Heather Hanson, Brooklyn Junior Jessica Crooker, North View
Objectives
 
Don’t forget: You can copy-paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize the poll.
How To Vote via Texting <ul><li>Standard texting rates only (worst case US $0.20) </li></ul><ul><li>We have no access to y...
How To Vote via Poll4.com Capitalization doesn’t matter, but spaces and spelling do TIP EXAMPLE
How To Vote via Twitter <ul><li>Capitalization doesn’t matter, but spaces and spelling do </li></ul><ul><li>Since @poll is...
 
<ul><li>“ Despite these  challenges , to truly prepare students to be substantive  thinkers  and democratic  citizens , we...
Why Inquiry? <ul><li>Engage students in reading content-related texts </li></ul><ul><li>Offer choice to increase “buy in” ...
Instructional opportunities… <ul><ul><li>Gather relevant information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluate source reliabilit...
 
Overview of an Inquiry Cycle <ul><li>Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Shared text...
Establishing Background Knowledge  & Activate Prior Knowledge invite curiosity, build background, find topics Teacher Stud...
<ul><li>Read the passage. </li></ul><ul><li>Employ any reading strategies you would normally use. </li></ul><ul><li>A shor...
Why Cold Reading is Often a Bad Idea  Gallagher (2006) <ul><li>“ The Procedure”  (Bransford/McCarrell, 1974) </li></ul><ul...
Answers <ul><li>1.) Mistake </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Pile </li></ul><ul><li>3.) The procedure being described in this passage...
Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge
Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge
<ul><li>“… the prime determinant of understanding is  prior knowledge . Period, point blank, case closed.” </li></ul><ul><...
Why… How… <ul><li>Lay a foundation for continued learning </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of BK/PK = no understanding </li></ul><ul...
 
Shared text & Comprehension Strategies  develop questions, search for information/answers Teacher Students Flood students ...
“ Saved by the Deep”  by Rick Reilly Shared text & comprehension strategies
Collaboration, Participation, Accountability <ul><li>Benefits of Small Group Work </li></ul><ul><li>Lifelike; generate ene...
Small-group discussion <ul><li>Discussion Directions: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Golden Lines (5 minutes) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Small-group discussion <ul><li>3. Further Inquiry—Closing the Discussion (3-5 minutes) </li></ul><ul><li>As a group, come ...
Hypothesis:  Collaborative teams consistently  out-perform individuals  <ul><li>You will need: </li></ul><ul><li>scratch p...
Directions for Facilitator <ul><li>Ten seconds to look at letters </li></ul><ul><li>First time all alone </li></ul><ul><li...
Possible answers to  “Teams That Work” <ul><li>Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Divided work </li></ul><ul><li>Clear expectati...
<ul><li>G </li></ul><ul><li>DMR </li></ul><ul><li>VXKBQ </li></ul><ul><li>TFICZYN </li></ul><ul><li>LPEWSJXA </li></ul>
<ul><li>“… [we] need to  explicitly   teach students how to successfully interact  with one another and also how to reflec...
Accountability <ul><li>Research notebooks </li></ul><ul><li>During reading activities </li></ul><ul><li>Artifacts/evidence...
 
Investigation & Gathering Information intensify research, synthesize information Teacher Student Show how to infer answers...
 
Inquiry Groups <ul><li>If we were to continue, groups would discuss: </li></ul><ul><li>What do we collectively know about ...
Final Product & Assessment share learning, demonstrate understanding, take action Teacher Student Co-construct expectation...
Going Public <ul><li>How can we best share this information with others?  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Managed choice </li></ul><...
Assessment & Evaluation “We grade the learning, not the knowing.” <ul><li>Assessment fills us in on what students are doin...
Consider your objectives… <ul><ul><li>Gather relevant information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluate source reliability <...
Research to Build and Present Knowledge <ul><li>7.  Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on foc...
Tools & tips for facilitating inquiry <ul><li>Start small… </li></ul><ul><li>Mini-inqury  (pg. 19-27) </li></ul><ul><li>Te...
<ul><li>Recommendation: Don’t add on—replace  </li></ul><ul><li>Engagement: Initial push back—don’t be discouraged.  </li>...
