Food Security Strategy Presentation to the 65th Annual Hawaii Farm Bureau Federation Convention
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Food Security Strategy Presentation to the 65th Annual Hawaii Farm Bureau Federation Convention

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This project was undertaken to implement the 2010 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) which in part called for increased food and energy self-sufficiency. The project also carries......

This project was undertaken to implement the 2010 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) which in part called for increased food and energy self-sufficiency. The project also carries out the New Day Plan which supports increased food self-sufficiency. Three reports were prepared with the assistance of grant funding from the Economic Development Administration (EDA). The Increased Food Security and Food Self-Sufficiency Strategy (Strategy) sets forth objectives, policies and actions to increase the amount of locally grown food consumed by Hawaii residents. The Strategy is a living document intended as a first step toward continued dialog and implementation. Volume II is entitled A History of Agriculture in Hawaii and Technical Reference Document. It examines the history of agriculture in Hawaii from the 1960s to the present, with a focus on the transition from plantation agriculture to diversified agriculture. Volume II also contains background information and serves as a resource base for the Strategy. Volume III is entitled Assessment of Irrigation Systems in Hawaii. It provides an assessment of the general status and needs of agricultural irrigation systems owned by the State of Hawaii. It provides estimated costs for rehabilitation and maintenance of these systems. Volume III also includes a summary of the economic impact of several inventoried agricultural irrigation systems.

For more information and to download the plan, visit http://hawaii.gov/dbedt/op/special_plans.htm.

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  • CEDS and New Day Plan Slide 4CEDS calls for more food self-sufficiency and food security. This project has been undertaken to implement the 2010 CEDS by developing a strategy for increased food security/self-sufficiency for Hawaii. New Day Plan aims to: Preserve and start growing on agricultural lands.Repair irrigation systems that are underutilized or structurally unsound.Develop integrated agricultural, environmental, and cultural education programs.Lower the cost of farming for community-based entrepreneurs.Raise the supply of local food.Raise the demand for local food.Support individual participation through storm water recapture and community, school and family gardens
  • The project has been conducted with the assistance of and in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture-- the lead agency for the promotion and development of agriculture in the State.
  • JobsThe EDA’s focus is on jobs and economic development. Agriculture is an important sector in Hawaii’s economy.Acknowledge Gail Fujita, Hawaii EDA representative who will be in the audience.
  • Hawaii is located approximately 2,506 miles from the continental United States. About 85-90% of Hawaii’s food is imported which makes it particularly vulnerable to natural disasters and global event that might disrupt shipping and the food supply.
  • OmniTrak is a market research and planning firm in the Asia-Pacific area. Ulupono Initiative hired Honolulu market research specialist OmniTrak to conduct a detailed study entitled Local Food Market Demand Study of Oahu Shoppers.Analyzed local food purchasing decisionsThe study determined that Hawaii residents are willing to pay more for locally grown produce but that they have difficulty in identifying such products in the market.  Expansion of branding and labeling programs such as the Hawaii Seal of Quality will help to identify locally grown foods for consumers.  Evaluated attitudes about six local foods faced with import competition **Not from INCREASED FOOD SECURITY AND FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY STRATEGY. Taken from Ulupono study **Six foods include:Milk, eggs, bananas, tomatoes, romaine lettuce and beef (rib-eye steak).Key findings include:When asked if the amount of food grown in Hawaii is too little, about right or too much, 81% said too little, according to the report.Hawaii consumers spend only about 8% of their food budget on locally grown food, while they spend the rest on imports, (Source: 2005/2008 U.S. Department of Agriculture).Nearly 74% of consumers believe that it is very important that Hawaii grow its own local foods.Consumers across Oahu strongly believe local food is important, they don’t think there’s enough available; and they are willing to pay more for local food. Price is important but not the only thing. Freshness as well as trust in local businesses are also important. Being locally grown was most often the second or third most important quality that consumers mentioned.  OmniTrack Group. Local Food Market Demand Study of Oahu Shoppers, December 2011.
