Jesse Wilkins, CRM, Information Certified       Director, Systems of Engagement                       AIIM International
   Introduction   Review of relevant social technologies and    use cases   The social business roadmap   Applying the...
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Era      Mainframe      Mini        PC       Internet    ???                       Systems of Record            1960-     ...
Systems of RecordCommand and control Transaction-oriented     Data-centric  User learns system Security is key issue      ...
“A new class of company isemerging—one that usescollaborative Web 2.0technologies intensively toconnect the internal effor...
Systems of Engagement                                                         Social and  Era      Mainframe     Mini     ...
Systems of Record    Systems of Engagement  Command and             Open and      control             accessible   Transac...
Consideration         Systems of Record           Systems of EngagementFocus                 Transactions                I...
   Introduction   Review of relevant social technologies and    use cases   The social business roadmap   Applying the...
Blogs        11
 Internal announcements External announcements and press  releases Project documentation Knowledge management Any bro...
Provide project updates                          13
Provide organizational updates                                 14
   “It is part text messaging and part    blogging, with the ability to update on your    cell phone or computer, but con...
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Source: Stewart Mader, www.ikiw.org                                      20
Create agenda and minutes                            21
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Keep in touch                27
Network and announce events                              28
Share information                    29
Find your next job                     30
Respond to crises                    31
Do answers to questions generally come from expected or unexpected sources?                                        0%   5%...
Our open innovation platform has been successful at: (Check all that apply)                                        0%   10...
Before/after the social infrastructure was in place, how well did/do the Sales andMarketing staff:                        ...
   Introduction   Review of relevant social technologies and    use cases   The social business roadmap   Applying the...
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   Describes steps to    implement social business   NOT necessarily linear   Will vary substantially    between organi...
   Not a step in the roadmap, but necessary    precursor to successful social business    initiatives    ◦ Transparency  ...
◦ Requires that the organization move from a culture  of knowledge hoarding to one of knowledge  sharing.                 ...
Requires that the organization trust its users to do whatis right, while supporting them with the training andgovernance r...
Requires willingness to allow employees to experimentwith new tools and processes, trusting that they will notabuse them a...
   Experimental use of technologies   “Under the radar”   Proof of concept                                       43
   Formalization of approach   Social business assessment   Planning and project management   Internal marketing and c...
   Identify desired capabilities and deployment    options   Procure and implement tools   Develop and deliver    train...
Source: Govloop.com                      46
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   Listen to conversations before jumping into    them   Look for tone and sentiment   Watch for complaints   Set up q...
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   Seed content into tools   Use the tools!   Consistent messaging across tools   Be patient                          ...
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   Move from listening and broadcasting to    engagement   Plan for engagement   Authenticity and personality key      ...
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   The US Air Force’s    Rules of Engagement    for Blogging                          55
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   Policies and guidelines   Restrictions on tools and content   Internal monitoring   Records management   Legal iss...
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   Encourage uptake of the tools   Monitor efficacy of tools   Measure and analyze tools and processes   Identify chan...
   Introduction   Review of relevant social technologies and    use cases   The social business roadmap   Applying the...
   Strategy assessment   Technology assessment   External brand assessment   Culture assessment   Process assessment...
   What are the goals and objectives?   Who are the stakeholders?   What are competitors doing?   Who and where are th...
   Is the organization already using social    technologies?    ◦ Commercial    ◦ External    ◦ Internal   Are there any...
   Are there unofficial accounts in place on    commercial services?   Are there any undesired accounts in place?    ◦ P...
   Is the organization collaborative, open, and    sharing?   Are there incentives or disincentives for    innovation? ...
   Do any existing business processes use social    technologies?   What processes are likely candidates for    social b...
   Is there a social media policy in place?   Are employees trained on it?   Are there employees with dedicated    gove...
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   Introduction   Review of relevant social technologies and    use cases   The social business roadmap   Applying the...
By the end of 2013, half of allcompanies will have been askedto produce material from socialmedia websites for e-discovery...
Is a Facebook “like” a record?                                 73
Prohibition is not realistic                               74
   Ensures that employees know what is    expected of them   Provides guidelines for being more effective   Reduces ris...
   Determines overall strategic goals of    organization   Provides support for social media    initiative(s)   Determi...
