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By: Jessica PorterKEY POINTS IN MACBETH FROMACT 1-ACT 3
ACT 1 SCENE 1“THE WITCHES MEET”In the first scene of the entireplay, the three witches meet anddecide a time and place to ...
This scene in Macbeth gives the audience background informationon the battle and the revolt. King Duncan expresses relief ...
ACT 1 SCENE 3“FATE & DESTINY”This scene from what I am aware is one of the most spokenabout scenes because of Shakespeare‟...
Things that do sound so fair?” (I.iii.51-52) questioning his shock to the witches words. From howBanquo states this it alm...
At this stage we find out that the execution to the Thane of Cawdor has beenwitnessed to confirm his death. King Duncan sa...
Macbeth‟s last few words to the audience from scene four tells the audience how evilhis desires are, and shows that he is ...
By saying these things she implies that she wants to become more manly, eviland remorseless. Metaphorically, she wants to ...
There is an irony throughout this scene as an innocent King Duncan is delightful to bea guest at Inverness commenting on s...
This scene creates a horrifying atmosphere approaching the murder andexpresses some differences between Banquo and Macbeth...
Lady Macbeth had been busy getting drunk whilst Macbeth was off murdering the King.You can note that she had to have a cou...
The most important part of these scenes is that MacbethACT 2 SCENE 3-4“IT WASN’T ME”
IMAGEShttp://wallpaperswide.com/three_witches-wallpapers.htmlhttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/-WEe-xr3gDWY/T_rqgyOpdmI/AAAAAAAABeM...
Act 1-3 analysis
Act 1-3 analysis
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Act 1-3 analysis

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Summary of Macbeth from Act 1 to Act 3

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Transcript of "Act 1-3 analysis"

  1. 1. By: Jessica PorterKEY POINTS IN MACBETH FROMACT 1-ACT 3
  2. 2. ACT 1 SCENE 1“THE WITCHES MEET”In the first scene of the entireplay, the three witches meet anddecide a time and place to tellMacbeth their prophecies. Thisplays an important part ofMacbeth as this scene foreshadowswhat awaits Macbeth, theaudience will know what toexpect and Macbeth will not.Even though it is not said whythey must meet Macbeth, theaudience can pick up hints ofwhat is to come. When the witches call out to their familiars “I come, Graymalkin!”, “Paddockcalls.” and “Anon.” (I.i.9-11) this gives the audience the inkling that these three women aresupernatural, as they are calling back to their familiars, spirits in the form of animals.
  3. 3. This scene in Macbeth gives the audience background informationon the battle and the revolt. King Duncan expresses relief whenhe says “O valiant cousin! worthy gentleman!” (I.ii.24) which tellsus who the battle is in favor of. We also find out that the Thaneof Cawdor is a traitor to the King and that he will be replaced byMacbeth, the Thane of Glamis, as he had killed many in battleand is brave as Ross says “For brave Macbeth – well he deservesthat name –” (I.ii.16). There is an irony in this scene that willsoon show in the next scene, as audience we are already informedthat Macbeth is to be announced Thane of Cawdor.ACT 1 SCENE 2“THE TRAITOR”
  4. 4. ACT 1 SCENE 3“FATE & DESTINY”This scene from what I am aware is one of the most spokenabout scenes because of Shakespeare‟s use of fate. InShakespearean time people were very superstitious and believedin witches and the supernatural powers they have.Macbeth alongside Banquo meet the witches. Of course weknew this was bound to happen as we listened to what thewitches had to say in Act 1 Scene 1. Banquo is the first tomention the presence of these three weird looking women withhis remark “What are these So withered, and so wild in theirattire,” (I.iii.39-40). Macbeth doesn‟t say much when the witchesare seen and he looks more prepared to accept what the witcheshave to say. Banquo also mentions the witches “choppy fingerlaying” (I.iii.44) on her lips after he talked about their unfamiliar looks. The reason the witches put theirfingers upon their lips in response to Banquo may suggest they want to speak to Macbeth, not him. Macbeth,curious to know what they have to say requests them to “Speak, if you can. What are you?” (I.iii.48). Thethree witches hail Macbeth giving him titles he was not yet rewarded. If you notice closely, after they hail himThane of Cawdor, when they hail him King, they say “hereafter!” (I.iii.50). Meaning they have not exactly liedto him, however they mislead him as they delivered the news of his new title as opposed to telling him he willbe King after he is given the news. The play may have taken a different course if they were to tell him once hewas already told he was Thane of Cawdor. Anyhow, once the witches tell Macbeth his future, Banquo pointsout Macbeth‟s reaction to the prophecies and states “Good sir, why do you start, and seem to fear