  • The economic impact of food import replacement is significant. Replacing just 10% of the food we currently import would amount to approximately $313 million. Assuming a 30% farm share, $94 million would be realized at the farm-gate which would generate an economy-wide impact of an additional $188 million in sales, $47 million in earnings, $6 million in state tax revenues, and more than 2,300 jobs.
  • Locally grown foods result in a smaller carbon foot-print by reducing “food miles” involved in transporting foods. Reduces introduction of invasive speciesImported foods run the risk of carrying invasive species that may negatively affect Hawaii’s eco-systems. The unwelcome introduction of fruit flies, miconia trees, coqui frogs, red fire ants and varroa mites have severe consequences beyond agriculture and require millions in public dollars to fund eradication or containment programs.
  • Increases local tax baseAssuming a 30% farm share, $94 million would be realized at the farm-gate which would generate an economy-wide impact of an additional $188 million in sales, $47 million in earnings, $6 million in state tax revenuesMultiplier effects create jobs and develop other economiesIn addition to economic benefits, 2,300 jobs will be created.
  • The State of Hawaii has prepared a Strategy to increase food security and food self-sufficiency. This will increase food self-sufficiency which is a component of food security.
  • The Strategy concentrates on food self-sufficiency and does not cover agriculture in general.The Strategy does not attempt to set a percentage goal for food self-sufficiency, but an overall direction towards increased food self-sufficiency.The Strategy does not address how much land is needed for food self-sufficiency, but identifies actions and projects to provide more land for food commodities.The Strategy is a living document which provides a first step for continued dialog and the initiation of actions to increase food self-sufficiency and food security in Hawaii.
  • Considering an emphasis on “Eating Local” within the Buy Local It Matters campaign.
  • Support the Buy Local, It Matters market campaignMarketing is critical to increasing the demand for and consumption of Hawaii’s locally produced agricultural commodities and products.  DOA operates the Buy Local/ It Matters campaign that encourages residents to support Hawaii farmers by buying locally grown produce. The campaign is supported by funds from the USDA specialty crop assistance program and other grants.  Buy Local It MattersAmount spent to date on the campaign = $120K cash, $60K in kind for a total of $180KAdvertisements in print, television, radio and live demos.Most Supermarkets have a “Locally Grown” sectionZippy’s also has a “Buy Local, It Matters” campaignSupermarket ads show the “Island Fresh” symbol to designate locally grown.Expand branding and labeling programs to identify local foodsExpansion of branding and labeling programs such as the Hawaii Seal of Quality will help to identify locally grown foods for consumers. Seals of QualityNumber of SOQ members have grown from 12 in 2006 to 57 now13.6 million labels sold as of June 20128 SOQ events completed in 2012 so far Support local marketing campaigns to publicize farmer’s marketsFarmers’ markets are an important venue for local farmers and increases access to locally grown foods as well.Farmers Markets are proliferating all across the state with 109 farmers’ markets with locations, dates, and times listed on the DOA website. http://hawaii.gov/hdoa/add/farmers-market-in-hawaii/farmers-market-listingOahu – 61Big Island – 26Kauai – 12Maui - 10
  • Establish a pilot program in the charter schoolsThe Farm-to-School Program in Hawaii provides a new large and stable market for local produce. However, because of requirements for equitable access to food, all 256 public schools need to be equitably supplied. On the other hand, Hawaii’s charter schools have flexibility and are designed to be more locally and community-based. The charter schools provide a good platform to pilot or demonstrate a Hawaii Farm to School Program. Continue the fresh fruit and vegetables program in the schoolsThe Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) is a nationwide school lunch program administered in Hawaii by the DOE to provide student access to nutritious meals in elementary schools. FFVP also provides a market for local produce. The program is funded by the Federal Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The FY11-12 operating budget for this program was $1.9 million. School gardens are part of an effort to connect people with farms and farming. Currently, food grown in school gardens can’t be used in school cafeterias because there are no food safety standards for these gardens. DOA can support school gardens by developing food safety standards for school gardens.Adopt a state policyA general statement of State policy expressed in the Hawaii State Plan, HRS Chapter 226, will help to encourage schools, hospitals and correctional institutions as well as residents and visitors to buy local produce and support local farmers.Amend the Hawaii State Plan to encourage schools, hospitals, and correctional institutions as well as the public to buy local
