Polygons presentation

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Polygons presentation

  1. 1. EVERYDAY
  2. 2. PolygonA polygon is a closed figure made by joining line segments, where each line segment intersects exactly two others.
  3. 3. Q: Is this a polygon? Why or why not? A: No… Polygons are closed figures.
  4. 4. Q: Is this a polygon? Why or why not? A: No… It is not made of line segments.
  5. 5. Q: Is this a polygon? Why or why not? A: No… Its sides do not intersect in exactly two places each.
  6. 6. Regular PolygonsA regular polygon is a polygon whose sides are all the same length, and whose angles are allthe same. The sum of the angles of a polygon with n sides, where n is 3 or more, is 180° × (n - 2) degrees.
  7. 7. Are these regular polygons? Why or why not? A: No…These sides are all the different lengths, and the angles are all different.
  8. 8. Vertex• The vertex of an angle is the point where the two rays that form the angle intersect.
  9. 9. Vertex of a Polygon• The vertices of a polygon are the points where its sides intersect.
  10. 10. TriangleA three-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a triangle is 180 degrees.
  11. 11. Equilateral TriangleA triangle having all three sides of equal length. The angles of an equilateral triangle all measure 60 degrees.
  12. 12. Isosceles TriangleA triangle having two sides of equal length.
  13. 13. Scalene TriangleA triangle having three sides of different lengths.
  14. 14. Acute TriangleA triangle having three acute angles.
  15. 15. Obtuse TriangleA triangle having an obtuse angle. One of the angles of the trianglemeasures more than 90 degrees.
  16. 16. Right TriangleA triangle having a right angle. One of the angles of the triangle measures 90 degrees.
  17. 17. QuadrilateralA four-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a quadrilateral is 360 degrees.
  18. 18. RectangleA four-sided polygon having all right angles. The sum of the angles of a rectangle is 360 degrees.
  19. 19. SquareA four-sided polygon having equal-lengthsides meeting at right angles. The sum of the angles of a square is 360 degrees.
  20. 20. Parallelogram A four-sided polygon with two pairs ofparallel sides. The sum of the angles of a parallelogram is 360 degrees.
  21. 21. Rhombus A four-sided polygon having all four sidesof equal length. The sum of the angles of a rhombus is 360 degrees.
  22. 22. TrapezoidA four-sided polygon having exactly one pair of parallel sides. The two sides that are parallelare called the bases of the trapezoid. The sum of the angles of a trapezoid is 360 degrees.
  23. 23. Pentagon A five-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a pentagon is 540 degrees.A regular pentagon: An irregular pentagon:
  24. 24. HexagonA six-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a hexagon is 720 degrees. A regular hexagon: An irregular hexagon:
  25. 25. HeptagonA seven-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a heptagon is 900 degrees. A regular heptagon: An irregular heptagon:
  26. 26. OctagonAn eight-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of an octagon is 1080 degrees. A regular octagon: An irregular octagon:
  27. 27. NonagonA nine-sided polygon. The sum of theangles of a nonagon is 1260 degrees. A regular nonagon: An irregular nonagon:
  28. 28. DecagonA ten-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a decagon is 1440 degrees. A regular decagon: An irregular decagon:
  29. 29. CircleA circle is the collection of points in a plane that are allthe same distance from a fixed point. The fixed point is called the center. A line segment joining the center to any point on the circle is called a radius.
  30. 30. ConvexA figure is convex if every line segment drawn betweenany two points inside the figure lies entirely inside the figure. A figure that is not convex is called a concave figure. Convex: Concave:
  31. 31. Credits• Math League – Steve Conrad http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/ polygons.htm

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