  5. 5. Things that do sound so fair?” (I.iii.51-52) questioning his shock to the witches words. From howBanquo states this it almost seems like he is wondering if Macbeth is taking the prophecies intoreal consideration and is baffled by the thought. As an audience reading Macbeth, this is thestarting point of the story because it is the part where Macbeth‟s fate is questioned byhimself, Banquo and possibly the witches. Another key part to note in this scene is that Banquo isaddressed to by the witches with riddles as opposed to the clear statements they gave Macbeth. Inthe quote “Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none.” (I.iii.67) the witches suggest he willbecome the ancestor of kings which brings into view that his sons are potential heirs to thethrone. Macbeth becomes more and more indulged in the prophecies and demands “Stay youimperfect speakers, tell me more.” (I.iii.70) although the witches vanish once he completestalking. Soon after Ross arrives to deliver the news to Macbeth about the Thane of Cawdor.Before he does this he summarizes his last conversation with the King regarding Macbeth‟sperformance on the battlefield. He states “Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make, Strangeimages of death.” (I.iii.96-97) this is a comment he makes about Macbeth describing him as abrave person for not being frightened by the glimpse of the bodies of the men he has justkilled, this is an important line that should be noted for later events to come as later on, Macbethbecomes frightened when he is faced with the death of the King who he kills himself.ACT 1 SCENE 3“FATE AND DESTINY” (CONT’D)
  6. 6. At this stage we find out that the execution to the Thane of Cawdor has beenwitnessed to confirm his death. King Duncan says something regarding hisbitter feeling about putting his trust in others “There‟s no art To find themind‟s construction in the face. He was a gentleman on whom I built Anabsolute trust.” (I.iv.11-13). The King knows that you cannot truly knowsomeone based upon the way they present themselves and states that there isno skill that can enable anyone to know a persons true intentions. This is alittle humorous as Macbeth walks in and the King becomes excited at hisarrival, little does he know he will soon be betrayed by his “worthiestcousin!”(I.iv.14). When Macbeth speaks in response to Duncan‟s thanks, hespeaks very modestly claiming he was only doing his job. Macbeth also showsthat he is aware of the importance of stable relationships whether it be infamily relationships or in state relationships, in which he is soon to break…ACT 1 SCENE 4“FORRES”
  7. 7. Macbeth‟s last few words to the audience from scene four tells the audience how evilhis desires are, and shows that he is trying to stray away from thoughts of what he‟scommitted himself to. In the letter Lady Macbeth reads aloud in scene five he soundsfar more confident as he says “Lay it to thy heart, and farewell.” (I.v.13) whichtranslates to „consider well what I have written‟. He expresses so much more belief inthis letter than he does in the previous scene. Although his letter to his lady comesacross as bold, Lady Macbeth knows that Macbeth “is too full o‟ th‟ milk of humankindness” and that his weakness will get in the way of his ambition. She takes his letteras a promise stating “and shalt be What thou art promis‟d.” (I.v.14-15). By the end ofthe letter, Lady Macbeth reads, “That I may pour my spirits in thine ear, And chastisewith the valour of my tongue” (I.v.26-27) the planned conspiracy against the King hasalready started to shatter his character. This line in the letter equally has an affect onLady Macbeth as this brings out her unfeminine, aggressive instincts encouraging herline “unsex me here…Make thick my blood, Stop up th‟ access and passage toremorse…And take my milk for gall,” (I.v.41-48).ACT 1 SCENE 5“INVERNESS”
  8. 8. By saying these things she implies that she wants to become more manly, eviland remorseless. Metaphorically, she wants to trade her “sweet” milk for“bitter” gall. This prayer to herself shows an intense desire to be rid of hersensitive qualities. There is a significant resemblance in her last couple of linesbefore Macbeth enters to Macbeth‟s “Stars hide your fires” (I.iv.50-53).“Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell” (I.v.50-51)shows that her prayer has more determination to welcome the night and it‟sdarkness in comparison to Macbeth‟s “Stars, hide your fires;” (I.iv.50) lines.Their level of determination is evidently on completely different levels whenMacbeth enters to hear Lady Macbeth‟s excited comment “Thy letters havetransported me beyond…” (I.v.56) that their plan was settled and that intheory, the crown is already theirs. Macbeth shows a different level ofdetermination by his reluctance to address that topic.ACT 1 SCENE 5“INVERNESS” (CONT’D)