   Governance roles required to ensure    compliance with the framework   Includes usual suspects…   Also includes new ...
   Social content is just another form of    content   Policy should provide a framework    applicable to most or all so...
Official vs. unofficialLink to social media policy                              79
Creation of official accounts                                80
   Account details    ◦   User name    ◦   Picture    ◦   Corporate logo usage    ◦   Bio    ◦   Contact information   F...
   Whether posts will require approval   Pictures and video    ◦ By the organization    ◦ By third parties   Links (i.e...
   Access to personal accounts using    organizational resources    (time, computers, network, etc.)   Access to sites u...
   Acceptable and unacceptable groups   Perception of approval                                         84
   Offensive content   Disparagement of the organization – or of    competitors or others   Slander or libel   Sexual ...
   Personnel-related information   Financial information   Confidential information   Health information   If you wou...
Monitoring and reviewing comments                                    87
   Whether the account is monitored for    actionable content (screenshot)               Public records         Monitorin...
   Conduct your own social media assessment   Review/update/create social media    governance framework   Develop your ...
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Jesse Wilkins, CRM, Information CertifiedDirector, Systems of EngagementAIIM International      +1 (303) 574-0749 direct  ...
   Available under Creative    Commons – you can add to    and expand   www.aiim.org/roadmap                            ...
   2-day instructor-led or online course   Includes:    ◦ Specific governance elements for      Facebook, Twitter, other...
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20111031 KMWorld 2011 Applying the Social Business Roadmap to Your Organization

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This workshop delivered at KMWorld 2011 outlined the essential steps in the AIIM social business roadmap, presented a high-level assessment to conduct in order to develop an organization-specific roadmap, and outlined key strategies for the governance portion of the roadmap.

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  • Slide 1: Title SlideInsert the ARMA approved title for your session (this title can be found in your contract or by visiting http://www.arma.org/learningcenter/facilitator/programdetails/index.cfm Click on My Program Details for your finalized title.)Insert the facilitator’s name.If you choose, insert the facilitator’s job title and company name.Insert the Education Code. This also can be found on the website at: http://www.arma.org/learningcenter/facilitator/programdetails/index.cfm
  • Slide 2: Learning ObjectivesThe second slide of your presentation must be your ARMA approved learning objectives.(These learning objectives can be found in your contract or by visiting http://www.arma.org/learningcenter/facilitator/programdetails/index.cfm)
  • During my professional lifetime, I have seen at least 4 major enterprise IT transformations, and they seem to be occurring with increasing acceleration. When I first came into the workforce, the enterprise IT norm was centered on mainframe computers focused on batch-processed financial applications. This was the era of Burroughs and Univac and NCR and Control Data and Honeywell. This era was soon eclipsed by the rise of minicomputers.Minis were themselves eclipsed by the PC revolution, stitched together in Local Area Networks. Steroids in the form of the internet changed everything about how we connected PCs together distributed documents and information around our organizations. And then along came Google and our expectations about enterprise IT and simplicity of use morphed once again.
  • 1518We have spent the past several decades of IT investment focused on deploying 'systems of record.'  Transaction systems for global commerce . . . Financials, Order Processing, Inventory, HR, CRM, Supply Chain . . .Mainframes, minis, client-server, PC, Internet-enabled, SaaSDrove three decades of investmentData centers everywhereDatabases, OLTP, reporting and analyticsNetwork as a transport mechanismThese systems accomplished two important things: First, they centralized, standardized, and automated business transactions on a global basis, thereby better enabling world trade.  Second, they gave top management a global view of the state of the business, thereby better enabling global business management.   Spending on the Enterprise Content Management technologies that are at the core of Systems of Record will continue -- and will actually expand as these solutions become more available and relevant to small and mid-sized organizations
  • 1050“A new class of company is emerging—one that uses collaborative Web 2.0 technologies intensively to connect the internal efforts of employees and to extend the organization’s reach to customers, partners, and suppliers. We call this new kind of company the networked enterprise.”