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Nonfiction Inquiry & Literature Circles

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  • Currently have 40 people enrolled; make three sets of three posters for the carousel Wrap it up: use as a formative assessment tool
  • Press F5 or enter presentation mode to view the poll If you like, you can use this slide as a template for your own voting slides. You might use a slide like this if you feel your audience would benefit from the picture showing a text message on a phone. In an emergency during your presentation, if the poll isn&apos;t showing, navigate to this link in your web browser: http://www.polleverywhere.com/free_text_polls/LTE5NjM0MTkyODA
  • This slide is for display to the audience to show them how they will vote on your polls in your presentation. You can remove this slide if you like or if the audience is already comfortable with texting and/or voting with Poll Everywhere. Sample Oral Instructions: Ladies and gentlemen , throughout today’s meeting we’re going to engage in some audience polling to find out what you’re thinking, what you’re up to and what you know. Now I’m going to ask for your opinion. We’re going to use your phones to do some audience voting just like on American Idol. So please take out your cell phones, but remember to leave them on silent. You can participate by sending a text message. This is a just standard rate text message, so it may be free for you, or up to twenty cents on some carriers if you do not have a text messaging plan. The service we are using is serious about privacy. I cannot see your phone numbers, and you’ll never receive follow-up text messages outside this presentation. There’s only one thing worse than email spam – and that’s text message spam because you have to pay to receive it!
  • This slide is for display to the audience to show them how they will vote on your polls in your presentation. You can remove this slide if you like or if the audience is already comfortable with texting and/or voting with Poll Everywhere. Sample Oral Instructions: Ladies and gentlemen , throughout today’s meeting we’re going to engage in some audience polling to find out what you’re thinking, what you’re up to and what you know. Now I’m going to ask for your opinion. We’re going to use your phones or laptops to do some audience voting just like on American Idol. So please take out your mobilephones or laptops, but remember to leave them on silent. You can participate by submitting an answer at Poll4.com on your laptop or a mobile phone. The service we are using is serious about privacy. I cannot see who you are or who voted.
  • This slide is for display to the audience to show them how they will vote on your polls in your presentation. You can remove this slide if you like or if the audience is already comfortable with texting and/or voting with Poll Everywhere. Sample Oral Instructions: Ladies and gentlemen , throughout today’s meeting we’re going to engage in some audience polling to find out what you’re thinking, what you’re up to and what you know. Now I’m going to ask for your opinion. We’re going to use Twitter to do some audience voting. So please take out your cell phones or laptops, but remember to leave them on silent. The way you will be able to participate is by tweeting a response to @poll. Your followers won’t be bothered by this message.
  • Look at the quotes in your table groups. In 3 sentences or less, make a case for inquiry.
  • Create a planning template for teachers?
  • The benefits of the pictures are twofold—not only do they build background knowledge by giving a visual of the topic/event; gives them an opportunity to practice the continuum with an accessible “text”
  • Showed the movie first
  • Establish a purpose for reading (model and generate questions as a group); Read and think aloud, model questions for the continuum; Model Think Aloud Partner Practice for Think Aloud Write what the readers are saying on the continuum Read independently (as students would) Golden line—underline or star Continue adding to the Comprehension Continuum as you read
  • Structured, guided discussion; more structure at first as students move from teacher directed to authenticity
  • Everything up to this point has been part of the foundation for inquiry—depending upon the depth of the inquiry project, you might some of these techniques or all.
  • Ten seconds to look at letters First time all alone Grade using A, B, C, D, F (on chart paper with three columns for each try) F=0-5 D=6-10 C=11-15 B=16-20 A=21+ Second time through partners, but no time to make a plan, can’t get credit for the same letters (does that mean one point for same letter? Yes!) Last time tables work together and get one minute to make a plan Brainstorm why it worked. Then choose top three.
  • On chart paper
  • Possible Answers: Strategies Divided work Clear expectations Engagement Knew what the work was Multiple opportunities Familiar assessment format Knew what success was going to look like Realistic expectations I can’t to I can Chunked into smaller pieces Work together effectively everyone helpful, involved Were successful TOP THREE: (from each table) willingness to share, clear expectations that were realistic, time to process as a group, have a plan
  • Ways to create individual accountability; pg. 275 in Comp and Collab has lots of ideas for ensuring accountability
  • Find Someone who…
  • Now teachers are in ‘new’ groups based on inquiry question interest Reference handouts pages 11-17
  • These are the science and technical subjects anchors
  • Ch. 8 mini inquiry handout; textbook circles handout
  • Nonfiction Inquiry & Literature Circles

    1. 1. Heather Hanson, Brooklyn Junior Jessica Crooker, North View
    2. 2. Objectives
    3. 4. Don’t forget: You can copy-paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize the poll.