  9. 9. There is an irony throughout this scene as an innocent King Duncan is delightful to bea guest at Inverness commenting on such generous hospitality. The King naively doesnot get the inkling of any suspicion in Lady Macbeth‟s over the top greetings‟ use ofwords. Macbeth‟s soliloquy gives his character the opportunity to speak how he feelswithout the influence of another characters presence. He argues to himself and ispossibly muttering, indecisively in lines 1-28 in scene 7. He simply makes a convincingcase against his conspiracy to murder King Duncan. Macbeth‟s human kindness isrevealed in this scene and is exactly how Lady Macbeth predicted him to be in Act 1Scene 5. Of course Lady Macbeth comes in and bluntly questions her husbandsabsence. Macbeth decides to tell her about his new thoughts which makes her evenmore furious. She tells him that if she swore a promise like he did, she would havefollowed through using an example of smashing an innocent baby‟s head in lines 54-58. Because Lady Macbeth is so dominant in what she has had to say, this causesMacbeth to feebly ask “If we should fail?” (I.vii.59), setting her off even more. LadyMacbeth looks so brave at this point in Macbeth. They finally decide to plot all evidenceon the drunk guards to cover up their mess. Macbeth ends the scene with a metaphor“I am settled and bend up.” I.vii.80) meaning like an archer, he is preparing to fire.ACT 1 SCENE 6 & 7“HOSTING KING DUNCAN”
  10. 10. This scene creates a horrifying atmosphere approaching the murder andexpresses some differences between Banquo and Macbeth. Banquo brings upthat he “…dreamt last night of the three Weird Sisters,” (II.i.20) and tellsMacbeth “To you they have show‟d some truth.” (II.i21) referring to thewitches prophecies. Macbeth defensively claimed that he had not beenthinking about them but suggests to spare time to talk with Banquo aboutthem. It is obvious that Banquo is suspicious of Macbeth‟s incentives as hedoes not want to commit himself to a conversation. Perhaps Banquo iswaiting to see what is in store for his sons? In Macbeth‟s pre-murder soliloquy(the first part), this is where he is in his subconscious state of mind. He sees adagger in which he questions “Is this a dagger I see before me,” (II.i.33) andthen he goes off and kills Duncan.ACT 2 SCENE 1“THE FLOATING DAGGER”
  11. 11. Lady Macbeth had been busy getting drunk whilst Macbeth was off murdering the King.You can note that she had to have a couple of drinks to give her that “fire” (II.ii.2). Thisshows that Lady Macbeth is weaker than she appears to be because she resorted to alcohol.Even though she had so much artificial courage, she still was frightened by the owl‟sscream. This is interesting that Shakespeare incorporated the owl into Macbeth because anowl‟s cry is supposedly is a sign of an upcoming death. When Macbeth enters and his wifecries “My husband!” (II.ii.13) there is more than one possibility of what emotions she isexpressing i.e. Admiration? Shock? Anticipation? Etc. The conversation is so off balance, Ithink the audience would feel some tension. Later on Macbeth tells his wife “…it cried„Sleep no more‟ to all the house;” (II.ii.41), of course Lady Macbeth‟s artificial couragecauses her to bitterly snap “Go get some water And wash your filthy witness from yourhand.” (II.ii.46-47). It‟s ironic Lady Macbeth says this because in act 5, she is the one whosays “What, will these hands ne‟er be clean?” (V.i.40) as she thoroughly wrings her handsunder running water in her sleep. Lady Macbeth gives up with trying to focus Macbeth,taking the bloody daggers away and sending him to their chamber. When Lady Macbethmeets back with him Macbeth she accuses him of being a coward and lectures him. Theconfidence she has now will not last very long though.ACT 2 SCENE 2“ARTIFICIAL COURAGE”
  12. 12. The most important part of these scenes is that MacbethACT 2 SCENE 3-4“IT WASN’T ME”
  13. 13. IMAGEShttp://wallpaperswide.com/three_witches-wallpapers.htmlhttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/-WEe-xr3gDWY/T_rqgyOpdmI/AAAAAAAABeM/NsvEKrLMJrs/s1600/MacbethArt2.jpghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-5_-pDILkeYU/T_8ZZtnz3WI/AAAAAAAAC_s/FBXqWV2PO6w/s1600/Art+-+Macbeth+Logo+-+Scottish+Plaid+Title.jpghttp://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQVXIYvbD1yYI55_qUSxKlun6G0xWWyBJeBR0VvCIgKEnIop44CPQhttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/_WSzw9u3NcgQ/S9JCnAGXIxI/AAAAAAAAACc/9jOpwOx-ozI/s1600/MacbethAndBanquo-Witches.jpg

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