  • The challenges here are enormous. Expectations of Enterprise IT are rising. The business, still reeling from the crash of 2008, is questioning the rigidity and cost of legacy systems. The focus of IT is changing from a traditional focus on standardizing and automating back-end manual processes – a focus on CONTROL – to a focus on empowering and connecting knowledge workers and improving knowledge worker productivity and innovation. in the world of Systems of Engagement – no one on the user side cares about any of this. However, because these systems are being used by enterprises, they will inevitably be subject to the same legal and social restrictions as traditional enterprise content, and therein lies the rub. Today that rub is significantly limiting endorsement and adoption of consumer-style communication and collaboration facilities around the world, and it will continue to do so until the content management industry and its customers develop protocols and policies to address its issues.
  • The challenges here are enormous. Expectations of Enterprise IT are rising. The business, still reeling from the crash of 2008, is questioning the rigidity and cost of legacy systems. The focus of IT is changing from a traditional focus on standardizing and automating back-end manual processes – a focus on CONTROL – to a focus on empowering and connecting knowledge workers and improving knowledge worker productivity and innovation.
  • Slide 2: Learning ObjectivesThe second slide of your presentation must be your ARMA approved learning objectives.(These learning objectives can be found in your contract or by visiting http://www.arma.org/learningcenter/facilitator/programdetails/index.cfm)
  • Not just Twitter, but since it is by far the most successful at this point the examples for the first two sections will largely focus on it.
  • Wikis are another really common example of Web 2.0 tools. Whereas blogs are designed for one-way broadcast-type communications, wikis are genuinely collaborative tools. The most well-known example of this is Wikipedia, the encyclopedia that anyone can edit. As I noted earlier Wikipedia includes more than 13 million articles in 260+ languages. Compare this with the EncyclopediaBrittanica, which includes some 65,000 articles in its 35-volume set. Wikis make it easy to collaborate on a particular document or deliverable – click Edit, make your changes, click Save or Publish. Changes are tracked to the individual character level, and for private wikis, can be integrated into your Active Directory or identity infrastructure so as to prohibit anonymous changes.
  • Social sharing tools, as the name suggests, are tools useful for sharing particular types of content. The most well-known ones include YouTube, for sharing video; Flickr, for sharing photographs; Delicious, for sharing bookmarks; Box.net, for sharing files; and Slideshare, for sharing presentations and other documents. I will be posting this presentation to my Slideshare account later this week. Here is a screenshot of YouTube. You can see some of the social aspects of Youtube here, including ratings; the ability to mark it as a favorite; the ability to subscribe to updates either of the video or by the author; and the ability to share a video in a number of ways including sending a link or embedding it directly in another web application such as a blog or Facebook. Users can also comment on individual videos via text or by posting video responses. Most of the other social sharing tools offer similar capabilities. [twitter]Screenshot of YouTube as example of social sharing tool. Others include Box.net, Slideshare, Delicious, and Flickr.[/twitter]
  • It’s LinkedIn (and other websites like it, like Plaxo)….
  • Keep in touch with remote offices, colleagues, and even familyNetworking - personal, professional, career
  • Learn new things. Lots of what folks post day-in and day-out is trivial. Then again, so is the RECMGMT-L listserv – and yet how many of you are on that and swear by the value you receive from it?
  • 80% of companies use social media for recruitment – 95% use LinkedIn. And every recruiter and HR manager does due diligence on candidates using Google – and the top links for many are their profiles on LinkedIn, Facebook, etc.
  • Because information can be easily augmented with photos, videos, and links
  • Slide 2: Learning ObjectivesThe second slide of your presentation must be your ARMA approved learning objectives.(These learning objectives can be found in your contract or by visiting http://www.arma.org/learningcenter/facilitator/programdetails/index.cfm)
  • 1542: Question: What are the prerequisites for Social Business?0. Empowerment: personal projects, measure outcomes, freedom to experiment- Transparency requires that the organization move from a culture of knowledge hoarding to one of knowledge sharing.- Trust requires that the organization trust its users to do what is right, while supporting them with the training and governance required for them to be accountable for that trust.- And technology requires willingness to allow employees to experiment with new tools and processes, trusting that they will not abuse them and permitting them to “fail fast.”
