 1. Go over essay for Thursday 2. French Revolution, the Moderate Phase 3. Holly’s presentation
  • 5. “ What is the Third Estate?” by Abbé Sieyès (Holly Rittweger)
    • First Estate:
      • Clergy
    • Second Estate:
      • Aristocracy
    • Third Estate:
      • 96% of population
  • 6. Louis XIV engraving June 11, 1775
  • 7.
    • anticlericalism as politics
    est. 1791 pornographic monk “ I’m coming.... I am the good Constitution.”
  • 8. From Histoire de Dam B (1748) Clergy and nobles
  • 9.
    • Voltaire nude Jean-Baptiste Pigalle 1778
    Enlightenment becomes a cult for political revolution
  • 10. Attack on Necker (1789–1790)
  • 11. Jacques Louis David The Oath of the Tennis Court 1791
  • 12. The October Days
  • 13.  
  • 14. Cahiers des Doléances
    • Your Grace,
    • The unhappy inhabitants of the parishes of the seigneurie of Montjoye-Vaufrey in Upper Alsace have the honor of bringing to your attention a statement of their grievances regarding the arbitrary and vexatious burdens with which their seigneur, on the basis of his personal authority and without title, overwhelms them.
    • If your Grace would deign to take account of all the revolting and inhumane injustices described in this statement, from your sense of fairness they dare to hope for reform.
    • Joseph Erard and Jean Francois Voysard, who have been sent to wait on Your Grace to appeal to your humanity and beneficence and to obtain a consoling decision, are staying at the Grand Marlbourough at Versailles where they await Your Grace's orders.
  • 15.
    • The Moderate Phase (from the textbook page 466–67)
    • Taking away favoritism
    • Statement of Human rights
    • State over church
    • Constitution for France
    • Reworking of government
    • Helping along commerce
  • 16. French Revolution Counter Revolution and Radical Phase Counter Revolution and Radical Phase Thursday’s class
  • 17.
    • Review French Revolution moderate phase
      • Chronology until 1791
      • Outcomes
    • Human Rights
      • For slaves / For Saint Domingue (Haiti)
      • For Jews & Protestants
      • For women (Rachel K.)
    • The Terror begins
      • Execution of Louis XVI
  • 18. Counterrevolution
    • Definition of counterrevolution
    • February 1790: Pope denounces Revolution
  • 19.
    • Constitution of 1791 (constitutional monarchy)
      • “Louis XVI, by grace of god and the constitutional law...”
      • June 1791: Royal family disappears toward Metz
  • 20. Captured in Varennes
  • 21.
    • “ Assure each Jewish individual his liberty, security, and the enjoyment of his property. You owe him nothing more. He is a foreigner to whom, during the time of his passage and his stay, France owes hospitality, protection and security.” –La Fare Spring 1790
  • 22.
    • “ I ask...that it be declared, relative to the Jews, that they will be able to become active citizens, like all the peoples of the world, by fulfilling the conditions described by the constitution” (Duport at the admission of Jews to rights of citizenship, Sept. 1791)
  • 23.
    • Human Rights? Universal Freedoms
    • Rachel Kasold on the rights of women
  • 24.
    • Toussaint L’Ouverture & the slave rebellion in Saint Domingue
    • 1794 slavery outlawed
  • 25. Transporting Voltaire’s Remains to the Panthéon July 11, 1791
  • 26. The Radical Phase
    • The Revolutionaries confront their own contradictions.
    • Vocabulary
      • Jacobins
      • Sans-Coulottes
      • Maximilien Robespierre
  • 27. Features of the revolution Total rebellion from what came before From Marquis de Sade, who was a writer released from prison in 1790
  • 28. Radical phase
  • 29.
    • An exuberant execution
  • 30.
    • Was it necessary to kill the king for revolution?
  • 31.  
  • 32.
    • A whole new calendar
  • 33. C urrent Date and Time ten days of the week 4 seasons named after different Greek gods
  • 34. Cult of Supreme Being
  • 35.
    • In 1794, this "cult of the Supreme Being" briefly replaced Catholicism as the official religion of France. This poster declares, "The French people recognize the Supreme Being and the immortality of the soul."
    Temple of Reason Pantheon
  • 36. Death of Robespierre
  • 37. Robespierre getting killed by the guillotine after having “guillotined” all of France
  • 38. R’s death as divine retribution