  • Good Agricultural PracticesThere is a need to expand Hawaii’s Good Agriculture Practices (GAP) programs. Many food vendors require GAP certification for market entry, yet many small-scale farms (unlike many of the larger farms in Hawaii) do not have GAP certification because they do not wish to change established farming practices. Create a task force to discuss and create guidelines for Good Ag PracticesIncrease farm food safety coaching program The College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) at the University of Hawaii offers a free-of-charge food safety coaching program for local food production operations. The program prepares fruit and vegetable producers for GAP certification. The coaching program operates on a grant-funded annual budget of approximately $200,000 through the University of Hawaii. Augment the farm food safety coaching program by providing for translation services
  • Land, water, and distribution infrastructureComplete existing ag parks and develop new ag parksOne of the fundamental problems affecting farmers is the lack of access to land with long-term leases. The “impermanence syndrome” describes the accelerated agricultural decline near urban areas due to farmers’ disinvestment in their farm operations in anticipation of development. One way to address this is to make more public land available for agriculture. The Agricultural Parks Program utilizes a thorough qualification process to ensure potential lessees will undertake substantial agricultural activity. There are twelve Agricultural Parks managed by DOA and the Agribusiness Development Corporation (ADC) on Kauai, Oahu, Molokai and Hawaii. Lease rents in agricultural parks are lower than privately owned lands.Complete the transfer of ag lands from DLNR to DOAAct 90 SLH 2003 established the non-agricultural park lands program which provides for the transfer of certain public lands from the Department of Land Natural Resources to the Department of Agriculture. The Board of Land and Natural Resources (BLNR) approved 5,186.843 acres for transfer and the transfer of 4,072.783 acres has been completed.Anticipate 144 parcels (49,707 acres) remaining to be transferred to DOA as part of the non-ag parks program.Integrate agricultural infrastructure in regions with state agricultural land Communication with DLNR August 31, 2012.
  • Capital Improvement Project(CIP) FundingThe state operates eleven irrigation systems throughout the state. By maintaining and operating these abandoned plantation irrigation systems, the state supports the development of diversified ag on former plantation lands. There is also a need to incorporate improvements, such as hydroelectric facilities, that would help reduce farm expenses.13 contracts are actively being carried out resulting in $30.3 million in projects largely to improve the various irrigation systems vital to improving access to water for agricultural endeavors.AWUDPAn update to the State Agriculture Water Use and Development Plan (AWUDP) is needed.  This would be led by DOA/CWRM. $1 million has been appropriated and allotted for FY12 but we are still awaiting the allotment of the FY13 appropriation also of $1 million.
  • Such as food hubs/food incubators“Food hubs” facilitate the aggregation, storage, processing, distribution, and/or marketing of locally/regionally produced food products. In Hawaii, a similar concept called a “food incubator” has been proposed. These incubators would be facilities that handle aggregation, processing, treatment and distribution. They could be located either near farms (e.g. Kunia) or near harbors or airports. Food incubators also address storage issues resulting from homeland security measures which do not allow agricultural storage sheds on piers. Working with the private sector in the development of a veterans to farmer program. A comprehensive program that will incorporate alternative energy creation from agricultural waste, a farmer incubation program, and purchase contracts to provide a stable revenue stream with the end product being a self-sustaining 21st century agricultural economic model.Food safety and farmers’ marketsFacilitate farmer participation in farmers’ markets by working non-profit organization such as the Farm Bureau to help farmers meet food safety requirements.CSA (Community Supported Agriculture)Encourage and promote community-supported agriculture (CSA) by including information on CSAs in existing marketing activities.
