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Polygons presentation

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  • 1. EVERYDAY
  • 2. PolygonA polygon is a closed figure made by joining line segments, where each line segment intersects exactly two others.
  • 3. Q: Is this a polygon? Why or why not? A: No… Polygons are closed figures.
  • 4. Q: Is this a polygon? Why or why not? A: No… It is not made of line segments.
  • 5. Q: Is this a polygon? Why or why not? A: No… Its sides do not intersect in exactly two places each.
  • 6. Regular PolygonsA regular polygon is a polygon whose sides are all the same length, and whose angles are allthe same. The sum of the angles of a polygon with n sides, where n is 3 or more, is 180° × (n - 2) degrees.
  • 7. Are these regular polygons? Why or why not? A: No…These sides are all the different lengths, and the angles are all different.
  • 8. Vertex• The vertex of an angle is the point where the two rays that form the angle intersect.
  • 9. Vertex of a Polygon• The vertices of a polygon are the points where its sides intersect.
  • 10. TriangleA three-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a triangle is 180 degrees.
  • 11. Equilateral TriangleA triangle having all three sides of equal length. The angles of an equilateral triangle all measure 60 degrees.
  • 12. Isosceles TriangleA triangle having two sides of equal length.
  • 13. Scalene TriangleA triangle having three sides of different lengths.
  • 14. Acute TriangleA triangle having three acute angles.
  • 15. Obtuse TriangleA triangle having an obtuse angle. One of the angles of the trianglemeasures more than 90 degrees.
  • 16. Right TriangleA triangle having a right angle. One of the angles of the triangle measures 90 degrees.
  • 17. QuadrilateralA four-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a quadrilateral is 360 degrees.
  • 18. RectangleA four-sided polygon having all right angles. The sum of the angles of a rectangle is 360 degrees.
  • 19. SquareA four-sided polygon having equal-lengthsides meeting at right angles. The sum of the angles of a square is 360 degrees.
  • 20. Parallelogram A four-sided polygon with two pairs ofparallel sides. The sum of the angles of a parallelogram is 360 degrees.
  • 21. Rhombus A four-sided polygon having all four sidesof equal length. The sum of the angles of a rhombus is 360 degrees.
  • 22. TrapezoidA four-sided polygon having exactly one pair of parallel sides. The two sides that are parallelare called the bases of the trapezoid. The sum of the angles of a trapezoid is 360 degrees.
  • 23. Pentagon A five-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a pentagon is 540 degrees.A regular pentagon: An irregular pentagon:
  • 24. HexagonA six-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a hexagon is 720 degrees. A regular hexagon: An irregular hexagon:
  • 25. HeptagonA seven-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a heptagon is 900 degrees. A regular heptagon: An irregular heptagon:
  • 26. OctagonAn eight-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of an octagon is 1080 degrees. A regular octagon: An irregular octagon:
  • 27. NonagonA nine-sided polygon. The sum of theangles of a nonagon is 1260 degrees. A regular nonagon: An irregular nonagon:
  • 28. DecagonA ten-sided polygon. The sum of the angles of a decagon is 1440 degrees. A regular decagon: An irregular decagon:
  • 29. CircleA circle is the collection of points in a plane that are allthe same distance from a fixed point. The fixed point is called the center. A line segment joining the center to any point on the circle is called a radius.
  • 30. ConvexA figure is convex if every line segment drawn betweenany two points inside the figure lies entirely inside the figure. A figure that is not convex is called a concave figure. Convex: Concave:
  • 31. Credits• Math League – Steve Conrad http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/ polygons.htm

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