    4. 5. How To Vote via Texting <ul><li>Standard texting rates only (worst case US $0.20) </li></ul><ul><li>We have no access to your phone number </li></ul><ul><li>Capitalization doesn’t matter, but spaces and spelling do </li></ul>TIPS EXAMPLE
    5. 6. How To Vote via Poll4.com Capitalization doesn’t matter, but spaces and spelling do TIP EXAMPLE
    6. 7. How To Vote via Twitter <ul><li>Capitalization doesn’t matter, but spaces and spelling do </li></ul><ul><li>Since @poll is the first word, your followers will not receive this tweet </li></ul>TIPS EXAMPLE
    7. 9. <ul><li>“ Despite these challenges , to truly prepare students to be substantive thinkers and democratic citizens , we need to move from the tyranny of information-transmission teaching that dominates American education to inquiry-based teaching. There is no cost to the move, since it actually improves students’ performance on standardized tests, as it improves their engagement, understanding, and ability to apply what they have learned.” </li></ul><ul><li>– Jeff Wilhelm, 2007 </li></ul>
    8. 10. Why Inquiry? <ul><li>Engage students in reading content-related texts </li></ul><ul><li>Offer choice to increase “buy in” </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiate for a diverse population of students </li></ul><ul><li>Push students to be seekers of knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Foster thinking skills </li></ul><ul><li>Allow students to explore areas of interest </li></ul><ul><li>Promote ownership of learning </li></ul><ul><li>Applicable in all content areas </li></ul><ul><li>Appeals to adolescents’ need to be social </li></ul><ul><li>Can lead to deeper comprehension </li></ul>
    9. 11. Instructional opportunities… <ul><ul><li>Gather relevant information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluate source reliability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bibliography/Works Cited </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In-text citation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organization of information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Asking questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Curiosity to learn </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Establishing a purpose for reading </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multi-tasking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Problem-solving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to use technology to find and create </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Summarizing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Paraphrasing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Differentiating common knowledge from original ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to synthesize information </li></ul></ul>
    10. 13. Overview of an Inquiry Cycle <ul><li>Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Shared text & comprehension strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration, Participation, Accountability </li></ul><ul><li>Investigation & Gathering Information </li></ul><ul><li>Final Product & Assessment—Go Public! </li></ul>
    11. 14. Establishing Background Knowledge & Activate Prior Knowledge invite curiosity, build background, find topics Teacher Students Invites curiosity, questioning Express their own curiosity Shares own curiosity Explore, experience, and learn Models personal inquiry Wonder and ask questions Demonstrates questioning & finding a topic Read, listen, and view to build background Immerse students in topics to build background knowledge Connect new information to background knowledge Confers with groups & individuals Meet with teams to set schedules, ground rules, and goals
    12. 15. <ul><li>Read the passage. </li></ul><ul><li>Employ any reading strategies you would normally use. </li></ul><ul><li>A short quiz will follow. </li></ul>Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge
    13. 16. Why Cold Reading is Often a Bad Idea Gallagher (2006) <ul><li>“ The Procedure” (Bransford/McCarrell, 1974) </li></ul><ul><li>Without looking at the text, please answer these questions: </li></ul><ul><li>What will be expensive?______ </li></ul><ul><li>One ____ may be sufficient depending on how much there is to do? </li></ul><ul><li>In 3 sentences, and in your own words, describe the procedure. </li></ul>Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge
    14. 17. Answers <ul><li>1.) Mistake </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Pile </li></ul><ul><li>3.) The procedure being described in this passage by Bransford and McCarrel (1974) is the act of doing the laundry. Certainly, if one had little to do, one pile would be enough. It is important to sort clothing into groups and not overload the machines as one little mistake can be expensive. While the procedure is simple, it is cyclical and never-ending as once our clean clothes are worn, they will be in need of laundering once again. </li></ul>Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge
    15. 18. Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge
    16. 19. Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge
    17. 20. <ul><li>“… the prime determinant of understanding is prior knowledge . Period, point blank, case closed.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Most ‘reading difficulties’ are really prior knowledge problems” </li></ul><ul><li>(Harvey & Daniels 2009) </li></ul>Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge
    18. 21. Why… How… <ul><li>Lay a foundation for continued learning </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of BK/PK = no understanding </li></ul><ul><li>How to activate or create BK/PK: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pictures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video clips </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Direct instruction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Brainstorming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pre-teaching Vocabulary </li></ul></ul>Establish Background Knowledge/Activate Prior Knowledge
    19. 23. Shared text & Comprehension Strategies develop questions, search for information/answers Teacher Students Flood students with resources and materials Articulate thoughts and questions about own interests and experiences Model how to read with a question in mind Listen, talk, read, view to gain information Demonstrate how to determine importance, take notes (post-it, code) Develop questions; then read, listen and view to answer them Helps students sharpen inquiry focus Use text and visual features to gain information Confers with groups & individual Meet with teams to set and monitor schedules and task completion
    20. 24. “ Saved by the Deep” by Rick Reilly Shared text & comprehension strategies
    21. 25. Collaboration, Participation, Accountability <ul><li>Benefits of Small Group Work </li></ul><ul><li>Lifelike; generate energy for challenging work </li></ul><ul><li>In small groups, we are smarter </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity is an asset </li></ul><ul><li>Engaged, interactive learning </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiated instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Employers increasingly require collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Well-structured=enhances student achievement </li></ul>
    22. 26. Small-group discussion <ul><li>Discussion Directions: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Golden Lines (5 minutes) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each person chooses one line to share (interesting, agree/disagree, made you think…) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Read the line to group and say WHY you chose it (no discussion yet, share only) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Give each group member a turn to share their golden lines. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2. Continuum/Interactive Discussion (5 minutes) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Someone shares a comment/question. Group members discuss their thoughts/comments until that point is exhausted or everyone has shared. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each person must share AT LEAST one post-it thought. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discussion must sustain for a minimum of 5 minutes. </li></ul></ul>Collaboration, participation, accountability
    23. 27. Small-group discussion <ul><li>3. Further Inquiry—Closing the Discussion (3-5 minutes) </li></ul><ul><li>As a group, come up with at least TWO questions relating to the reading that could potentially be further investigated. You may need to revisit the reading or reflect on the discussion. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are you still wondering about? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Did anyone pose a question during discussion that went unanswered? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Did you have a question during the reading that was never answered? </li></ul></ul>Collaboration, participation, accountability
    24. 28. Hypothesis: Collaborative teams consistently out-perform individuals <ul><li>You will need: </li></ul><ul><li>scratch piece of paper </li></ul><ul><li>complete focus and attention </li></ul>Collaboration, participation, accountability
    25. 29. Directions for Facilitator <ul><li>Ten seconds to look at letters </li></ul><ul><li>First time all alone </li></ul><ul><li>Grade using A, B, C, D, F (on chart paper with three columns for each try) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>F=0-5 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>D=6-10 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C=11-15 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>B=16-20 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A=21+ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Second time through partners, but no time to make a plan, can’t get credit for the same letters (does that mean one point for same letter? Yes!) </li></ul><ul><li>Last time tables work together and get one minute to make a plan </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm why it worked. </li></ul><ul><li>Then choose top three. </li></ul>
    26. 30. Possible answers to “Teams That Work” <ul><li>Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Divided work </li></ul><ul><li>Clear expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Knew what the work was </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Familiar assessment format </li></ul><ul><li>Knew what success was going to look like </li></ul><ul><li>Realistic expectations I can’t to I can </li></ul><ul><li>Chunked into smaller pieces </li></ul><ul><li>Work together effectively everyone helpful, involved </li></ul><ul><li>Were successful </li></ul><ul><li>TOP THREE: (from each table) willingness to share, clear expectations that were realistic, time to process as a group, have a plan </li></ul>
    27. 31. <ul><li>G </li></ul><ul><li>DMR </li></ul><ul><li>VXKBQ </li></ul><ul><li>TFICZYN </li></ul><ul><li>LPEWSJXA </li></ul>
    28. 32. <ul><li>“… [we] need to explicitly teach students how to successfully interact with one another and also how to reflect on those interactions… </li></ul><ul><li>Unfortunately, taking time for what some consider ‘non-academic’ activities seems to fly in the face of our standards-drive curriculums. However, a positive classroom climate will enable your students to work at levels of engagement, collaboration, and self-direction that otherwise would not be possible.” </li></ul><ul><li>(Steineke, 2002) </li></ul>Collaboration, participation, accountability