  • Provide an adequate supply of trained laborCreate greater awareness and improve public interest in and support of the agriculture and natural resource management career fields.Develop more effective partnerships between industry and academia, and use those partnerships to recruit and prepare more students.Improve the preparedness of students in agriculture and natural resource management programs.Provide agricultural training at the secondary and post-secondary school levels and propose improvements as needed.Continue Green Jobs Program“Green Jobs Initiative” provides workforce development services for the agricultural, energy, natural resources and related industries.Workforce trainingJoint effort with DLIR to host Agricultural Skills Panel Workshops at 5 sites across the state reaching out to over 600 participants in the agricultural communityLegislative and administrative actions were recommended for both DLIR and DOA (recommendations for DOA did not really focus on ag workforce but ag issues in general and are covered in our overall proposals) including:DLIR to support agricultural education pathway programs through mentorships and On-the-Job-Training – Vet to Farmer Program to serve as an exampleCatalogue of available ag related training programs developed by DLIRDOA website to serve as central hub for ag information with an update slated for January in line with efforts of State CIO
  • Identify critical research and extension needs and prioritize the budgetary and academic resources required to address these needsWork with CTAHR to conduct more studies on local agricultural issuesCTAHR’s effects on Hawaii’s food security and self-sufficiency are significant and extensive. Its research and extension programs must continue to support the detection and control of invasive pests and food-borne pathogens, protection of water quality and watersheds, ensuring the safety of foods, and increasing the quantity and quality of foods produced in Hawai‘i.Support for research through the barrel taxPBARC research for new disease resistant anthurium cultivarsPBARC research for algae/fungi to produce biofuels from papaya or albizia
  • Support pest prevention, control, and managementThe USDA Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center (PBARC) in Hilo, Hawaii conducts research for the development of sustainable agricultural systems and pest management programs in support of Hawaii, the Pacific Basin, and U.S. agriculture. Provide a state dedicated source of fundingDOA’s pest control, plant quarantine and other bio-security programs work to prevent, control and manage these pests. Stable funding support is needed for their researchers, technicians and inspectors. Pest management programs supported through the barrel tax$200,000 to go to CBB task force for research and control of CBBSupport for chemical/mechanical applications to control fireweed and little fire ant
  • Have Legislation Adopted in 2013 Session to Fund and Establish the Agricultural Development and Food Security ProgramDOA is the lead/assisting organization. Evaluate the feasibility of alternative sources of funding, such as the Environmental Response, Energy and Food Security Tax (Barrel Tax). Total budget estimate for FY13-14 is $3.17 million. Total budget estimate for FY14-15 is $4.0 million. Agricultural Development and Food Security Special Fund is DOA’s portion of barrel tax
  • Collect data and provide market researchThe Market Analysis and News (MAN) Branch of the DOA conducted economic, market, and business feasibility research on fruits, vegetables, and shell egg shipments, as well as supply and wholesale prices. In 2009 all positions in the Market Analysis and News (MAN) Branch of the DOA were eliminated. MAN published over 500 Hawaii Agricultural Market and News Reports annually. Funds of $179,164 annually are required in FB 2013 – 2015 for three new support positions and needed equipment to perform the required market research and reports. Food Security Metrics System in partnership with Ulupono Initiative.Looking to restructure MAN to have a clear vision and direction and use potential vacant positions to restart the division.Publish ag statistical dataThe Statistics of Hawaii Agriculture publication compiles data on a broader variety of agricultural commodities for the State of Hawaii than the Hawaii Agricultural Market and News Report. The Statistics of Hawaii Agriculture publication was eliminated in 2009 and reinstated in 2010. Funds of $400,815 are required in FB 2013 – 2015 for six new support positions and equipment to perform the required data gathering.Provide Policy, Legislative and Advocacy Support for AgricultureFor example, the UDSA specialty crop assistance program under the U.S. Farm Bill has provided funding of approximately $250,000 per year for five years to increase the competitiveness of specialty crops such as papaya and lilikoi in Hawaii. Communication with Federal agencies and policy makers will help to insure the continuation of programs that benefit Hawaii agriculture.The USDA Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center (PBARC) in Hilo, Hawaii conducts research for the development of sustainable agricultural systems and pest management programs in support of Hawaii, the Pacific Basin, and U.S. agriculture.
  • Partnerships can help support all aspects of the local food system. Opportunities to develop and expand public-private partnerships exist in many areas including but not limited to the following: Rehabilitation and ongoing maintenance and management of irrigation systems;Acquisition and management of agricultural lands; Distribution facilities; Marketing of local food products; Internships and training; andDiscussion of metrics to measure Hawaii food self-sufficiency. IAL designationLivestock Feed Feasibility Pilot Project – partner with Oceanic Institute and other partners to build a pilot feed mill on Big Island. - Initial workshop was held on August 15, 2012 bringing together ranchers, farmers, biofuels producers, academia, etc.