  • 1549
  • Identifying what tools to use – here, wiki, blog, user ratings of appsSetting up navigation and classificationDeploying social sharing widgets (which ones, how)
  • 1551 Monitoring/Listening: Viral implementationInitially the organization should spend time listening to the conversations taking place in and around a particular tool to get a sense of the nature of the tool, the content of the conversations, the target audiences, and who the leading participants are.This is perhaps more visible in externally focused processes but is important for internal ones as well.QUESTION: How do you support a viral adoption? Answer: rumors, communication, ambassadors, show people, show benefits- 4.1 Listen to internal sites and comments- 4.2 Listen to external sites and comments- 4.3 Set up queries and alerts- 4.4 Empower community managers
  • http://www.onesocialmedia.com/2011/02/social-media-listening-in-real-time-case-study-toyota-of-des-moines/Social Media account manager was lucky enough to have seen this post only 5 minutes after it had been posted. Because the Facebook post was fairly recent, I decided to call someone at Toyota of Des Moines. I wanted to see if they could find the displeased customer before she left the dealership, in hopes that they could try to work through the issue with her in person. As luck would have it, the customer was still at the dealership at the time that I called to inform them of the post. They were able to talk with her, to let her know that they saw her Facebook post, and that they wanted to work through the issue with her. 
  • 1553. Participation: Getting all relevant people to get involvedOnce the organization has done some listening it will be able to participate more meaningfully and should begin doing so according to what it has learned about the target market and the nature of the conversations on the various tools.QUESTION: How do you get all relevant people involved? Answer: Demonstrate benefits, carrot/stick, etc.- 5.1 Seed content into the tools5.2 Ensure consistent messaging across platformsAnd split this step into stages; e.g first get people to register
  • Move from listening and broadcasting to engagementPlan for engagementTriage for comments, external mentionsEngagement on public, commercial, and third-party sitesAuthenticity and personality
  • 1559 CNN iReporterhttp://ireport.cnn.com/community/assignmentCNN’s iReport assignment desk is an example of community evolution of technology and communication. Eachday and throughout the day as news breaks, the editors of the iReport page put up assignments to the citizenjournalists to help get real and participatory news live from wherever in the world it is happening. They haveembraced the evolution of technology by asking for submissions as the technology evolves and connecting itwith social media through hashtags on Twitter.This creates additional conversation around not only contributions, but the delivery medium itself. Those noteven connected to CNN are able to participate in the conversation because it is being held at the widest possibledistribution point or audience, out in the open on social media streams.
  • 1610
  • This is an example of a guideline for how to engage those that comment on your social media, and those that post or comment on third party sites. This triage chart from the American Society of Chemical Engineers is not for every user in the organization, but it can be quite useful for those responsible for monitoring and engaging comments about the organization such as public affairs.
  • 1604
  • Slide 2: Learning ObjectivesThe second slide of your presentation must be your ARMA approved learning objectives.(These learning objectives can be found in your contract or by visiting http://www.arma.org/learningcenter/facilitator/programdetails/index.cfm)
  • Slide 2: Learning ObjectivesThe second slide of your presentation must be your ARMA approved learning objectives.(These learning objectives can be found in your contract or by visiting http://www.arma.org/learningcenter/facilitator/programdetails/index.cfm)
  • The first step many organizations take to manage Web 2.0 is to try to block them. This is unrealistic for a number of reasons.
  • Technology changes much faster than the law or policies can keep up with. That’s why it’s better to use a comprehensive policy that can cover new technologies as they appear.
  • Official vs. unofficial includesDisclaimers (this is or is not official; disclaimer of responsibility if it isn’t)Also includes a link to his social media policy
  • Whether approval is required to create an account (official only)It’s also useful, as CSU does, to list all the official accounts somewhere on the website.
  • This includes things like:What user names are appropriate, and whether to use the organization as part of it (e.g. Dell_JeffW)Pictures – same thingBio – same thing, plus things like official account, name (and sometimes personal Twitter handle) of the person behind the account, etc. Different types of contact informationIt’s also valuable to have guidelines for what types of contacts are appropriate. An official federal government account could “friend” Barack Obama on Twitter, but probably shouldn’t friend his re-election campaign or the Democratic Party (and even if it did the Republican Party as well, it’s still problematic). Similarly, it might look a bit odd for an energy company account to “friend” a parody account like BPGlobalPR, or a competitor, or an unsavory group, etc.