    29. 33. Accountability <ul><li>Research notebooks </li></ul><ul><li>During reading activities </li></ul><ul><li>Artifacts/evidence of thinking & learning </li></ul><ul><li>Small group or individual conferences </li></ul><ul><li>Midcourse corrections </li></ul><ul><li>Rubric (see Harvey & Daniels for examples) </li></ul><ul><li>Student reflections </li></ul>Collaboration, participation, accountability
    30. 35. Investigation & Gathering Information intensify research, synthesize information Teacher Student Show how to infer answers and draw conclusions Engage in deeper reading and research Engage students in guided discussion and debates Keep asking: So what? What about this really matters? Share how to evaluate sources Conduct “people” research: interviews, surveys, focus groups Teach interviewing strategies Synthesize information to build knowledge Confer with groups and individuals Meet with teams to monitor schedules, complete specific tasks and plan for sharing
    31. 37. Inquiry Groups <ul><li>If we were to continue, groups would discuss: </li></ul><ul><li>What do we collectively know about our new topic? </li></ul><ul><li>What do we want to know now? Who will research these questions? </li></ul><ul><li>How many diverse resources can we include? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Information, opinions, written texts, videos, music, cartoons, pictures/photographs, maps, charts, graphs </li></ul></ul>Investigation & gathering information
    32. 38. Final Product & Assessment share learning, demonstrate understanding, take action Teacher Student Co-construct expectations for final project Co-construct expectations for final project Share widest range of possibilities for sharing/performing Demonstrate learning with performances, posters, models, essays, poetry, etc… Helps students find real audiences Become teachers as they share knowledge Responds, assesses, and evaluates projects Reflect on their knowledge building, cooperative processes & changes in their own beliefs or behaviors Helps students share learning by taking actions Take action through writing, speaking, community work, advocacy
    33. 39. Going Public <ul><li>How can we best share this information with others? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Managed choice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ELA anchor standards for Speaking, Viewing, Listening, and Media Literacy </li></ul></ul>Final product & assessment
    34. 40. Assessment & Evaluation “We grade the learning, not the knowing.” <ul><li>Assessment fills us in on what students are doing & how effective our instruction has been </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers reflect, revise, and reshape instruction </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Evaluation gives a value to what students have learned </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Body of evidence: work samples, student talk, performances, artifacts, conference notes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Individual accountability=key to small-group assessment </li></ul>Final product & assessment
    35. 41. Consider your objectives… <ul><ul><li>Gather relevant information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evaluate source reliability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bibliography/Works Cited </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In-text citation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organization of information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Asking questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Curiosity to learn </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Establishing a purpose for reading </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multi-tasking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Problem-solving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to use technology to find and create </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Summarizing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Paraphrasing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Differentiating common knowledge from original ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to synthesize information </li></ul></ul>Final product & assessment
    36. 42. Research to Build and Present Knowledge <ul><li>7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. </li></ul><ul><li>8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. </li></ul><ul><li>9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. </li></ul>Final product & assessment
    37. 43. Tools & tips for facilitating inquiry <ul><li>Start small… </li></ul><ul><li>Mini-inqury (pg. 19-27) </li></ul><ul><li>Textbook circles (pg. 28-30) </li></ul><ul><li>Short stories </li></ul><ul><li>Short texts </li></ul><ul><li>Pictures/video </li></ul><ul><li>Science labs </li></ul><ul><li>A single chapter or section of reading </li></ul>
    38. 44. <ul><li>Recommendation: Don’t add on—replace </li></ul><ul><li>Engagement: Initial push back—don’t be discouraged. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider small group conferencing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inquiry & thinking is hard work! </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Don’t teach every skill in one inquiry unit. Narrow down and let go. </li></ul>Tools & tips for facilitating inquiry
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