Transcript

  • 1. PRESENTATION TO HAWAII FARM BUREAU FEDERATION CONVENTION October 31, 2012Russell Kokubun, Director, Department of AgricultureJesse Souki, Director, Office of PlanningDepartment of Business, Economic Development & Tourism
  • 2. THE INCREASED FOOD SECURITY AND FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY STRATEGY Office of PlanningDepartment of Business, Economic Development & Tourism and Hawaii State Department of Agriculture
  • 3. PRESENTATION OUTLINE Background of the Strategy Importance of Food Self-Sufficiency Presentation of the Strategy Conclusion/Contacts for Further Info 3
  • 4. BACKGROUND TO THE STRATEGY The Office of Planning is the lead for the Hawaii Statewide CEDS  Governor‟s “A New Day Plan” 4
  • 5. BACKGROUND TO THE STRATEGY con’t… State Department of Agriculture is the lead agency for agriculture in Hawaii 5
  • 6. BACKGROUND TO THE STRATEGY con’t… Funded by a grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA), U.S. Department of Commerce Jobs Economic Development 6
  • 7. WHY IS FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY IMPORTAN Between 85% to 90% of Hawaii‟s food is imported Hawaii‟s food supply is vulnerable to natural disasters and global events 7
  • 8. WHY IS FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY IMPORTAN The Ulupono Initiative and OmniTrak Group market study: “Local Food Market Demand Study of O„ahu Shoppers” Analyzed local food purchasing decisions Evaluated attitudes about six local foods faced with import competition 8
  • 9. WHY IS FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY IMPORTAN Economic impact of food import replacement is great  Replacing 10% of the food we import would amount to $313 million dollars in local spending  Will keep money circulating in the State 9
  • 10. WHY IS FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY IMPORTAN Helps conserve energy involved in transporting food  Reduces transportation costs added to food Reduces introduction of invasive species 10
  • 11. HOW DOES INCREASED FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY BENEFITYOU?  Fresh, healthy food will be more available and accessible  Helps Hawaii‟s economy  Increases local tax base  Multiplier effects create jobs and develop other economies 11
  • 12. STRATEGIES Purpose: The State of Hawaii has prepared a Strategy to increase food security and food self-sufficiency 12
  • 13. STRATEGIES con’t… Overall Goal: Increase the amount of locally grown food consumed by residents of Hawaii The Strategy is a living document for continued dialog 13
  • 14. THREE STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES INCREASE DEMAND FOR AND ACCESS TO LOCALLY GROWN FOOD INCREASE PRODUCTION OF LOCALLY GROWN FOODS PROVIDE POLICY AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT TO MEET FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY NEEDS 14
  • 15. THREE STRATEGIC OBJECTIVEScon’t…This diagram illustrates the pathway from the Objective: Demand; to the Policy:Increased Marketing; to the Action: Support the Buy Local It Matters MarketingProgram. OBJECTIVE POLICY ACTIONS Buy Local It Matters In-Store Marketing Promotions Promote Increase Farmer‟s Demand Markets Branding Seal of Quality 15
  • 16. OVERALL ORGANIZATION OF STUDY Organizational Chart GOAL Increased Food Self-Sufficiency ISSUES Lack of Awareness, Access, Land , Water, Energy , Labor, Research, Distribution, Food Safety, Federal Budget, Organization, Support Svs. OBJECTIVE OBJECTIVE OBJECTIVE Increase Provide Policy Increase Demand Production Support POLICY POLICY POLICY POLICY POLICY POLICY POLICY POLICY Institutional Use Land / Water Labor/ Research/ Organizational Market Info Federal Marketing Distribution Workforce Extension Serv. Structure Laws, Programs ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS ACTIONS 16
  • 17. OBJECTIVE 1: INCREASE DEMAND FOR AND ACCESS TO LOCALLYGROWN FOOD  Support the Buy Local, It Matters market campaign  Expand branding and labeling programs to identify local foods  Support local marketing campaigns to publicize farmer‟s markets 17