  • Pretty straightforward here. Three main points:If third party content is allowed, it should be reviewed so people don’t upload pornography, etc. If it is reviewed, the organization may have some responsibility to remove things that are inappropriate. This should be spelled out clearly and adhered to rigorously – all goes back to transparency. If an official account “likes” something on Facebook, or retweets something on Twitter, this could be considered approval or even recommendation – and if it’s something offensive, or illegal, or otherwise inappropriate, this could cause serious issues.
  • The policy should outline what types of groups are appropriate and what types of groups should be out of bounds. This is especially important for official commercial accounts but could be applicable even to personal accounts where the connection could be made to the organization because of the employee’s visibility. For example, it would be inappropriate for an official in charge of elections to be a member of a Facebook group focused on reelecting one candidate or another. Moreover, there are any number of groups dedicated to patently offensive or illegal causes; having accounts associated with these types of groups could bring significant risk to the organization and its brand. ~Another related area involves conveying a perception of approval of content that might be controversial, offensive, or illegal. For example, both a Facebook “like” and retweeting content on Twitter are often perceived as approval of that content. If an official account or the personal account of a senior manager retweets a sexist joke or something that condones illegal drug use, that could also cause serious issues for the organization.
  • Pretty straightforward
  • Here’s an example of this from the Seattle Fire Dept – it clearly says “This site is not monitored. Call 911 for emergencies.” It also notes the applicability of public records laws and has a link to the main website.
  • At this point I’d be pleased to entertain your questions.
  • 20111031 KMWorld 2011 Applying the Social Business Roadmap to Your Organization

    1. 1. Jesse Wilkins, CRM, Information Certified Director, Systems of Engagement AIIM International
    2. 2.  Introduction Review of relevant social technologies and use cases The social business roadmap Applying the social business roadmap to your organization Social media governance 2
    3. 3. 3
    4. 4. Era Mainframe Mini PC Internet ??? Systems of Record 1960- 1975- 1992- 2001- 2010- Years 1975 1992 2001 2009 2015 Typical A A batch A dept A web thing documen ??? trans process pagemanaged t Best Digital known IBM Equipme Microsoft Google ???company ntContent Image Docume Content mgmt Microfilm ??? Mgmt nt Mgmt Mgmt focus 4
    5. 5. Systems of RecordCommand and control Transaction-oriented Data-centric User learns system Security is key issue 5 Source = AIIM and TCG Advisors
    6. 6. “A new class of company isemerging—one that usescollaborative Web 2.0technologies intensively toconnect the internal efforts ofemployees and to extend theorganization’s reach tocustomers, partners, andsuppliers.We call this new kind ofcompany the networkedenterprise.” 6
    7. 7. Systems of Engagement Social and Era Mainframe Mini PC Internet Cloud Systems of Record 1960- 1975- 1992- 2001- 2010- Years 1975 1992 2001 2009 2015 Typical A An A batch A dept A web thing documen interacti trans process pagemanaged t on Best Digital Faceboo known IBM Equipme Microsoft Google kcompany ntContent Social Image Docume Content mgmt Microfilm Business Mgmt nt Mgmt Mgmt focus Systems 7
    8. 8. Systems of Record Systems of Engagement Command and Open and control accessible Transaction- Interaction-oriented orientedDocument-centric User-centric UbiquitousLimited deployment deployment Central IT- Self-provisioned provisioned 8
    9. 9. Consideration Systems of Record Systems of EngagementFocus Transactions InteractionsGovernance Command & Control CollaborationCore Elements Facts & Commitments Ideas & NuancesValue Single Source of Truth Discovery & DialogStandard Accurate & Complete Immediate & AccessibleContent Authored CommunalPrimary Record Type Documents ConversationsSearchability Easy HardUsability User is trained User “knows”Accessibility Regulated & Contained Ad Hoc & OpenRetention Permanent TransientPolicy Focus Security (Protect Assets) Privacy (Protect Users) 9
    10. 10.  Introduction Review of relevant social technologies and use cases The social business roadmap Applying the social business roadmap to your organization Social media governance 10
    11. 11. Blogs 11
    12. 12.  Internal announcements External announcements and press releases Project documentation Knowledge management Any broadcast-type communications 12
    13. 13. Provide project updates 13
