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Outline of Chapter 2 from The Beat Goes On: Popular Music in America

Outline of Chapter 2 from The Beat Goes On: Popular Music in America

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MUS118 Ch 2 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Chapter Two Popular Music in the 19 th Century
  • 2. Anglo-American – Americans of English, Scottish, Welsh, or Irish ancestry
  • 3. Oral tradition: Passed on by ear
  • 4. Breakdown – up-tempo fiddle tune for dancing
  • 5. Fiddle tunes
    • Music for barn dance not concert stage
    • Music considered “uncultivated”
    • Recurring chorus influenced popular music
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wttuP200fGM
    • Listen: “Old Joe Clark”
  • 6. Minstrelsy 1840s
    • Set in motion a revolution in American popular music.
    • Minstrel songs became part of fabric of American life
  • 7. Folk elements – songs, fiddle, bones = new sound http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4NEr0SI3vc&feature=related
  • 8. Blackface
    • Performers smeared burnt cork on their faces to portray themselves as blacks
  • 9. Minstrel Show
    • 3 main performers
        • Interlocutor – master of ceremonies
        • Endmen – Tambo (tambourine) and Bones (animal bones used as percussion)
  • 10. Main Characters of Minstrel Show
    • Jim Crow = country bumpkin/ uneducated
    • Zip Coon = city guy urban dandy
  • 11. Importance of Minstrel Show
    • First stage entertainment in America
    • Primary purpose to entertain – not uplift/educate
    • Minstrel show was catalyst for American popular song
  • 12. Example - “De Boatman’s Dance”
    • Verse/chorus, instrumentation, upbeat tempo
    • Pseudo dialect, little authentic African-American music
  • 13. Stephen Foster (1826-1864)
    • Most important 19 th- Century American songwriter
  • 14. Parlor Songs
    • Simple, genteel
    • Voice and piano
    • Amateur
  • 15. Plantation Songs
    • Hybrid – merger of minstrel/parlor
    • Parlor sentiment/ Minstrel theme
    Example – “Old Folks at Home”
  • 16. African-American entertainers after the Civil War
    • Jubilee Choirs – spirituals
    • African-American minstrels – incorporate spirituals = minstrel-spirituals
  • 17. First Black Entertainers
    • More popular in minstrel shows
    • Had to perpetuate the white stereo-types of plantation life – acting and blackface
  • 18. Legacy of Minstrel Show
    • Entertainment for masses – not to uplift/educate
    • Used vernacular speech/music
    • Synthesis of middle-class song/folk = a new style
    • Use of dance music in mainstream – first instance
  • 19. Cakewalk
    • From minstrel show
    • High stepping/syncopated dance
    • Prize was a cake
  • 20. Diversity in Popular Stage Entertainment after the Civil War
    • Minstrel show made it clear that there was a market
    • Improvements in everyday life
    • Audience grew with immigration
  • 21. Vaudeville – variety show
    • Singers, dancers, comics, etc.
    • No sense of unity
    • Ca.1870: Replaced minstrel show as most popular form of entertainment in US
    • Remained until 1930s – Depression
  • 22. Revue – loosely joined show
    • Based on European operas
    • Watered down
    • Irreverent, unrelated acts
    • Thin plot all taken from minstrel show
  • 23. Operetta – told stories of far-away places, long ago, exotic locations
    • Fairy-tale settings
    • Lite classical music for cultural elite
  • 24. Quickly Developing Popular Music
    • 2 decades before the Civil War = birth of popular music
    • 3 decades after = birth of popular music industry
  • 25. Tin Pan Alley
    • Sound of song-pluggers sounded like tin pans crashing
  • 26. Dance Rhythms in popular songs
    • Waltz songs – ¾ time
    • Example – “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”
  • 27. Band Music
    • Concert band- most popular instrumental ensemble of late 19 th century
  • 28. John Philip Sousa – 1854-1932 – “The March King”
    • Precision/musicianship
    • Marches, popular tunes, originals, classical pieces, virtuoso soloists
    • Example: “The Stars and Stripes Forever http://lcweb2.loc.gov/natlib/ihas/service/patriotic/100010504/100010504.mp3
  • 29. Importance of Sousa and Foster
    • Most famous works were immediately popular and remain popular
    • Finest examples in the genre
    • Music is uniquely American, with no African influence