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20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages
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20110512-2 ARMA Boston ID and Classify Messages

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This presentation at the 2011 ARMA Boston Spring Seminar described approaches to identifying messages as records and classifying them appropriately.

This presentation at the 2011 ARMA Boston Spring Seminar described approaches to identifying messages as records and classifying them appropriately.

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  • Each part of each organization needs to know what it should save. This will be different for accounting vs. sales vs. engineering vs. management vs. etc. etc. etc.
  • Each part of each organization needs to know what it should save. This will be different for accounting vs. sales vs. engineering vs. management vs. etc. etc. etc.
  • At this point I’d be pleased to entertain your questions.
  • Transcript

    • 1. ARMA Boston Spring Seminar 2011<br />Jesse Wilkins, CRM<br />Identifying and Classifying Messages as Records<br />
    • 2. When is a message a record?<br />Exercise 1 – Determining Records<br />Classifying Messages<br />Autoclassification<br />Session Agenda<br />
    • 3. When is a message a record?<br />
    • 4. When defined by statute or regulation<br />When it documents a business transaction<br />When it supports a business decision<br />When it is the only evidence of something<br />When the attachment is the record<br />When it’s important to the organization**<br />When is an email a record?<br />
    • 5. May need to capture….<br />Messages themselves<br />Attachments<br />Read receipts<br />Bounced messages<br />All of these could be records<br />Capturing email records<br />
    • 6. Many also need to capture….<br />Calendar items and appointments<br />Task items<br />Notes<br />Contacts<br />Capturing other information objects<br />
    • 7. Transitory messages that are not timely<br />Personal messages unrelated to business<br />“Me-too” messages<br />Messages already <br /> captured by someone<br />Emails that are not captured<br />
    • 8. Exercise: Identifying Records<br />
    • 9. Classifying messages<br />
    • 10. Users drag messages into folders<br />Folder structure may be controlled…or not<br />Organizational taxonomy<br />Records retention schedule structure<br />Departmental file plan<br />Whatever users want to do!<br />Manually into folders<br />
    • 11.
    • 12. Pros:<br />Users understand what the messages are about<br />Users most likely to be the ones who need to access them again<br />Cons:<br />Volume!<br />Inconsistency over time<br />Inconsistency between users<br />Manually into folders<br />
    • 13. Classification of messages that meet certain rules<br />Otherwise similar to manual classification<br />Automated, using rules<br />
    • 14. Newer approach to classification<br />Tags are applied to the messages<br />Also called labels or categories<br />Can be applied manually or automatically<br />Messages can have more than one tag<br />And can be combined with folders as well <br />Tags can be searched on or used for filtering<br />Tagging <br />
    • 15. Tagged messages in Outlook<br />
    • 16. Pros:<br />Message can be classified into multiple “buckets”<br />Visual cues (color)<br />Dynamic searches <br />Cons:<br />Same as with manual classification into folders<br />Tagging<br />
    • 17. Autoclassification<br />
    • 18. Takes the responsibility for classification out of users’ hands<br />Better able to address volume email presents<br />May be more consistent than users<br />Benefits of automatic classification<br />
    • 19. Rules-based<br />Example: all messages from certain users<br />Rules applied at the server, not the client<br />Content analysis<br />Each message<br />All messages in a folder <br />All messages for a given user<br />Approaches to automatic classification<br />
    • 20. Autoclassification is not 100% accurate<br />Concept analysis is difficult for computers – see e.g. spam<br />Different messages may have different value depending on context<br />We are not very good at using email<br />Issues with autoclassification<br />
    • 21. Recognize that it is not 100% accurate<br />Some human interaction will still be required<br />Consider systems that “auto-suggest”<br />Train users on how to construct subject lines and messages effectively<br />Considerations for autoclassification<br />
    • 22. Manual approach<br />Can be improved with autosuggest<br />Good balance of cognitive burden, operational considerations<br />3-zone approach to classification<br />Inbox zone<br />Working zone<br />Records zone<br />
    • 23. Messages that have just been received<br />And perhaps not read yet<br />Transitory messages<br />Personal or non-business-related messages<br />“Bacn”<br />Keep these messages for short periods, e.g. 30 or 60 days<br />Then auto-delete or auto-migrate<br />Inbox zone<br />
    • 24. Messages that have been read but require more time to respond effectively<br />Messages related to ongoing projects or initiatives<br />Reference-type messages<br />Keep these messages longer but still a defined period, e.g. 180 days or 1 year<br />Then auto-delete or auto-migrate<br />Working zone<br />
    • 25. Messages that rise to the level of records<br />Ideally these are not stored in the messaging application or folders – they are moved into an ERM system<br />Retention is defined by the content of the message and its value to the organization<br />Records zone<br />
    • 26. Questions?<br />

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