    14. 14. Provide organizational updates 14
    15. 15.  “It is part text messaging and part blogging, with the ability to update on your cell phone or computer, but constrained to 140 characters.” -- Ari Herzog, Ariwriter.com 15 15
    16. 16. 16
    17. 17. 17
    18. 18. 18
    19. 19. 19 19
    20. 20. Source: Stewart Mader, www.ikiw.org 20
    21. 21. Create agenda and minutes 21
    22. 22. 22
    23. 23. 23
    24. 24. 24
    25. 25. 25
    26. 26. 26
    27. 27. Keep in touch 27
    28. 28. Network and announce events 28
    29. 29. Share information 29
    30. 30. Find your next job 30
    31. 31. Respond to crises 31
    32. 32. Do answers to questions generally come from expected or unexpected sources? 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% 38% of organizations getAlmost entirely from expected sources half or more of Mostly from expected sources answers from unexpectedEqually from expected and unexpected sources. sources Mostly from unexpected sources Almost entirely from unexpected sources N=90 Q&A users , excl. 22 Don’t Knows 32 ©AIIM 2011
    33. 33. Our open innovation platform has been successful at: (Check all that apply) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 48% have surfaced Coming up with minor changes to our major changes to internal processes internal processes Coming up with major changes to our through their internal processes open innovation Coming up with minor changes to our platform. external offerings Coming up with major changes to our external offerings 34% have come up with major Improving morale changes to external offerings. None of these N=84 Innovation users 33 ©AIIM 2011
    34. 34. Before/after the social infrastructure was in place, how well did/do the Sales andMarketing staff: % of Organizations “Poorly ” or “Very Poorly” 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% Poor sharing of knowledge Share knowledge and information? dropped from Before 41% to 8% After Work together to execute basic Poor working business processes? together dropped fromCommunicate important updates and 21% to 4% new information to each other? N=58 users, “Poorly ” or “Very Poorly” 34 ©AIIM 2011
    35. 35.  Introduction Review of relevant social technologies and use cases The social business roadmap Applying the social business roadmap to your organization Social media governance 35
    36. 36. 36
    37. 37. 37
    38. 38.  Describes steps to implement social business NOT necessarily linear Will vary substantially between organizations 38
    39. 39.  Not a step in the roadmap, but necessary precursor to successful social business initiatives ◦ Transparency ◦ Trust ◦ Technology 39
    40. 40. ◦ Requires that the organization move from a culture of knowledge hoarding to one of knowledge sharing. 40
    41. 41. Requires that the organization trust its users to do whatis right, while supporting them with the training andgovernance required for them to be accountable for thattrust. 41
    42. 42. Requires willingness to allow employees to experimentwith new tools and processes, trusting that they will notabuse them and permitting them to “fail fast.” 42
    43. 43.  Experimental use of technologies “Under the radar” Proof of concept 43
    44. 44.  Formalization of approach Social business assessment Planning and project management Internal marketing and communication Social business team Organization-specific roadmap 44
    45. 45.  Identify desired capabilities and deployment options Procure and implement tools Develop and deliver training and support Build integration 45
    46. 46. Source: Govloop.com 46
    47. 47. 47
    48. 48.  Listen to conversations before jumping into them Look for tone and sentiment Watch for complaints Set up queries and alerts Empower community managers 48
    49. 49. 49
    50. 50. 50
    51. 51.  Seed content into tools Use the tools! Consistent messaging across tools Be patient 51
    52. 52. 52
    53. 53.  Move from listening and broadcasting to engagement Plan for engagement Authenticity and personality key 53
    54. 54. 54
    55. 55.  The US Air Force’s Rules of Engagement for Blogging 55
    56. 56. 56
    57. 57.  Policies and guidelines Restrictions on tools and content Internal monitoring Records management Legal issues 57
    58. 58. 58
    59. 59. 59
    60. 60. 60
    61. 61.  Encourage uptake of the tools Monitor efficacy of tools Measure and analyze tools and processes Identify changes to tools and new tools 61
    62. 62.  Introduction Review of relevant social technologies and use cases The social business roadmap Applying the social business roadmap to your organization Social media governance 62
    63. 63.  Strategy assessment Technology assessment External brand assessment Culture assessment Process assessment Governance assessment 63