  • 18. OBJECTIVE 1: INCREASE DEMAND FOR AND ACCESS TO LOCALLYGROWN FOOD con’t…  Encourage public institutions to buy locally grown foods • Establish a pilot program in the charter schools • Continue the fresh fruit and vegetables program in the schools • Adopt a state policy 18
  • 19. OBJECTIVE 1: INCREASE DEMAND FOR AND ACCESS TO LOCALLYGROWN FOOD con’t…  Increase access to markets by providing farm food safety assistance • Encourage Good Agricultural Practices • Increase farm food safety coaching program • Increase the number of farm food safety certifiers • Augment the farm food safety coaching program by providing for translation services 19
  • 20. OBJECTIVE 2: INCREASE PRODUCTION OF LOCALLY GROWNFOODS  Land, water, and distribution infrastructure  Complete existing ag parks and develop new ag parks ○ DOA actively manages 7,786 acres serving 317 tenants through its ag park and non-ag park programs.  Complete the transfer of ag lands from DLNR to DOA.  Integrate agricultural infrastructure in regions with state agricultural land.  Important Agricultural Land designation is now protecting 89,859 acres of land. 20
  • 21. OBJECTIVE 2: INCREASE PRODUCTION OF LOCALLY GROWN FOODScon’t…  Maintain and repair ag irrigation systems • CIP funding • AWUDP 21
  • 22. OBJECTIVE 2: INCREASE PRODUCTION OF LOCALLY GROWN FOODScon’t…  Develop efficient distribution systems and facilities  Such as food hubs/food incubators  Food safety and farmers‟ markets  CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) 22
  • 23. OBJECTIVE 2: INCREASE PRODUCTION OF LOCALLY GROWN FOODScon’t…  Workforce training  Provide an adequate supply of trained labor ○ Create greater awareness of careers in ag and natural resource management ○ Encourage students at CTAHR to pursue business education ○ Develop more effective partnerships between industry and academia ○ Provide agricultural training at the secondary and post-secondary levels  Continue Green Jobs Program 23
  • 24. OBJECTIVE 2: INCREASE PRODUCTION OF LOCALLY GROWN FOODScon’t…  Research extension  Identify critical research and extension needs and prioritize the budgetary and academic resources required to address these needs  Generate research and disseminate information related to farmer to consumer food chain. 24
  • 25. OBJECTIVE 2: INCREASE PRODUCTION OF LOCALLY GROWN FOODScon’t…  Pest management  Support pest prevention, control, and management  Provide a stable dedicated source of funding 25
  • 26. OBJECTIVE 3. PROVIDE POLICY AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT TOMEET FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY NEEDS  Have Legislation Adopted in 2013 Session to Fund and Establish the Agricultural Development and Food Security Program 26
  • 27. OBJECTIVE 3. PROVIDE POLICY AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT TOMEET FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY NEEDS 27
  • 28. OBJECTIVE 3. PROVIDE POLICY AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT TOMEET FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY NEEDS con’t…  Restore Market Research, Information and Statistics Programs to Track Progress Toward Food Self-Sufficiency • Collect data and conduct market research • Publish ag statistical data  Provide Policy, Legislative and Advocacy Support for Agriculture 28
  • 29. OBJECTIVE 3. PROVIDE POLICY AND ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPORT TOMEET FOOD SELF-SUFFICIENCY NEEDS con’t…  Develop Partnerships to Support Food Self-Sufficiency 29
  • 30. CONCLUSION Comments to: Food.SelfSufficiency.Strategy@dbedt.hawaii.gov Implementation by DOA:  Legislative and Administrative Action  Participate in Developing Food Metrics  Accessibility to Information ○ Website development ○ FAQ‟s 30
  • 31. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION… The Increased Food Security and Food Self-Sufficiency Strategy may be found at http://hawaii.gov/dbedt/op/special_plans.htm This report is a summary of Volume I of a three part report. Volume II is entitled A History of Agriculture in Hawaii and Volume III is entitled Assessment of Irrigation Systems in Hawaii Office of Planning Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism And Department of Agriculture State of Hawaii Funded by U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration Award Number 07 69 06658 31