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Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
Playing with Science
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Playing with Science

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Science and the Young Child …

Science and the Young Child
This is a resource about how Neurology and Play are incorporated into developmentally appropriate science activities utilizing the essential questioning skills of scientific inquiry in young children.

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  • “[Children] integrate theory and data in ways that are startlingly vigorous and precise and quantifiable.” -MIT lady
  • CHOCOLATE EXPERIMENT fruit juice density http://inspirationlaboratories.com/preschool-science-experiments/offering opportunities to practice the skills of curiosity, focusing attention, seeking information, and making connections to previously acquired knowledge. Successfully guiding students through the scientific process allows self-efficacy to build by providing an environment where students can be intrinsically rewarded by their ability to build knowledge that includes answers to questions based in genuine curiosity. “memorable and emotionally satisfying” way (Harlan et al. 2012). University of Oregon Brain Development LabLaura Shultz, MIT
  • Dr. Ken Ginsberg, Pediatrician and Child Development Researcher, Children’s Hospital Philadelphia, Boston Children’s Museum“Play is essential to the social, emotional, cognitive, and physical wellbeing of children beginning in early childhood.”
  • *United Nations commission for Human Rights of the Child, Nov 1989cortisol, the hormone released when we are stressed, actually hampers our ability to retain information. “Boredom, dislike or frustration can diminish learning…”
  • DynamicPlay can support emotional and mental health. “Play is essential to the social, emotional, cognitive, and physical wellbeing of children beginning in early childhood.”Play supports emotional and mental health across multiple intelligences:
  • Transcript

    • 1. Playing with Science
    • 2. Play a nd Lea rning “Play is the highest form of research.” — Albert Einstein
    • 3. “To develop the area of the brain responsible for higher-order thinking, children need to have rich experiences that stimulate all of their senses. For a child, play is a critical path to those experiences that engage their senses and provide the foundation for future learning.” -Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Professor of psychology, Temple University -
    • 4. “[Children] integrate theory and data in ways that are startlingly vigorous and precise and quantifiable.” -Laura Shultz, MIT, Boston Children's Museum Spontaneous Play Promotes: o Curiosity o Focused attention o Brain plasticity o Ability to seek information o Healthy Brain architecture -University of Oregon Brain Development Lab Play in learning allows students to gain knowledge in “memorable and emotionally satisfying” ways. (Harlan et al. 2012)
    • 5. Play a nd Hea lth “Understand that play is the work of childhood… We have to invest in childhood and recognize that it is a unique time…that sets up the next generation.” – Dr. Ken Ginsberg, Pediatrician and Child Development Researcher, Children’s Hospital Philadelphia, Boston Children’s Museum
    • 6. Play is so essential to the healthy development of children that the United Nations recognized that Play is a Human Right that each child on earth is entitled to.
    • 7. Play supports emotional and mental health across multiple intelligences: Linguistic { conversation, social scripts} Bodily-kinesthetic { how my body moves} Intrapersonal { what I know about me} Interpersonal { what I know about us} Spatial { how I fit in the world} Musical connects brain hemispheres, exercises language centers in the brain) Logical/Mathematical more or less, bigger or smaller Naturalist {Can we go outside?} Play supports emotional and mental health across multiple intelligences:
    • 8. Play and Language Development “The more words they hear when they are very very young, the faster and more fully their language develops.” –Betty Bardige, Boston Children’s Museum
    • 9. Play is a great place to learn new words! Infants Talk a lot, the more they hear the more they learn basics of conversation and communication Peek-a-boo Imitating sounds and smiles Silly questions Toddlers Play allows a toddler to try new words and experience new situations and the vocabulary that accompanies them Silly songs-simple concepts Movement games-body parts, action words Pretend play- baby dolls, doctor, farmer, fireman Active play- names of places and actions Preschool and Kindergarten Cooperative play Through play kids learn new words from each other and build productive play on each others ideas. Wordplay, songs, story telling- Foundation for reading Dramatic play- Social scripts, imaginary conversation
    • 10. Play and Social Emotional Development Explorative play allows children to develop: o Focus and self control o Perspective taking o Communicating o Making connections o Critical thinking o Taking on challenges o Self directed, engaged learning -Ellen Galinsky, Author Mind in the Making, Boston Children’s Museum
    • 11. Play and Creativity “Play is not Anarchy. Play has rules, especially when it’s group play. When kids play tea party or cops and robbers they’re following a script that they’ve agreed to. And it’s this code negotiation that leads to productive play.” – T i m B r o w n , D e s i g n e r, T E D Ta l k , C r e a t i v i t y a n d P l a y
    • 12. Play and Cultural Differences “It is widely accepted that group play serves as an initiation into a wider cultural life, critical to future success, academically and professionally.” -Boston Children’s Museum
    • 13. Incorporating Science in Play! • GO OUTSIDE! – Take walks, spend time in nature. Point out interesting things as you explore nature together – Answer questions your child may have honestly. Don’t be afraid to include scientific language “why is the sky blue” is one of these great questions, not to be ignored. – Observation is the foundation of the scientific theory. Validate your child’s observations and expand on their ideas.
    • 14. Incorporating Science into Play “…strive to provide a rich environment that stimulates children’s natural curiosity and creativity.”- Boston Children’s Museum • This doesn’t mean that you need to go buy a bunch of science toys. • Represent the real world in your child’s play area. Swapping out items from around the house every so often can help your child create new play scenarios with new experiences and vocabulary. • Create science experiments with your children- The internet is full of great ideas. Your child’s teachers are also a good resource for easy to do and inexpensive home experiments.
    • 15. Incorporating Science into Play Extend your child’s knowledge of the world around them. Visit new parks, zoo’s, museums, and performances. Use new words often and try not to assume your child won’t understand a word or concept because it’s new. Discuss new experiences and phenomenon with your children, prompting them to reflect and value their observations.
    • 16. Sources Power of Play Boston Children’s museum http://www.bostonchildr ensmuseum.org/power- of-play Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, Professor of psychology, Temple University Laura Shultz, MIT, Boston Children's Museum Dr. Ken Ginsberg, Pediatrician and Child Development Researcher, Children’s Hospital Philadelphia, Boston Children’s Museum Betty Bardige, Boston Children’s Museum Tim Brown, Designer, TED Talk, Creativity and Play Ellen Galinsky, Author Mind in the Making, Boston Children’s Museum Harlan et al Harlan, Jean D. and Mary S. Rivkin. Science Experiences for the Early Childhood Years. Tenth Edition. Upper Saddle River: Pearson, 2012. p.19

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