    64. 64.  What are the goals and objectives? Who are the stakeholders? What are competitors doing? Who and where are the target audiences? 64
    65. 65.  Is the organization already using social technologies? ◦ Commercial ◦ External ◦ Internal Are there any unofficial/unsanctioned implementations? Are there tools the organization wants to use but isn’t yet? 65
    66. 66.  Are there unofficial accounts in place on commercial services? Are there any undesired accounts in place? ◦ Parody ◦ Complaint Does the organization have a way to monitor sentiment? 66
    67. 67.  Is the organization collaborative, open, and sharing? Are there incentives or disincentives for innovation? Does the organization restrict access to sites? 67
    68. 68.  Do any existing business processes use social technologies? What processes are likely candidates for social business applications? 68
    69. 69.  Is there a social media policy in place? Are employees trained on it? Are there employees with dedicated governance responsibilities? 69
    70. 70. 70
    71. 71.  Introduction Review of relevant social technologies and use cases The social business roadmap Applying the social business roadmap to your organization Social media governance 71
    72. 72. By the end of 2013, half of allcompanies will have been askedto produce material from socialmedia websites for e-discovery. Source: “Social Media Governance: An Ounce ofPrevention”, Gartner 72
    73. 73. Is a Facebook “like” a record? 73
    74. 74. Prohibition is not realistic 74
    75. 75.  Ensures that employees know what is expected of them Provides guidelines for being more effective Reduces risk of someone posting inappropriate content Addresses legal and operational concerns 75
    76. 76.  Determines overall strategic goals of organization Provides support for social media initiative(s) Determines need for policy guidance Determines need for enterprise solutions Supports – or doesn’t – transformation efforts 76
    77. 77.  Governance roles required to ensure compliance with the framework Includes usual suspects… Also includes new roles ◦ Social media strategist ◦ Community managers ◦ Moderators 77
    78. 78.  Social content is just another form of content Policy should provide a framework applicable to most or all social media tools – and to other content/communication- related technologies as well DON’T write a Facebook policy, a Twitter policy, etc. 78
    79. 79. Official vs. unofficialLink to social media policy 79
    80. 80. Creation of official accounts 80
    81. 81.  Account details ◦ User name ◦ Picture ◦ Corporate logo usage ◦ Bio ◦ Contact information Friends/buddies/contacts Groups/fans/likes 81
    82. 82.  Whether posts will require approval Pictures and video ◦ By the organization ◦ By third parties Links (i.e. “sharing”) Applications and widgets Likes, retweets, etc. 82
    83. 83.  Access to personal accounts using organizational resources (time, computers, network, etc.) Access to sites using personal devices (iPhone, tablet, etc.) 83
    84. 84.  Acceptable and unacceptable groups Perception of approval 84
    85. 85.  Offensive content Disparagement of the organization – or of competitors or others Slander or libel Sexual content Solicitations of commerce Threats Illegal activity Violation of copyright 85
    86. 86.  Personnel-related information Financial information Confidential information Health information If you wouldn’t post it to your website or send via email, don’t post to FB or send via Twitter. 86
    87. 87. Monitoring and reviewing comments 87
    88. 88.  Whether the account is monitored for actionable content (screenshot) Public records Monitoring for public safety 88
    89. 89.  Conduct your own social media assessment Review/update/create social media governance framework Develop your own organization-specific roadmap Implement social business effectively, responsibly, and in a way that supports the goals of the business 89
    90. 90. 90
    91. 91. Jesse Wilkins, CRM, Information CertifiedDirector, Systems of EngagementAIIM International +1 (303) 574-0749 direct jwilkins@aiim.org http://www.twitter.com/jessewilkins http://www.linkedin.com/in/jessewilkins http://www.facebook.com/jessewilkins http://www.slideshare.net/jessewilkins 91
    92. 92.  Available under Creative Commons – you can add to and expand www.aiim.org/roadmap 92
    93. 93.  2-day instructor-led or online course Includes: ◦ Specific governance elements for Facebook, Twitter, other social business tools ◦ Commercial vs. enterprise social technologies ◦ Capturing and managing social content Some courses live now, entire program live by Dec 2011 http://www.aiim.org/Training/Essential%20Tr aining/Social-Media/Course%20Descriptions 93
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